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G7 Foreign Ministers' Commitments, 1998-2018

Brittaney Warren, G7 Research Group
April 24, 2017
N=1,218

The following document lists the commitments articulated in the statements issued by G7 and G8 foreign ministers from 1998 to 2018, as identified by the G7 Research Group.

Summit Number of commitments
1998 London 62
1999 Germany 25
2000 Japan 85
2001 Italy 32
2002 Canada 71
2003 France 5
2004 United States 8
2005 United Kingdom 23
2006 Russia 12
2007 Germany 38
2008 Japan 28
2009 Italy 55
2010 Canada 33
2011 France 39
2012 United States 37
2013United Kingdom 52
2014 United States 15
2015 Germany 164
2016 Japan 115
2017 Italy 180
2018 Canada 138
Total 1,218
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1998, London UK

N=62

Conclusions of the Joint G8 Foreign and Finance Ministers

May 9, London

Development

1998-1: We agreed to work in the OECD Development Assistance Committee, to promote more flexible funding of aid and technical assistance programmes to developing countries, programmed in partnership with recipient countries.

1998-2: [We agreed to work in the] IMF/IBRD Development Committee [to promote more flexible funding of aid and technical assistance programmes to developing countries, programmed in partnership with recipient countries.]

1998-3: [We agreed to work in the] Special Programme for Africa [to promote more flexible funding of aid and technical assistance programmes to developing countries, programmed in partnership with recipient countries.]

1998-4: We will also work to help countries to develop sustainable public expenditure plans and build capacity to manage them in a transparent and accountable way;

1998-5: We stressed the importance of more developing countries making the necessary reforms to attract flows of foreign direct investment and to mobilise additional domestic resources. To this end we agreed to:

1998-6: support countries seeking to create a business environment that encourages stable and productive private flows, in particular through education and training

1998-7: [support countries seeking to create a business environment that encourages stable and productive private flows, in particular through] institution building and improvement in legal systems

1998-8: [support countries seeking to create a business environment that encourages stable and productive private flows, in particular through] other aspects of social and economic infrastructure;

1998-9: encourage more innovative use of multilateral and bilateral investment guarantees, consistent with improving the efficiency of capital markets.

1998-10: [We emphasised the value of regional integration among developing countries that wish to pursue it, particularly in Africa, where many countries suffer from small and fragmented markets and poor transport facilities.] We remain ready to support this process with technical assistance.

1998-11: [We recognise the particular trade problems of the least developed countries. We stress the importance of effective implementation of the WTO plan of action for the least developed countries, including programmes of integrated technical assistance.] We will keep progress under review at the WTO Ministerial.

1998-12: We will also support efforts of all developing countries, particularly those being made in Africa, to promote good governance and participatory development and to fight corruption, including through the development of operational codes,

1998-13: [We will also support efforts of all developing countries, particularly those being made in Africa to] create regional groupings to combat money laundering.

Electronic Commerce

1998-14: We will work with the international institutions and the private sector to offer the best opportunities for the future: a predictable and stable environment and a seamless, decentralised global market place where competition and consumer choice drive economic activity.

[We] encourage:

1998-15: removal of inappropriate and unnecessary legal barriers to the electronic conduct of business;

1998-16: taxation to be technology neutral. It should neither stifle commercial opportunities by creating unnecessary barriers nor provide increased scope for tax avoidance and evasion. International co-operation through the OECD is essential;

1998-17: the international institutions and the private sector to accelerate the development of global frameworks, to promote competition;

1998-18: [the international institutions and the private sector to accelerate the development of global frameworks, to] protect privacy, consumer interests and intellectual property;

1998-19: [the international institutions and the private sector to accelerate the development of global frameworks, to] encompass the use of electronic authentication facilitating contracting over the Internet;

1998-20: [the international institutions and the private sector to accelerate the development of global frameworks, to] include the promotion of open and internationally agreed standards;

1998-21: rapid progress in the work of UNCITRAL on electronic authentication

1998-22: [rapid progress in the work of] the OECD on the implementation of the cryptography policy guidelines;

1998-23: public administration to use electronic means to deliver programmes and services,

1998-24: promoting progress in the WTO Working Group on Transparency in Government Procurement

1998-25: the reform of the WTO Government Procurement Agreement

1998-26: pushing forward the work on trade facilitation in the WTO and elsewhere;

1998-27: governments to involve business and consumers in this work to ensure that any proposals are practical and take into account the demands of the market place.

