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2016 G7 Ise-Shima Summit
Interim Compliance Report

29 May 2016 to 19 February 2017
Sarah Beard, Sophia Glisch, Humayun Ahmed, Katie Andrews and Sohaib Ahmed
with Brittaney Warren and Emily Scrivens
G7 Research Group

15 April 2017

The 2016 G7 Ise-Shima Summit Interim Compliance Report reviews progress made on 11 selected commitments set out at the 2016 Ise-Shima Summit for the period of 29 May 2016 to 31 January 2017 (see Table A). The preface and summary of the findings are listed below. The 2016 G7 Ise-Shima Interim Compliance Scores, with rankings by country and by issue. Note that eight of the 11 commitments received feedback from stakeholders.

Download the full 188-page report here.

The report contains the following sections, which can be downloaded separately:

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Preface

Each year since 1996, the G7 and G8 Research Group has produced a compliance report on the progress made by the G7/8 members in meeting the commitments their leaders issue at each summit. Since 2002, the group has usually published an interim report to assess progress during the transition from one host to the next, as well as the final report issued just before the annual summit. These reports, which monitor each G7/8 member's implementation of a carefully chosen selection of the many commitments announced at the end of each summit, are offered to the general public and to policy makers, academics, civil society, the media and interested citizens around the world in an effort to make the work of the G7/8 more transparent and accessible, and to provide scientific data to enable meaningful analysis of this unique and informal institution. Compliance reports are available at the G7 Information Centre at www.g7.utoronto.ca/compliance.

Based at the University of Toronto and founded in 1987, the mission of the G7 and G8 Research Group is to serve as the leading independent source of information and analysis on the institutions, performance, issues and participants of the G7/8 summit and system of global governance. It is an global network of scholars, students and professionals. The group oversees the G7 Information Centre, which publishes freely available research on the G7/8 as well as official documents issued by the G7/8.

For the compliance report on the 2016 Ise-Shima Summit, hosted by Japan from 26 to 27 May 2016, 19 priority commitments were selected from the total 376 commitments made. This version of the interim report includes assessments for 11 of those commitments as of 31 January 2017 and includes stakeholder feedback on eight of them.

To make its assessments, the G7 Research Group relies on publicly available information, documentation and media reports. To ensure the accuracy, comprehensiveness and integrity of these reports, we encourage comments and suggestions. Indeed, this is a living document, and the scores can be recalibrated if new material becomes available. All feedback remains anonymous and is not attributed. Responsibility for this report's contents lies exclusively with the report's authors and the analysts of the G7 Research Group.

This report is produced entirely on a voluntary basis. It receives no direct financial support from any source, by a process insulated from the other major activities of the G7 Research Group, such as the "background book" produced by Newsdesk Media or the pre-summit conferences sponsored by various institutions.

The work of the G7 Research Group would not be possible without the steadfast dedication of many people around the world. This report is the product of a team of energetic and hard-working analysts led by Sarah Beard, chair of summit studies, as well as the co-directors of the Compliance Unit: Sophia Glisch, Humayun Ahmed, Katie Andrews and Emily Scrivens. It would also not be possible without the support of Dr. Ella Kokotsis, director of accountability, and Brittaney Warren, senior researcher. We are also indebted to the many people who provide feedback on our drafts, whose comments have been carefully considered in this report.

John Kirton
Director
G7 Research Group

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Executive Summary

The University of Toronto G7 Research Group's Interim Compliance Report on the 2016 Ise-Shima Summit assesses the compliance of the G7 members with 19 priority commitments of the 376 commitments they made at their summit in Japan on 26-27 May 2016 (See Table A). These selected commitments reflect the breadth of the summit agenda. The analysis covers actions taken by G7 members since 28 May 2016, the day after the summit, until 31 January 2017. Eight of the 11 commitments included here have received stakeholder feedback. The final compliance report, which will be released on the eve of the 2017 Taormina Summit in May 2017, will assess compliance over the full year between May 2016 and May 2017.

The Interim Compliance Score

Compliance is measured on a three-point scale. A score of +1 indicates full compliance with a commitment, a score of 0 indicates partial compliance or a work in progress, and a score of −1 indicates non-compliance as in a failure to comply or action taken that is directly opposite to the commitment.

The average interim compliance scores are listed in Table B.

For the assessment period of 28 May 2016 to 31 January 2017, the average compliance score for these eight commitments was +0.51 (76%), a decrease from the interim score of +60 (80%) and final score of +0.65 (83%) for the 2015 Schloss Elmau Summit. It is also a decrease from the final score of +0.63 (82%) for the 2014 Brussels Summit.

Compliance by Member

The European Union received the highest compliance score of +0.91 (95%), followed by the United States at +0.82 (91%) and the United Kingdom at +0.64 (82%) (see Table C). Japan and Italy with +0.18 (59%) each had the lowest score.

