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Conferences & Lecture Series

2004 G8 Pre-Summit Conference
Security, Prosperity and Freedom: Why America Needs the G8
June 3–4, 2004
Indiana University, Bloomington, IN

Hosted by Indiana University’s Center for International Business Education and Research, Office of the Vice-President for Research, West European Studies National Resource Center and Office of International Programs, and with the Research Group on Global Financial Governance, the Guido Carli Association, the G8 Research Group, and the EnviReform Project

Biographies for the Special Videoconference Session on Security


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Speaker Biographies

David Audretsch is the Ameritech Chair of Economic Development, Director of the Institute for Development Strategies and Director of the Center for West European Studies at Indiana University. He is also Director of the Max Planck Institute for Economics Research and a Research Fellow of the Centre for Economic Policy Research in London. Between 1984 and 1997, he was at the Wissenschaftszentrum Berlin für Sozialforschung in Berlin, where he served as Acting Director between 1989 and 1991. He has consulted with the World Bank, National Academy of Sciences, U.S. State Department, United States Federal Trade Commission, General Accounting Office and International Trade Commission as well as the United Nations, Commission of the European Union, the European Parliament, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, as well as numerous private corporations, state governments and a number of European governments. Extensively published, he is author of Globalization and Regionalization (Kluwer, 2002) and Innovation and Industry Evolution (MIT Press, 1995). He is co-founder and co-editor of Small Business Economics: An International Journal. Professor Audretsch was awarded the 2001 International Award for Entrepreneurship and Small Business Research by the Swedish Foundation for Small Business Research.

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Sir Nicholas Bayne, KCMG, is a Fellow at the International Trade Policy Unit of the London School of Economics and Political Science. As a British diplomat, he was High Commissioner to Canada from 1992 to 1996, Economic Director at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office from 1988 to 1992, and Ambassador to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development from 1985 to 1988. He has published numerous articles and books, including Hanging In There (Ashgate, 2000) and, with Stephen Woolcock, The New Economic Diplomacy (Ashgate, 2002); he is co-author, with Robert Putnam, of Hanging Together: Co-operation and Conflict in the Seven Power Summits (Harvard University Press, 1987). Sir Nicholas also contributed to New Directions in Global Economic Governance: Managing Globalisation in the Twenty-First Century (Ashgate, 2001) and New Directions in Global Political Governance: The G8 and International Order in the Twenty-First Century (Ashgate, 2002).

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Robert Fauver joined the U.S. Department of the Treasury in 1970 and moved to the State Department in 1989. From 1993 to 1994, he served at the White House as Special Assistant to the President and a senior director of the National Security Council and National Economic Council, and as G7 Sherpa, the personal representative of President Bill Clinton to the annual summits. During his career he held many offices, including Deputy Assistant Secretary for East Asia and the Pacific, U.S. Coordinator for Asian-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) and Deputy Undersecretary for Economic Affairs, as well as Senior Adviser to the Undersecretary for Economic Affairs. In 1995, he was National Intelligence Officer for Economics in the National Intelligence Council. Upon his retirement from public service in 2000, Mr. Fauver became president of Fauver Associates, LLC, a private consulting firm in the field of political and economic strategic intelligence. He received his Bachelor of Arts from Ohio Wesleyan University, and a Master of Arts in Economics from the University of Maryland.

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Michele Fratianni is the W. George Pinnell Professor and Chair of Business Economics and Public Policy at the Kelley School of Business at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana. He has taught also at the Catholic University of Louvain, the Università Cattolica of Milan, the Università Sapienza of Rome, Marquette University, and the Free University of Berlin. He has served as economic advisor to the European Commission in Brussels and senior staff economist with the U.S. President's Council of Economic Advisers. Recipient of the Medal of the President of the Italian Republic for scientific achievements, Professor Fratianni has also received the Pio Manzú Center Gold Medal, the Scanno Prize in economics, and the Saint Vincent Prize in economics. He is the managing editor of Open Economies Review and is a widely published author of many articles and books; among his latest books is Storia Monetaria d'Italia (Etas, 2001). He is co-editor of Ideas for the Future of the International Monetary System (Kluwer Academic Press, 1999) and, with Paolo Savona and John Kirton, Governing Global Finance: New Challenges, G7 and IMF Contributions (Ashgate, 2002) and Sustaining Global Growth and Development: G7 and IMF Governance (Ashgate, 2003).