G8 Action Programme on Forests

May 9

II. Monitoring and Assessment

The G8 members will:

1998-28: monitor and assess the state of their own forests using agreed national level criteria and indicators for sustainable forest management and make the results, including areas where additional information is needed, available to interested parties;

1998-29: drawing on national level assessments, provide information and data to the Food and Agriculture Organisation's global forest resource assessments and particularly Forest Resource Assessment 2000;

1998-30: work with partner countries to build national capacity to: participate in regional criteria and indicator processes

1998-31: [work with partner countries to build national capacity to:] develop and apply agreed criteria and indicators to monitor and assess the state of their own forests

1998-32: [work with partner countries to build national capacity to:] develop national forest inventory and monitoring systems which take account of these criteria and indicators

1998-33: [work with partner countries to build national capacity to:] improve scientific underpinning of the economic, social and environmental indicators of sustainable forest management;

1998-34: [work with partner countries to build national capacity to:] improve access to remote sensing data and geographic information processing technologies, including geographical information systems (GIS) and global positioning systems (GPS), to groups and organisations with an interest;

1998-35: [work with partner countries to build national capacity to:] exchange information and experience with partner countries on monitoring and responding to large scale disasters affecting forest ecosystems, such as forest fires.

III. National Forest Programmes

The G-8 members will:

1998-36: share their experience in developing and implementing their national programmes to promote sustainable forest management and encourage partner countries to develop their own national forest programmes;

1998-37: focus technical and financial assistance on those partner countries which give priority to sustainable forest management in the programming of their overseas development assistance (ODA);

1998-38: support partner countries in the elaboration and implementation of their national forest programmes, including by supporting new approaches, initiatives and partnerships that promote sustainable forest management;

1998-39: work to improve a global understanding and recognition of the role of boreal and temperate forests as important carbon sinks, biodiversity reservoirs and sources of other goods and services, in support of national forest programmes and the sustainable management of these forests;

1998-40: identify and support international initiatives which contribute to sustainable forest management, such as the pioneering work of the International Tropical Timber Organisation in respect of tropical forests to achieve the Year 2000 Objective;

1998-41: further co-ordinate their in-country support to partner countries, within the framework of respective national forest programmes in support of the International Forum on Forests proposals for action, and urge international institutions, particularly the international financial institutions, to do likewise.

IV. Protected Areas

The G-8 members will:

1998-42: work in domestic, regional and international fora, such as the Convention on Biodiversity and International Forum on Forests, to achieve a broad consensus on categories of protected areas, their management and the biodiversity and other ecological values and benefits they bring to key stakeholders, drawing on the International Union for the Conservation of Nature 'Protected Area Management Categories' and related Food and Agriculture Organisation and other classification systems;

1998-43: on this basis, analyse and categorise their existing protected forest areas and identify their key forest types not sufficiently represented in the different categories of protection;

1998-44: also, on this basis, encourage the achievement of a global assessment of the effectiveness of protected forest areas in maintaining forest biodiversity and ecological values in co-operation with relevant organisations;

1998-45: work with partner countries to maintain and, where necessary, establish protected forest areas and associated networks, including border parks and other transnational and international initiatives, aimed at protecting important forest biodiversity and other ecological values, through for example innovative financial mechanisms, such as Joint Implementation, debt-for-nature swaps and public/private partnerships.