Compliance by Commitment

The commitment on the Paris Agreement on Climate Change ranked first at +1.00 (100%) followed by the commitment on cyber stability at +0.88 (94%) and the combat against terrorist financing at +0.75 (88%) (see Table D). The two lowest-scoring commitments were on corruption and judicial reform in Ukraine at +0.25 (63%) and the non-proliferation of weapons of mass destruction at 0 (50%).

The Compliance Gap Between Members

TThese initial results from the Ise-Shima Summit show a difference of 0.73 between the highest and lowest compliance scores. This gap is smaller than the gap at the same midway point between the 2014 and 2015 summits, although much higher than earlier years. The final spread for the 2015 summit was 0.71.

Future Research and Reports

The information contained within this report provides G7 members and other stakeholders with an indication of their compliance with 11 commitments during the 2016–17 period, which spans from 28 May 2016, immediately following the 2016 Ise-Shima Summit, to 31 January 2017. As with previous compliance reports, this report has been produced as an invitation for others to provide additional or more complete information on country compliance. Comments are always welcomed and would be considered as part of an analytical reassessment, especially with regard to the three comments that have not received stakeholder feedback. Please send your comments to g8@utoronto.ca.

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Table A: 2016 Ise-Shima Summit Priority Commitments Selected for Assessment*

Number

Commitment

25 "The G7, continuing to take a leadership role, commits to taking the necessary steps to secure ratification, acceptance or approval of the [Paris] agreement as soon as possible and calls on all Parties to do so striving for a goal of entry into force in 2016." (G7 Ise-Shima Leaders' Declaration)
56 "We recognize that strengthening capacity of developing countries in tax policy and administration is indispensable to level the global playing field.] To enhance both quantity and quality of assistances in this area, we are committed to the principles of the Addis Tax Initiative along with encouraging other countries to make a similar commitment, and we request that the Platform for Collaboration on Tax be actively utilized to provide an opportunity where developing and developed countries and relevant organizations can share information and knowledge on a regular basis." (G7 Ise-Shima Leaders' Declaration)
66 "We are committed to applying the necessary political will to reach a TTIP agreement as early as this year, provided that it is ambitious, comprehensive, high standard and mutually beneficial, with a view to harnessing the full potential of the transatlantic economy as soon as possible." (G7 Ise-Shima Leaders' Declaration)
74 "[Recent outbreaks of Ebola and Zika underscore the imperative to improve prevention of, detection of and response to public health emergencies, whether naturally occurring, deliberate or accidental.] In that respect, we remain committed to advancing compliance with the WHO's IHR objectives including through the Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA)." (G7 Ise-Shima Leaders' Declaration)
97 "We commit to promote a strategic framework of international cyber stability consisting of the applicability of existing international law to state behavior in cyberspace, the promotion of voluntary norms of responsible state behavior during peacetime, and the development and the implementation of practical cyber confidence building measures between states." (G7 Ise-Shima Leaders' Declaration)
107 "We reassert our commitment to countering terrorist financing as declared in the G7 Action Plan on Combatting the Financing of Terrorism at the G7 Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors' meeting in Sendai." (G7 Ise-Shima Leaders' Declaration)
125 "We are committed to supporting displaced persons and their host communities and to working towards a long-term, sustainable post-conflict stabilization and rehabilitation of Syria and to eradicating conditions conducive to violent extremism." (G7 Ise-Shima Leaders' Declaration)
131 "[We urge Ukraine to maintain and enhance the momentum in its fight against corruption and its judicial reform, including the Prosecutor General's office.] We are fully committed to providing long-term support to this end." (G7 Ise-Shima Leaders' Declaration)
152 "We remain committed to the universalization of the treaties and conventions relevant to, amongst others, preventing and combating the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, in particular the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, the Chemical Weapons Convention and the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention." (G7 Ise-Shima Leaders' Declaration on Non-proliferation and Disarmament)
188 Building on the G7 Broad Food Security and Nutrition Development Approach, we endorse the G7 Vision for Action on Food Security and Nutrition, which outlines collective actions in the priority areas of: (i) empowering women; (ii) improving nutrition through a people-centered approach that recognizes the diverse food security challenges people face across the rural to urban spectrum; and (iii) ensuring sustainability and resilience within agriculture and food systems." (G7 Ise-Shima Summit Leaders' Declaration)
283 "Towards this end, the G7 will work individually and collectively to advance our shared priorities through relevant international fora including the Conference of State Parties to the United Nations Convention against Corruption (UNCAC) and its subsidiary bodies, the OECD as well as promoting implementation of the Declaration Against Corruption adopted at the Anti-Corruption Summit hosted by the United Kingdom on May 12, and the ministerial declaration adopted at the OECD Anti-Bribery Ministerial Meeting on March 16." (G7 Ise-Shima Leaders' Declaration on G7 Action to Fight Corruption)

* For the full list of commitments, please contact the G7 Research Group at g8@utoronto.ca.