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Jeffrey Hart is Professor of Political Science at Indiana University, Bloomington, where he has taught international politics and international political economy since 1981. His first teaching position was at Princeton University from 1973 to 1980. He was a professional staff member of the President's Commission for a National Agenda for the Eighties from 1980 to 1981. Professor Hart worked at the Office of Technology Assessment of the U.S. Congress in 1985–86 and helped to write "International Competition in Services" (1987). He was visiting scholar at the Berkeley Roundtable on the International Economy, 1987–89. His major publications include The New International Economic Order (1983), Interdependence in the Post-Multilateral Era (1985), Rival Capitalists (1992), Globalization and Governance (1999), Coping with Globalization (2000), and Responding to Globalization (2000), The Politics of International Economic Relations (6th edition, 2002), Technology, Television and Competition (2004), and scholarly articles in World Politics, International Organization, the British Journal of Political Science, New Political Economy, and the Journal of Conflict Resolution.

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Bruce Jaffee is Professor of Business Economics and Public Policy at the Kelley School of Business at Indiana University. He was previously chair of that department, head of the School’s doctoral programs, and the associate dean – academics, and is currently the university’s faculty athletic representative. He is the author of numerous articles and reports in the fields of industry regulation, energy policy, taxation, and economic impact, and has has lectured on economic and business topics in China, Croatia, Russia, Slovenia, the Czech Republic, Poland and Hungary. From 1995 to 1999, he served as project director for a USAID program with the Budapest University of Economic Sciences and Public Administration to offer executive education programs in Hungary, and is currently project director for a U.S. State Department funded program to establish an English language MBA program in Croatia. Professor Jaffee holds an A.B. degree from Brown University and an M.A. and Ph.D. (with distinction) from Johns Hopkins University.

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John Kirton is Director of the G8 Research Group, Associate Professor of Political Science, Research Associate of the Centre for International Studies and Fellow of Trinity College at the University of Toronto. He has advised the Canadian Government on G7 participation and international trade and sustainable development, and has written widely on G7 summitry. He is co-author of Environmental Regulations and Corporate Strategy: A NAFTA Perspective (Oxford University Press, 1999) and co-editor of The G8's Role in the New Millennium (Ashgate, 1999), Shaping a New International Financial System: Challenges of Governance in a Globalizing World (Ashgate, 2000), Guiding Global Order: G8 Governance in the Twenty First Century (Ashgate, 2001), New Directions in Global Economic Governance: Managing Globalization in the Twenty-First Century (Ashgate, 2001), New Directions in Global Political Governance: The G8 and International Order in the Twenty-First Century (Ashgate, 2002), Sustaining Global Growth and Development: G7 and IMF Governance (Ashgate, 2003), and The G8, The United Nations and Conflict Prevention (Ashgate, 2004). Professor Kirton is Principal Investigator of "Strengthening Canada's Environmental Community through International Regime Reform" (the EnviReform project) at the University of Toronto.

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Donato Masciandaro is Professor of Monetary Economics at the Paolo Baffi Centre at Bocconi University and in the Department of Economics, Mathematics and Statistics at the University of Lecce. He has been a consultant to the Word Bank since 2002 and, prior to that, the Inter-American Development Bank (1999–2001) and the United Nations (1998–99). He has also been a member of the Paolo Baffi Centre’s Directory Board since 2004 and the International Advisory Council of the Indian Institute of Finance in Delhi since 2001. He has been an Associated Fellow of the Institute for International Political Studies (ISPI) in Milan since 2001, and editor of the Italian Financial System Report, published by the Rosselli Foundation in Turin, since 1994.

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Bernhard May is resident fellow at the Research Institute of the German Council on Foreign Relations (DGAP) in Berlin, where he is responsible for the U.S./Transatlantic Relations program. He has been a research fellow at the University of Cologne, a guest scholar at the Brookings Institution, a Krupp Senior Associate at the Institute for East-West Security Studies, a visiting fellow at the Japan Center for International Exchange in Tokyo, a guest scholar at the China Institute for Contemporary International Relations and the Chinese People’s Institute for Foreign Affairs in Beijing, a visiting fellow at the Institute for International Economics and a visiting fellow at Keio University in Tokyo. Widely published in English and German, he is co-editor of Asia, Europe and the Challenges of Globalisation (Berlin 1999) and co-author of The Uncertain Superpower: Domestic Dimensions of U.S. Foreign Policy after the Cold War (Opladen 2003), and a contributor to The New Transatlantic Agenda, edited by Hall Gardner and Radoslava Stefanova (Ashgate, 2001). Dr. May received his doctorate in political science and economics from the University of Cologne.