The G-8 members will:

1998-46: encourage the private sector, particularly forest-related industries, to develop and apply voluntary codes of conduct that support sustainable forest management, both domestically and internationally;

1998-47: further examine ways of promoting private investment and partnerships in sustainable forest management and the identification of innovative financing mechanisms to attract private sector finance;

1998-48: encourage private voluntary market-based mechanisms that would support improved management practices in the forest sector;

1998-49: share experiences with partner countries on ways in which they encourage the private sector to increase efficiencies and reduce waste in forest product processing and recycling;

1998-50: assist partner countries to develop a regulatory institutional and economic framework which encourages responsible domestic and foreign private sector investment and practices.

VI. Illegal Logging

The G-8 members will:

1998-51: encourage the sharing of information and assessments on the nature and extent of international trade in illegally harvested timber as a basis for developing practical and effective counter measures;

1998-52: identify and assist in implementing measures to improve economic information and market transparency regarding the international timber trade, including through International Forum on Forests and International Tropical Timber Organisation;

1998-53: identify and assess the effectiveness of their internal measures to control illegal logging and international trade in illegally harvested timber and identify areas needing improvement;

1998-54: take measures to implement their obligations under international agreements aimed at combating bribery and corruption in international business transactions as they pertain to trade in timber;

1998-55: work with interested partner countries and through international organisations including the International Tropical Timber Organisation to develop their own capacity to assess the nature and extent of illegal logging and trade in illegally harvested timber and their capacity to develop and implement counter measures.

Communiqué on Indian and Pakistani Nuclear Tests

June 12

1998-56: We pledge actively to encourage India and Pakistan to find mutually acceptable solutions to their problems and stand ready to assist India and Pakistan in pursuing any of these positive actions.

1998-57: We shall continue to apply firmly our respective policies to prevent the export of materials, equipment or technology that could in any way assist programmes in India or Pakistan for nuclear weapons or for ballistic missiles capable of delivering such weapons.

1998-58: We all, nuclear weapon states and non-nuclear weapon states alike, reiterate our determination to fulfil the commitments relating to nuclear disarmament under Article VI of the NPT.

1998-59: We do not wish to punish the peoples of India or Pakistan as a result of actions by their governments, and we will therefore not oppose loans by international financial institutions to the two countries to meet basic human needs.

1998-60: We agree, however, to work for a postponement in consideration of other loans in the World Bank and other international financial institutions to India and Pakistan, and to any other country that will conduct nuclear tests.

1998-61: We pledge to convey the common views of our Governments on these matters to those of India and Pakistan with a view to bringing about early and specific progress in the areas outlined above.

1998-62: We plan to keep developments under review and to continue the process of pursuing the goals on which we are all agreed.

1999, Germany

N=25

Conclusions

June 10

Human Security

As effective action against these threats, the G8 agrees to support:

1999-1: The protection of civilians and safeguarding of the rights of children in armed conflicts,

1999-2: Combating illicit small arms proliferation,

1999-3: Control of conventional arms transfers,

1999-4: Implementation of the Ottawa Convention on landmines,

1999-5: Combating organised crime, including by advancing the conventions for the suppression of terrorism financing and combating acts of nuclear terrorism.

1999-6: [Combating] drug trafficking and terrorism, [including by advancing the conventions for the suppression of terrorism financing and combating acts of nuclear terrorism.]

Conflict prevention

1999-7: On the eve of the new millennium, we will meet in Berlin in December 1999 on the initiative of the German Presidency to discuss conflict prevention and conflict resolution.

Non-proliferation and disarmament

1999-8: We remain committed to further enhancing the process of disarmament and strengthening the international non-proliferation regime and to ensure effective export control mechanisms.

1999-9: [We recognise the need for the safe and effective management of weapons-grade nuclear material designated as no longer required for defence purposes including plutonium disposition,] remain committed to continue our work on this issue and strongly support the corner initiatives undertaken to that end.

1999-10: We confirm the commitment of our countries to work for an early start to negotiations on a Fissile Material Cut-Off Treaty.

1999-11: We remain determined to ensure the early and successful conclusion to the negotiations on a legally-binding Protocol to strengthen the Biological and Toxin Weapons Conventions

Regional issues

1999-12: We reaffirm our full support for a negotiated comprehensive peace in the Middle East, based on the principles of land for peace, UNSCRs 242, 338 and 425 and the arrangements of Madrid and Oslo.

