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2021 G7 Cornwall Summit Interim Compliance Report

14 June 2021 to 1 February 2022
Matthew Kieffer and Gabrielle Regimbal
and the G7 Research Group

20 March 2022

The 2021 G7 Cornwall Summit Interim Compliance Report reviews progress made on 22 selected commitments made by G7 leaders at the 2021 Cornwall Summit hosted by the United Kingdom on 11-13 June 2021 at Carbis Bay in Cornwall. It covers actions taken by G7 members during the period of 14 June 2021 to 1 February 2022 (see Table A). The preface and summary of the findings are listed below, with rankings by country and by issue.

Download the full 549-page report here.

The report contains the following sections, which can be downloaded separately:

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Introduction

This compliance report begins with the 2021 Cornwall Summit hosted by the United Kingdom on 11-13 June 2021, which was the first in-person summit with a full-strength agenda since the G7 leaders met in Biarritz in August 2019. It assesses actions taken by the G7 members to fulfil 22 priority commitments of the 429 commitments made at Cornwall during the period of 14 June 2021 to 1 February 2022.

To conduct these assessments, researchers rely on publicly available information, documentation and media reports of actions taken beginning the day after the summit.

The G7 Research Group has been producing annual compliance reports since 1996. It began publishing interim reports in 2002 to assess progress at the time of the transition from the outgoing G7 presidency to the incoming presidency each 1 January. These reports are offered to the general public and to policy makers, academics, civil society, the media and interested citizens around the world in an effort to make the work of the G7 more transparent and accessible, and to provide scientific data to enable meaningful analysis of the impact of this unique informal international institution.

Based at the University of Toronto and founded in 1987, the G7 Research Group strives to be the leading independent source of information and analysis on the institutions, performance, issues and participants of the G7 summit and system of global governance. It is a global network of scholars, students and professionals. The group oversees the G7 Information Centre, which publishes freely available research on the G7 as well as official documents issued by the G7.

This report is produced entirely on a voluntary basis. It receives no direct financial support from any source. It comes from a process entirely insulated from the other major activities of the G7 Research Group, such as its pre-summit conferences sponsored by various institutions or the "background books" produced GT Media.

To ensure the accuracy, comprehensiveness and integrity of these reports, comments and suggestions are always welcome. Indeed, this is a living document, and the scores can be recalibrated if new material becomes available. All feedback remains anonymous and is never attributed. Responsibility for this report's contents lies exclusively with the report's authors and the analysts of the G7 Research Group.

The work of the G7 Research Group would not be possible without the steadfast dedication of many people around the world. This report is the product of a team of energetic and hard-working analysts led by Matthew Kieffer and Gabrielle Regimbal, co-chairs of summit studies, Brandon Yih, editor, and their team of compliance directors, lead analysts and analysts. It would also not be possible without the efforts of Professor John Kirton, director of the G7 Research Group, Brittaney Warren, director of compliance studies, Dr. Ella Kokotsis, director of accountability, and Madeline Koch, executive director. We are also indebted to the many people who provide feedback on our drafts, whose comments are always carefully considered in the published report.

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Summary

The G7 Research Group's Interim Compliance Report on the 2021 Cornwall Summit assesses the compliance of the G7 members with 22 priority commitments selected from the total of 429 they made on 13 June 2021, based on members' implementing actions taken between 14 June 2021 and 1 February 2022 (see Table A). This selection reflects the breadth and focus of the summit's agenda, focusing on three main pillars for a holistic recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic including health, climate change and trade. It is also notable that this was the first in-person G7 summit since the US-hosted virtual summit on 16 March 2020.

The 2021 Cornwall Summit agenda marked a return to coverage of the usual issues addressed by the G7. This again signifies a return of normalcy from the unusual circumstances of the 2020 US Virtual Summit, which addressed the unusual challenges of the global pandemic.

The previous compliance reports are available for review here.

The Interim Compliance Score

Compliance is measured on a three-point scientific scale. A score of +1 (100%) indicates full compliance with a commitment, a score of 0 (50%) indicates partial compliance or a work in progress, and a score of −1 (0%) indicates non-compliance or a failure to comply or action taken that is counter to the commitment. Table B contains the interim compliance scores.