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Sylvia Ostry is the Distinguished Research Fellow at the Centre for International Studies at University of Toronto. She has held a number of positions in the Canadian federal government, including Chief Statistician, Deputy Minister of Consumer and Corporate Affairs, Chairman of the Economic Council of Canada, Deputy Minister of International Trade, Ambassador for Multilateral Trade Negotiations, and the Prime Minister's Personal Representative for the Economic Summit. From 1979 to 1983, Dr. Ostry was Head of the Economics and Statistics Department of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. She is a member of the Inter-American Dialogue, the Advisory Board of the Institute of International Economics, the Group of Thirty, the Academic Advisory Council of the Deputy Minister for International Trade, and a founding member of the Pacific Council on International Policy. Her most recent publications include “The World Trading System: In Dire Need of Reform,” Temple International and Comparative Law Journal, Spring 2003 and “The WTO: Post Seattle and Chinese Accession,” in China and the Long March to Global Trade, Routledge, 2003. Dr. Ostry has a doctorate in economics from McGill University and Cambridge University.

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Victoria Panova is a doctoral candidate in the Department of International Relations and Foreign Policy of Russia at Moscow State University of International Relations. She lectures on the English language, in particular on political translation and diplomatic correspondence, and on the history of international relations at Moscow State University of International Relations. Her areas of research is the G8 and its role in conflict management and she is author of Multilateral Mechanisms of Co-operation of the Major Industrial Powers (Group of Eight), 1975–2002 (in press).

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Risto Penttilä is Director of the Finnish Business and Policy Forum EVA, a think tank based in Helsinki. He is also a Fellow at the Saïd Business School at the University of Oxford and Secretary General of the European Business Leaders’ Convention. Previously, Professor Penttilä worked for Oxford Analytica in the UK and for the World Economic Forum in Geneva. He has also been member of Parliament and an advisor on international security affairs to the Finnish Minister of Defence. He has written several books on Nordic security and Finnish foreign and security policy writes occasional columns for the International Herald Tribune. His current interest is the role of the G8 in international peace and security. Professor Penttilä holds degrees from Yale University and the University of Oxford.

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Alan Rugman holds the L. Leslie Waters Chair in International Business at the Kelly School of Business at Indiana University in Bloomington, where he serves as Professor of International Business and Professor of Business Economics and Public Policy. He is also Director of the IU CIBER. He was Thames Water Fellow in Strategic Management at Templeton College, University of Oxford, where he remains an Associate Fellow. Dr. Rugman has published widely, appearing in leading refereed journals that deal with economic, managerial, and strategic aspects of multinational enterprises and with trade and investment policy. His 40-plus books include Inside the Multinationals (Columbia University Press, 1981), The Theory of Multinational Enterprises and Multinational Enterprises and Trade Policy (Elgar, 1996), Multinationals as Flagship Firms (co-author) (Oxford University Press, 2000), International Business (FT/Prentice Hall, 2000, 2003), The End of Globalization (Random House, 2000; AMACOM, 2001), (co-editor) The Oxford Handbook of International Business (Oxford University Press, 2001), and, forthcoming, The Regional Multinationals (Cambridge University Press, 2005). He has served as a consultant to major private sector companies, research institutes, and government agencies, and as an outside advisor on free trade, foreign investment, and international competitiveness to two Canadian prime ministers. Dr. Rugman served previously as Vice-President of the Academy of International Business and is now President-Elect and will serve as President from 2004 to 2006. He is also an investigator in "Strengthening Canada's Environmental Community through International Regime Reform" (the EnviReform project) at the University of Toronto.