1999-13: We reiterate our support for the UN efforts to reach a comprehensive settlement on the Cyprus problem on the basis of the relevant Resolution of the UN Security Council.

Conclusions

December 16-17

1999-14: Regarding the growing risks of the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and their delivery means we remain committed to further strengthen the international arms control and non-proliferation regimes,

1999-15: [Regarding the growing risks of the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and their delivery means we remain committed to] ensure effective export control mechanisms

1999-16: [Regarding the growing risks of the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and their delivery means we remain committed to] to build international confidence.

Foreign Ministers agreed that the required approach should include work to address particularly the following issues:

1999-17: the destabilizing spread and accumulation of small arms;

1999-18: the part played by organized crime, trafficking of persons and drug trafficking in fuelling conflict;

1999-19: the use of children as soldiers, and the targeting of children in armed conflicts;

1999-20: mercenaries and private military activity;

1999-21: the illicit trade in certain high value commodities, in particular in diamonds;

1999-22: the role played by environmental issues in contributing to conflict;

1999-23: consideration of how G8 members might individually help ensure the implementation of financial and other measures, aimed at preventing armed conflict.

1999-24: We also decided to support the efforts by the UN and regional organizations, in particular the OSCE, to build civilian rapid reaction capabilities including training and deploying civilian police.

Chairman's Statement

December 16-17

1999-25: We stand ready to co-operate with Russia to the fullest extent possible to resolve the conflict.

July 12-13, 2000, Japan

N=85

Conclusions

2000-1: We reaffirm our commitment to human security through the creation of an environment where the dignity, well-being, safety and human rights of all people are ensured.

Global Issues

Conflict Prevention

2000-2: We reaffirmed our commitment in Berlin in December 1999 to a sustained effort to promote a "Culture of Prevention" throughout the global community and to develop conflict prevention initiatives.

2000-3: We will therefore continue to monitor carefully potential areas of armed conflict around the world.

2000-4: To follow up the Berlin meeting, we endorse the following measures, that are detailed in our separate document made public today:

2000-5: dealing with the uncontrolled and illegal transfer of small arms and light weapons, as well as their destabilizing accumulation, with a view to restricting the means for armed conflict, and achieving concrete results at the UN Conference in 2001

2000-6: ensuring that development policies are constructed so as to contribute to the elimination of potential causes of armed conflict

2000-7: addressing the illicit trade in diamonds, particularly those coming from conflict zones in Africa, which provide funds for those engaging in armed conflict

2000-8: addressing the impact of armed conflict on children including ending the use of children as soldiers

2000-9: addressing the importance of international civilian police (CIVPOL) as a critical element of conflict prevention

2000-10: we commit ourselves to continue to cooperate closely and further identify effective measures to prevent conflicts, including supporting the role of women, combating cyber crime and developing the principles of corporate citizenship in conflict prevention.

Disarmament, Non-Proliferation and Arms Control

2000-11: We stress the need to maintain and further strengthen the international non-proliferation regime.

2000-12: We remain committed to universal application and full implementation of the NPT, which is the cornerstone for global nuclear non-proliferation and the essential foundation for the pursuit of nuclear disarmament.

2000-13: In particular, we commit ourselves to cooperate to establish multilateral arrangements necessary for a coordinated and integrated program for the safe management and disposition of weapon grade plutonium no longer required for defence purposes

2000-14: [We welcome the Final Document of the NPT Review Conference urging the Conference on Disarmament to agree on the immediate commencement of negotiations on the Fissile Material Cut-Off Treaty with a view to their conclusion within five years.] We commit ourselves to work together to meet this goal.

2000-15: We will make utmost efforts with others to conclude the negotiations on a Protocol which will effectively strengthen the Biological Weapons Convention as early as possible in 2001.

2000-16: We agree on the need for the international community to increase the level of funding for the Russian chemical weapons destruction program as called for at the 5th Conference of the States Parties to the CWC.