For the period of 14 June 2021 to 1 February 2022, average compliance for the 22 commitments assessed is +0.69 (85%). This is a decrease from the interim score of the 2020 Virtual Summit with +0.86 (93%) but higher than the final 2020 score of +0.58 (79%). The 2021 interim score is also higher than the 2019 Biarritz final score of +0.58 (79%) and the 2018 Charlevoix Summit final score of +0.66 (83%).

Table C contains the scores from previous years.

Compliance by Member

Germany, the United States and the European Union ranked first with an average compliance score of +0.82 (91%), followed by Canada and the United Kingdom at +0.77 (89%), France and Japan at +0.59 (80%) and Italy at +0.36 (68%). This is a different configuration from the 2020 interim compliance report where the European Union was the sole highest scoring member. In the 2020 interim compliance report Italy was also the lowest scoring member. See Table C.

Compliance by Commitment

Of the 22 commitments assessed, three had compliance of +1.00 (100%). These commitments were on different topics including environment, development and gender. Two commitments had the lowest compliance of +0.13 (56%). These commitments were on democracy and crime and corruption. See Table D.

The Compliance Gap Between Members

These interim results from the 2021 Cornwall Summit show a difference of 0.45 between the highest and lowest compliance scores of members.

Future Research and Reports

The information contained within this report provides G7 members and other stakeholders with an indication of the G7 members' compliance with 22 commitments for the period beginning immediately after the 2021 Cornwall Summit on 14 June 2021 until 1 February 2022. As with previous compliance reports, this report has been produced as an invitation for others to provide additional or more complete information on G7 members' compliance. Comments are always welcomed and would be considered as part of an analytical reassessment. Please send your feedback to g7@utoronto.ca.

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Table A: 2021 Cornwall Summit Priority Commitments Selected for Assessment*

 

Commitment

1

"Recognising the urgent need to speed up delivery of doses, we are committing to share at least 870 million doses directly over the next year."

2

"[Emphasising the need for equitable access to COVID-19 vaccines,] we will support manufacturing in low income countries."

3

"We pledge to lead the way in building a resilient, integrated and inclusive global health system prepared and equipped to prevent the causes and escalation of disease, and to detect emerging health threats quickly."

4

"We agree to support a robust global recovery from COVID-19, ensuring that countries are able to effectively address the indirect impacts on physical and mental health and broader socio-economic consequences of the pandemic."

5

"We commit to accelerate the transition away from new sales of diesel and petrol cars to promote the uptake of zero emission vehicles."

6

"In our agricultural, forestry and other land use sectors, we commit to ensuring our policies encourage sustainable production, the protection, conservation, and regeneration of ecosystems and the sequestration of carbon."

7

"Stepping up our efforts at home and overseas to counter crimes that affect the environment: we will recognise and tackle illicit threats to nature such as the illegal wildlife trade (IWT) as serious organised crimes, including intensifying efforts to combat money laundering of the criminal proceeds of these crimes."

8

"We will support and drive the protection, conservation and restoration of ecosystems critical to halt and reverse biodiversity loss and environmental degradation, and to tackle climate change."

9

"Addressing the adverse impact of human activity, such as litter and unsustainable fishing practices, on the marine environment: building on the Osaka Blue Ocean Vision, we will accelerate action to tackle the increasing levels of plastic pollution in the ocean from all sources - land and marine - including by working through the UN Environment Assembly on options including strengthening existing instruments and a potential new global agreement or other instrument to address marine plastic litter, including at UNEA-5."

10

"[In our energy sectors, we will]…accelerate renewable and other zero emissions energy deployment."

11

"[To accelerate the international transition away from coal, recognising that continued global investment in unabated coal power generation is incompatible with keeping 1.5°C within reach we stress that international investments in unabated coal must stop now and] we commit now to an end to new direct government support for unabated international thermal coal power generation by the end of 2021, including through Official Development Assistance, export finance, investment, and financial and trade promotion support."