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Table B: 2016 Ise-Shima Summit Interim Compliance Scores

    Canada France Germany Italy Japan United Kingdom United States European Union Average
1 Trade: Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership 0 −1 +1 +1 0 0 +1 +1 +0.38 69%
2 Development: Addis Tax Initiative 0 0 +1 0 0 +1 +1 +1 +0.50 75%
3 Food and Agriculture: G7 Vision for Action on Food Security and Nutrition 0 0 +1 0 0 +1 +1 +1 +0.50 75%
4 Crime and Corruption: International Cooperation on Anti-Corruption Initiatives 0 +1 0 0 0 0 +1 +1 +0.38 69%
5 Terrorism: Combatting terrorist financing +1 +1 0 +1 0 +1 +1 +1 +0.75 88%
6 Syria: Refugees +1 +1 +1 0 0 +1 0 +1 +0.63 81%
7 Non-proliferation: Weapons of mass destruction 0 0 0 0 0 −1 0 +1 0.00 50%
8 International cyber stability +1 +1 +1 0 +1 +1 +1 +1 +0.88 94%
9 Climate Change: Paris Agreement +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1.00
+0.38
100%
69%
10 Health: Global Health Security Agenda +1 0 0 0 0 +1 +1 0
11 Ukraine: Corruption and judicial reform +1 −1 0 −1 0 +1 +1 +1 +0.25 63%
Compliance Average +0.55 +0.27 +0.55 +0.18 +0.18 +0.64 +0.82 +0.91 +0.51 76%
77% 64% 77% 59% 59% 82% 91% 95% 76%  
 
2015 Final Compliance Average +0.38 +0.67 +0.86 +0.24 +0.48 +0.86 +0.81 +0.95 +0.65 83%
2015 Interim Compliance Average +0.18 +0.59 +0.88 +0.18 +0.47 +0.88 +0.65 +1.00 +0.60 80%
  2014 Final Compliance Average +0.69 +0.50 +0.75 +0.38 +0.44 +0.75 +0.75 +0.81 +0.63 82%
  2013 Final Compliance Average +0.50 +0.50 +0.39 +0.33 +0.33 +0.78 +0.72 +0.61 +0.51 76%
  2013 Interim Compliance Average +0.44 +0.44 +0.28 +0.28 +0.17 +0.56 +0.61 +0.61 +0.40 70%
  2012 Final Compliance Average +0.71 +0.65 +0.76 +0.29 +0.65 +0.65 +0.88 +0.59 +0.60 80%
2011 Final Compliance Average +0.67 +0.50 +0.44 +0.33 +0.56 +0.61 +0.61 +0.61 +0.54 77%

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Table C: 2016 Ise-Shima Summit Compliance Scores by Country

2016
interim
2015
final
2015
interim
2014
final
2013
final
2013
interim
2012
interim
2011
final
Russia +0.39 70% +0.22 61% +0.18 59% +0.56 78%
European Union +0.91 95% +0.95 98% +1.00 100% +0.81 91% +0.61 81% +0.61 81% +0.59 80% +0.61 81%
United States +0.82 91% +0.81 90% +0.65 82% +0.75 88% +0.72 86% +0.61 81% +0.88 94% +0.61 81%
United Kingdom +0.64 82% +0.86 93% +0.88 94% +0.75 88% +0.78 89% +0.56 78% +0.65 83% +0.61 81%
Germany +0.55 77% +0.86 93% +0.88 94% +0.75 88% +0.39 70% +0.28 64% +0.76 88% +0.44 72%
Canada +0.55 77% +0.38 69% +0.18 59% +0.69 85% +0.50 75% +0.44 72% +0.71 86% +0.67 84%
France +0.27 64% +0.67 83% +0.59 79% +0.50 75% +0.50 75% +0.44 72% +0.65 83% +0.50 75%
Italy +0.18 59% +0.24 62% +0.18 59% +0.38 69% +0.33 67% +0.28 64% +0.29 65% +0.33 67%
Japan +0.18 59% +0.48 74% +0.47 74% +0.44 72% +0.33 67% +0.17 59% +0.65 83% +0.56 78%
Average +0.51 76% +0.65 83% +0.60 80% +0.63 82% +0.52 76% +0.42 71% +0.65 82% +0.54 77%
Spread 0.73 0.71 0.82 0.44 0.45 0.44 0.70 0.34

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Table D: 2016 Ise-Shima Summit Compliance Scores by Issue

1 Climate Change: Paris Agreement +1.00 100%
2 International cyber stability +0.88 94%
3 Terrorism: Combatting terrorist financing +0.75 88%
4 Syria: Refugees +0.63 81%
5 Development: Addis Tax Initiative +0.50 75%
Food and Agriculture: G7 Vision for Action on Food Security and Nutrition +0.50 75%
7 Trade: Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership +0.38 69%
Health: Global Health Security Agenda +0.38 69%
Crime and Corruption: International Cooperation on Anti-corruption Initiatives +0.38 69%
10 Ukraine: Corruption and judicial reform +0.25 63%
11 Non-proliferation: Weapons of mass destruction 0 50%
  Average +0.51 76%

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