2000-17: We will continue our efforts to address the issue. Adherence to the MTCR plays a key role in this respect.

2000-18: We are determined to support efforts, including those under the Ottawa Treaty, aimed at the total elimination of such landmines

2000-19: [we] [welcome the progress that has been made to date in mine clearance, humanitarian demining activities and stockpile destruction, and in the development of technologies for mine action.] We will continue encouraging these activities.

Terrorism

2000-20: We renew our commitment to fighting all forms of terrorism regardless of the perpetrator's motives.

2000-21: We commit our governments and our people to this struggle.

2000-22: [We furthermore emphasize that international counter-terrorism cooperation remains a key factor in defeating international terrorism] and will continue to work closely with other like-minded countries to this end.

2000-23: We also support the initiative of negotiating an effective comprehensive convention on terrorism.

War Criminals

2000-24: We support the work of existing international criminal tribunals, [and] fully cooperate with them

UN Reform

2000-25: We also confirm the need for the UN to operate on a sound financial basis, with efficient budgetary arrangements, as well as equitable financial contributions among the Member States.

UN Peacekeeping

2000-26: We reaffirm our support for UN peacekeeping which is playing a crucial and growing role in maintaining peace and stability in the world.

Democracy

2000-27: We reaffirm our commitment to democracy, and underline the positive interaction between democracy, respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms.

Environment

2000-28: Our governments will continue to work with all regions and stakeholders in preparation for Rio+10.

2000-29: We will continue to address the need for capacity building to assist developing countries implement commitments made in multilateral environmental agreements.

2000-30: We reaffirm our commitment to and practice of sustainable forest management, including combating illegal logging.

2000-31: We will also work in international organizations and fora such as UNEP, UNDP, UNESCO, and the World Bank in addressing international water resource issues.

2000-32: We stress the need for rapid and effective sharing of information to alleviate the effects of natural disasters.

Regional Issues

East Asia

2000-33: We reiterate our support for the implementation of the Agreed Framework, including KEDO.

2000-34: We reaffirm our support for the ROK's policy of engagement.

2000-35: [We welcome the democratic developments in Indonesia,] and reaffirm our commitment to continuing support for the country's democratic and economic reform efforts.

2000-36: Recalling the importance of Indonesia's territorial integrity, we are determined to provide full support for the efforts of Indonesia toward stabilization of the situation in Aceh, Maluku, Irian Jaya and other regions

2000-37: We commend the assistance provided by the UN and other actors toward the independence and nation building of East Timor, and reiterate our firm commitment to continue supporting the people of East Timor in these efforts

South Asia

2000-38: We are also concerned at the continuing conflict in Sri Lanka. We support efforts to facilitate a peaceful resolution of the conflict.

Middle East Peace Process

2000-39: [In the Middle East, there is a real opportunity for the achievement of a comprehensive peace based on the UN Security Council Resolutions 242 and 338 and the agreements of Madrid and Oslo.] We reaffirm our strong support for the efforts by the parties concerned to advance the peace process toward this end.

2000-40: [Being aware that attaining these goals will also depend on the government's ability to meet the infrastructure and development needs of this region,] we are committed to supporting its efforts to this end. (Lebanon)

Iraq

2000-41: We reaffirm our commitment to the territorial integrity of all the states of the region

Balkans

2000-42: We remain committed to the full implementation of the UNSCR 1244.

2000-43: We will make every effort to encourage and enable the national communities of Kosovo, particularly Serb and Roma, to participate freely in the elections.

2000-44: We reaffirm our support to the efforts made by UNMIK and KFOR to achieve the goals set out in UNSCR 1244

2000-45: We welcome the continued consolidation of democracy in Montenegro [and] reiterate our support for its democratically elected authorities

2000-46: We reiterate our commitment to the full implementation of the Dayton accords for peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina

2000-47: [We] will continue to encourage all parties concerned within the country, the citizens and the officials, to assume their responsibilities and to take ownership of their future.