12

"Secure our future prosperity by championing freer, fairer trade within a reformed trading system."

13

"We will do this in a way that values the individual and promotes equality, especially gender equality, including by supporting a target to get 40 million more girls into education and with at least $2¾ billion for the Global Partnership for Education."

14

"With regard to China, and competition in the global economy, we will continue to consult on collective approaches to challenging non-market policies and practices which undermine the fair and transparent operation of the global economy."

15

"[As democratic societies we support global institutions in their efforts to]…[address]…instability."

16

"A central focus of our new strategic approach will be supporting sustainable growth in Africa."

17

"We will develop a new partnership to build back better for the world, through a step change in our approach to investment for infrastructure, including through an initiative for clean and green growth."

18

"We commit to continue to work together including through our own available domestic means and multilateral institutions to protect individuals from forced labour."

19

"We commit to preserve an open, interoperable, reliable and secure internet, one that is unfragmented, supports freedom, innovation and trust which empowers people."

20

"We will continue to support our economies for as long as is necessary, shifting the focus of our support from crisis response to promoting strong, resilient, sustainable, balanced and inclusive growth into the future."

21

"Collaborate on science-based responses to global challenges and drive innovation by calling on every nation to increase their research transparency and integrity."

22

"As our nations and communities start to recover from the pandemic and build resilience for future shocks, we will continue to work with our research and business communities to remove barriers to the open and rapid sharing of knowledge, data and tools, to the greatest extent possible, recognising the importance of research security in particular in cutting-edge fields."

* For the full list of commitments, please contact the G7 Research Group at g7@utoronto.ca.

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Table B: 2021 G7 Cornwall Summit Interim Compliance Scores

Commitment

Canada

France

Germany

Italy

Japan

United Kingdom

United States

European Union

Average

1

Health: Vaccines

+1

+1

+1

0

+1

0

+1

+1

+0.75

88%

2

Health: Vaccine Equity

0

+1

+1

0

+1

+1

+1

+1

+0.75

88%

3

Health: Disease Prevention

+1

+1

+1

0

+1

0

+1

+1

+0.75

88%

4

Health: Indirect Impacts of COVID-19

+1

0

+1

+1

0

+1

+1

+1

+0.75

88%

5

Climate Change: Zero Emission Vehicles

+1

+1

+1

+1

0

+1

0

+1

+0.75

88%

6

Agriculture, Forestry and Land Use

+1

+1

+1

0

−1

+1

+1

+1

+0.63

81%

7

Crime and Corruption: Environmental Crime

0

0

+1

0

−1

0

+1

+1

+0.25

63%

8

Environment: Biodiversity Loss

+1

+1

+1

+1

+1

+1

+1

+1

+1.00

100%

9

Environment: Marine Health and Litter

0

0

0

0

+1

0

0

0

+0.13

56%

10

Energy: Renewables

+1

+1

+1

0

+1

+1

+1

+1

+0.88

94%

11

Energy: Coal

+1

+1

+1

0

0

+1

+1

+1

+0.75

88%

12

Trade: Free trade

+1

0

0

0

+1

+1

+1

+1

+0.63

81%

13

Gender: Education Equality

+1

+1

+1

+1

+1

+1

+1

+1

+1.00

100%

14

Democracy: China

0

0

0

−1

0

+1

+1

0

+0.13

56%

15

Regional Security: Addressing Instability

+1

0

+1

+1

+1

+1

+1

+1

+0.88

94%

16

Development: Sustainable Growth in Africa

+1

+1

+1

+1

+1

+1

+1

+1

+1.00

100%

17

Infrastructure: Build Back Better

0

+1

+1

+1

+1

+1

+1

+1

+0.88

94%

18

Human Rights: Forced Labour

+1

0

+1

+1

+1

+1

+1

0

+0.75

88%

19

Digital Economy: Open Internet

+1

0

+1

0

+1

+1

+1

+1

+0.75

88%

20

Macroeconomics: Growth

+1

+1

+1

0

+1

0

+1

+1

+0.75

88%

21

International Cooperation: Transparency

+1

0

0

0

0

+1

0

+1

+0.38

69%

22

International Cooperation: Knowledge Sharing

+1

+1

+1

+1

+1

+1

0

0

+0.75

88%

2021 Interim Compliance Average

+0.77

  +0.59

+0.82

+0.36

+0.59

+0.77

+0.82

+0.82

+0.69

85%

89%

80%

91%

68%

80%

89%

91%

91%

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Table C: 2021 G7 Cornwall Summit Interim Compliance Scores by Member