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Shinichiro Uda is director of the G8 Research Group's Tokyo office. He is also president of the Institute of Promotion for the Policy Reform as well as President of the London School of Economics and Political Science International Social Economic Forum in Japan. He is president of Japan’s Globalization Strategy Study Group and a member of the Japan Centre for Economic Research, as well as of the Royal Institute of International Affairs and, formerly, the Japan Broadcasting Corporation. He has participated in many think tanks and seminars, particularly during the Asian financial crisis when he presented on “Where Is Japan’s Economy Really Going?” in November 1997 and “Managing the World Economy” in June 1999. Author of Politics and Ordinary Human Life (1966), Mr. Uda is a contributor to New Directions in Global Political Governance: The G8 and International Order in the Twenty-First Century, edited by John Kirton and Junichi Takase (Ashgate, 2002).

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Heidi Ullrich completed her PhD at the London School of Economics in 2002, where she has also taught a Summer School course on the European Union since 1997 and lectured on U.S. politics. She currently is senior trade policy officer with Consumers International. Previously, she lectured on EU integration at the University of Southampton and held research positions with both the U.S. Mission to the World Trade Organization and a member of the European Parliament. She has published on topics including contributions to Think Tanks across Nations: Policy Research and the Politics of Ideas, edited by Diane Stone, Andrew Denham and Mark Garnett (Manchester University Press, forthcoming), New Directions in Global Economic Governance: Managing Globalization in the Twenty-First Century, edited by John Kirton and George von Furstenberg (Ashgate, 2002) and Civil Society in the Information Age, edited by Peter Hajnal (Ashgate, 2002). She has also published in, among other journals, G8 Governance and the Journal of European Public Policy.

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Special Videoconference Session on Security

June 3, 2004
Indiana University, Bloomington, IN

With the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars
and the Center for Strategic and International Studies
in Washington DC

ProgramProspectusPapers
Register online

The conference will be webcast live — please check back for details,
and for updates on the conference program.

Email your comments and questions to our panelists! Click here.

Andre Belelieu is a Research Associate in the Americas Program at the Center for International and Strategic Studies, where he focuses on economic and security issues, including U.S. homeland security, border co-operation between Canada and the United States, international terrorism and North American economic integration. Before joining CSIS, he worked as a research associate at CSR, Incorporated, a consulting and research firm located in Arlington, Virginia. He has served as a policy analyst at the G8 Research Group in Toronto, with a focus on Germany and conflict prevention at the 2001 G8 Genoa Summit. He has published on several topics, including “The G8 and Terrorism: What Role for the G8 in the 21st Century?” (G8 Governance Working Paper No. 8, 2002) and “The Smart Border Process at Two: Losing Momentum?” (Hemisphere Focus, December 2003). Mr. Belelieu holds a master’s degree in European politics and policy from the London School of Economics and Political Science and a bachelor’s degree in international relations and German studies from the University of Toronto.

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Gary Bertsch is Director of the Center for International Trade and Security at the University of Georgia and a professor of comparative politics and international relations. His research includes working on new strategies to promote technology transfer and reduce weapons proliferation, critical issues of strategic trade and international security. He is co-editor of Engaging India: U.S. Strategic Relations with the World’s Largest Democracy (Routledge, 1999), Arms on the Market: Reducing the Risk of Proliferation in the Former Soviet Union (Routledge, 1998), and International Co-operation on Nonproliferation Export Controls (University of Michigan Press, 1994). Professor Bertsch received his PhD from the University of Oregon in 1970.

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Michèle Flournoy is senior advisor in the International Security Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, where she works on a broad range of defence policy and international security issues. Previously, she was a distinguished research professor at the Institute for National Strategic Studies at the National Defense University, where she founded and led the university’s Quadrennial Defense Review working group, which was chartered by the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff to develop intellectual capital in preparation for the Department of Defense’s 2001 QDR. Prior to joining NDU, she served as principal deputy assistant secretary of defence for strategy and threat reduction and deputy assistant secretary of defence for strategy. In addition to two edited volumes, Flournoy has published more than 50 articles on a variety of international security issues. Ms. Flournoy holds a B.A. in social studies from Harvard University and an M.Litt. in international relations from Balliol College, Oxford University, where she was a Newton-Tatum Scholar.