Africa

2000-48: We welcome the cessation of hostilities agreement between Ethiopia and Eritrea signed in Algiers last month, and support its full implementation

2000-49: [we] reaffirm our full support for all efforts to promote a peace settlement in Ethiopia and Eritrea.

2000-50: We support African efforts to promote the rule of law, good governance and democracy.

2000-51: We also commit ourselves to support Africans' efforts to reduce poverty through growth with equity, and to participate as full partners in the global economy by means including trade and investment liberalization and promotion.

2000-52: We will participate in efforts to combat infectious and parasitic diseases, particularly HIV/AIDS, TB and malaria

2000-53: [We will participate in efforts to] address the severe economic and social impact of these diseases.

Colombia

2000-54: We fully support the Colombian Government's programs and initiatives to lay the foundations for a stable, lasting peace

2000-55: [We fully support the Colombian Government's programs and initiatives to lay the foundations for] the end of the cultivation of and trafficking in illicit crops in Colombia, taking into account the aspirations and needs of local communities.

2000-56: We reaffirm our commitment to combat money laundering, the illicit trade in arms and chemical precursors usable for illegal drug manufacturing, with a view to eliminating financing sources for the illegal armed groups in the country.

G8 Miyazaki Initiatives for Conflict Prevention

2000-57: The G8 welcomes wider use of the relevant provisions of the UN Charter for preventive diplomacy and will work for integration of the diverse elements of the UN system so as to support more effectively preventive action.

2000-58: We intend to contribute to strengthening the conflict prevention and early warning capacity of the UN by, inter alia, promoting the reinforcement of the role of the Special Representatives of the Secretary General.

Small Arms and Light Weapons

2000-59: The G8 therefore strongly supports national, regional, and international efforts to ensure that transfers of small arms are carried out in a responsible and legal fashion, and to reduce existing destabilizing accumulations to levels consistent with legitimate defense and security needs.

The G8:

2000-50: [looks forward to the holding and a successful outcome of the UN Conference on the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons in All Its Aspects, in 2001.] We will work for a conference with a broad agenda whose outcome will genuinely strengthen international efforts to eradicate illicit trafficking, particularly of small arms.

2000-51: while recognizing that transfers of small arms are consistent with the right of self-defense enshrined in the UN Charter, confirms that we will exercise a high degree of responsibility in controlling and licensing such exports.

2000-52: Unless we have stricter regulations, in our approach to approving export licenses the G8 will take as a minimum criterion the legitimate defense and security needs of the recipient.

2000-53: The G8 will not authorize the export of small arms if there is a clear risk that these might be used for repression or aggression against another country.

2000-54: Finally, the G8 will consider the scope for further action at the national level and in international fora such as the Wassenaar Arrangement to minimize the risk that small arms may be illegally diverted or re-exported.

2000-55: The G8 will take steps to ensure that our export licensing decisions respect the ECOWAS moratorium and urge other exporting states to do likewise.

2000-56: The G8 will work to build international consensus on increasing the degree of transparency attached to such transfers.

2000-57: With the aim of combating the illicit trafficking of small arms and building confidence, the G8 stands ready to exchange information in appropriate fora concerning national legislation, practices and experience

2000-58: The G8 is committed to maintaining effective national export control and enforcement systems in order to prevent the illicit transfer of small arms from, via or to our territories.

2000-59: We reaffirm our commitment to implement strictly all arms embargoes imposed by the UN Security Council.

2000-60: We strongly support efforts to increase the effectiveness of UN sanctions, such as the Security Council's decision to investigate reports on the violation of measures against UNITA.

2000-61: stands ready to support projects and programs which will increase the capacity of states directly affected by illicit small arms trafficking to implement effective controls.

2000-62: The G8 will play an active and constructive role in the work to elaborate the Protocol against the Illicit Manufacturing of and Trafficking in Firearms, Their Parts and Components and Ammunition, supplementing the draft UN Convention Against Transnational Organized Crime, which will serve as a key element in international efforts to combat illicit firearms trafficking, with a view to ensuring these negotiations are completed by the end of 2000.