 

2021
interim

2020
final

2020
interim

2019
final

2019 2nd interim

2019 1st interim

2018
final

2018
interim

2017
final

2017
interim

European Union

+0.82

91%

+0.71

86%

+0.95

98%

+0.71

86%

+0.67

83%

+0.52

76%

+0.90

95%

+0.85

93%

+0.95

98%

+0.94

97%

Germany

+0.82

91%

+0.81

91%

+0.90

95%

+0.86

93%

+0.76

88%

+0.48

74%

+0.50

75%

+0.40

70%

+0.63

82%

+0.44

72%

United States

+0.82

91%

+0.29

65%

+0.85

93%

+0.29

64%

+0.19

60%

+0.05

53%

+0.47

74%

+0.24

62%

+0.17

59%

+0.13

57%

Canada

+0.77

89%

+0.62

81%

+0.80

90%

+0.62

81%

+0.48

74%

+0.05

53%

+0.80

90%

+0.70

85%

+0.68

84%

+0.44

72%

United Kingdom

+0.77

89%

+0.86

93%

+0.85

93%

+0.81

90%

+0.76

88%

+0.43

72%

+0.85

93%

+0.70

85%

+0.84

92%

+0.56

78%

France

+0.59

80%

+0.67

84%

+0.90

95%

+0.67

83%

+0.67

83%

+0.33

67%

+0.65

83%

+0.45

73%

+0.68

84%

+0.50

75%

Japan

+0.59

80%

+0.48

74%

+0.85

93%

+0.48

74%

+0.38

69%

+0.38

69%

+0.68

84%

+0.58

79%

+0.47

74%

+0.25

63%

Italy

+0.36

68%

+0.19

60%

+0.75

88%

+0.19

60%

+0.10

55%

-0.29

36%

+0.50

75%

+0.15

58%

+0.37

69%

+0.31

66%

Average

+0.68

84%

+0.58

79%

+0.86

93%

+0.58

79%

+0.50

75%

+0.24

62%

+0.66

83%

+0.51

75%

+0.59

80%

+0.44

72%

Spread

0.45

 

0.67

 

0.10

 

0.67

 

0.67

 

0.81

 

0.45

 

0.7

 

0.78

 

0.19

 

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Table D: 2021 G7 Cornwall Summit Interim Compliance Scores by Issue

Commitment

Score

Development: Sustainable Growth in Africa

+1.00

100%

Environment: Halting and Reversing Biodiversity Loss

+1.00

100%

Gender: Education Equality

+1.00

100%

Energy: Renewables

+0.88

94%

Infrastructure: Build Back Better

+0.88

94%

Regional Security: Addressing Instability

+0.88

94%

Climate Change: Zero Emission Vehicles

+0.75

88%

Digital Economy: Open Internet

+0.75

88%

Energy: Coal

+0.75

88%

Health: Disease Prevention

+0.75

88%

Health: Indirect Impacts of COVID-19

+0.75

88%

Health: Vaccine Equity

+0.75

88%

Health: Vaccines

+0.75

88%

Human Rights: Forced Labour

+0.75

88%

International Cooperation: Research and Knowledge Sharing

+0.75

88%

Macroeconomics: Strong, Resilient, Sustainable, Balanced and Inclusive Growth

+0.75

88%

Trade: Free Trade

+0.63

81%

International Cooperation: Research Transparency

+0.38

69%

Crime and Corruption: Environmental Crime

+0.25

63%

Democracy: China

+0.13

56%

Environment: Marine Health and Litter

+0.13

56%

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