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Lee Hamilton is Director of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington DC. Previously, he served as a United States Congressman from Indiana. He chaired the House Committee on Foreign Affairs (now the Committee on International Relations) and the Subcommittee on Europe and the Middle East from the early 1970s until 1993. Mr. Hamilton also served as Chairman of the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, and the Select Committee to Investigate Covert Arms Transactions with Iran. Mr. Hamilton established himself as a leading congressional voice on foreign affairs, with particular interests in promoting democracy and market reform in the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, promoting peace and stability in the Middle East, expanding U.S. markets and trade overseas, and overhauling U.S. export and foreign aid policies. Mr. Hamilton is a graduate of DePauw University and Indiana University law school, and studied for a year at Goethe University.

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Igor Khripunov is Associate Director of the Center for International Trade and Security at the University of Georgia, where he oversees the projects in the former Soviet Union. He has been Adjunct Professor of Political Science at the University of Georgia since 1992. Previously, Professor Khripunov has served as an international civil servant at the United Nations, as well as a first secretary of the political and military section at the Soviet and later Russian Embassy in Washington DC. His areas of expertise include export control and nonproliferation, defence conversion, chemical and biological weapons, military space, and arms control compliance and verification. He has contributed to numerous books on international relations and his articles on Russia’s nonproliferation export control, conventional weapons trade, defence conversion and chemical weapons disposal have appeared in World Affairs Quarterly, Washington Quarterly, Arms Control Today, Comparative Strategy, Defense News and the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. He received his Ph.D. in international relations from the Moscow-based Diplomatic Academy.

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Thomas Sanderson is the deputy director of the Transnational Threats Initiative at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, where he focuses on the convergence of terrorism and international crime, terrorist groups and operations, U.S. counterterrorism policy and operations, and U.S. foreign and national security policy. Prior to joining CSIS, he served as a defence analyst with Science Applications International Corporation, where he conducted extensive studies of terrorist groups and terrorism policy for the U.S. Defense Intelligence Agency. He has co-authored studies on religious-based terrorism, weapons of mass destruction terrorism and the psychology of extreme violence. Mr. Sanderson held the 2001 Henry L. Stimson Center Fellowship at Fudan University in Shanghai, China, where he researched “Chinese Perspectives on US Ballistic Missile Defense” (a Stimson Center paper). He also has four years of development experience with nongovernmental organizations, focused on Central Asia and Russia. Mr. Sanderson holds a B.A. in international relations from Wheaton College (Massachusetts), and an M.A.L.D. from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University.

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Christopher Sands is a senior associate with the Canada Project in the Americas Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, as well as the director of strategic planning and evaluation at the International Republican Institute. He was a member of the CSIS Task Force on Terrorism, which produced To Prevail: An American Strategy for the Campaign Against Terrorism (CSIS Press, 2001). In 2002, he was a member of the Center for the Study of the Presidency's Working Group on the U.S.-Canada Strategic Partnership, which generated a report on U.S. defense planning for North America and Canada's strategic capabilities and options. In 1999, he was a Fulbright Scholar and visiting fellow at the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs at Carleton University in Ottawa. He is also a founding member of NetAmericas, a network of trade policy specialists in the Western Hemisphere advising the Organization of American States. His publications include The North American Auto Industry under NAFTA (CSIS, 1998), co-edited with Sidney Weintraub, and a chapter in Canada Among Nations 2000 (Oxford, 2000). He holds a B.A. in political science from Macalester College in St. Paul, Minnesota, and an M.A. in Canadian studies and international economics from the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies at the Johns Hopkins University, where he is currently pursuing a doctorate in international relations and economics.

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Samuel Wells is Associate Director of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and Director of West European Studies. He has served as Director of the Center’s Working Group on Global Finance and of its International Security Studies Program. He has also been a consultant to the Office of the Secretary of Defense, and Associate Professor of History at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. He has written or edited several books, including The Quest for Sustained Growth: Southeast Asian and Southeast European Cases (Woodrow Wilson Center Press, 1999), New European Orders, 1919 and 1991 (Woodrow Wilson Center Press, 1996) and Limiting Nuclear Proliferation (Ballinger, 1990). He is a Hoover Institution Peace Fellow and also a Visiting Scholar at the Institute français des relations internationales. Dr. Wells holds degrees from the University of North Carolina and Harvard University.

Email your comments and questions to our panelists! Click here.
Click here to watch a LIVE webcast of the conference.
(Download the free RealPlayer software here.)
ProgramProspectusPapers
Register online

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