2000-63: pledges its full support for the effort to reduce existing destabilizing accumulations of small arms.

2000-64: The G8 confirms that we are ready to support such efforts through the voluntary provision of financial and technical assistance, including through specifically targeted funds, existing or to be established, at the UN, regional and local level, and designed to deal with the problem of small arms, and call upon the international community to do likewise.

2000-65: The G8 will support the inclusion of such programs where appropriate in peace agreements between the parties to conflicts and mandates of peace keeping forces and other relevant missions.

Conflict and Development

Promoting the Consideration of Conflict Prevention in Development Assistance Strategies

The G8:

2000-66: will consult with the relevant international financial institutions regarding conflict-related implications of development assistance.

2000-67: aims, with other bilateral and multilateral actors, to use development assistance to promote democratic and legislative institutions, good governance, rule of law, peaceful resolution of disputes, civic education and other structural elements.

2000-68: aims to build capacity in administrative and security systems, including police, penal and judicial institutions.

2000-69: considers ways to use economic and development assistance to address causes of conflict stemming from competition for natural resources, such as water, and to encourage regional approaches to their management .

2000-70: will pay attention, in extending economic and development cooperation, to excessive military expenditure where it occurs in recipient countries

Focusing Assistance to Ensure Quick Action to Prevent Conflict
The G8:
2000-71: will work towards more effective and better coordinated provision of emergency and other relevant assistance through regional and international organizations, in particular the United Nations.
Ensuring a Smooth Transition from Emergency Humanitarian Assistance to Development in the Post-Conflict Stage
The G8
2000-72: will strive to focus emergency and transition aid on supporting local security, economic and political stability, local capacity building, and reconciliation.

Illicit Trade in Diamonds

The G8, which accounts for the bulk of the global market for diamonds:

2000-73: will co-operate closely with governments of diamond-producing states, neighboring states, major marketing centers, regional organizations and industry in order to curb illicit diamond flows.

2000-74: supports the efforts of African states in strengthening regional law enforcement and internal capacity building for curbing the illicit trade in diamonds

2000-75: [welcomes 'Technical Forum on Diamonds' held at Kimberly, South Africa, as an important contribution to finding pragmatic solutions.] The G8 supports rapid follow-up, involving all the key actors, which should include the exploring of a possible certification scheme for rough diamonds from conflict areas, industry codes of conduct and an international body to promote transparency and accountability.

2000-76: will consider appropriate action to keep diamonds from illicit transactions out of the G8 markets.

Children in Armed Conflict

Pressure Against Those Who Involve or Target Children in Armed Conflict in Breach of International Standards

The G8:

2000-77: will concert G8's pressure in UN and other fora against individual governments and armed groups when access to assistance is denied to children or when children are specifically targeted as victims and/or participants in a conflict.

2000-78: will take account of, and promote international standards on the non-use of child soldiers in considering our military assistance to armed forces in third countries.

Support for International Standards and Mechanisms

The G8:

2000-79: will cooperate in the UN and other international fora when there is a need to ensure assistance to children in armed conflicts or when children are specifically targeted as victims and/or participants in a conflict.

Outreach,

The G8:

2000-80: supports action by the UN, regional organizations, NGOs and media in raising awareness of problems of children in armed conflict.

2000-81: commits to include child rights training in military assistance training programs.

2000-82: supports the 2001 UN Special Session to review the achievement of the goals of the World Summit for Children and works to ensure that any document it adopts has a strong section addressing the issue of war-affected children.

2000-83: encourages and supports other national and regional efforts to highlight the issue of children in armed conflict, including the Conference on War Affected Children in West Africa (April 2000) and the international conference to be hosted by Canada in September 2000 on this subject.

Reintegration and Rehabilitation

The G8:

2000-84: commits to promote the protection, welfare and rights of children during peace negotiations and throughout the process of consolidating peace in the aftermath of conflict, including through reintegration of former child soldiers in peace support operations.

2000-85: commits to prioritize assistance for war-affected children, including former child soldiers, in expenditure for post-conflict reconstruction.

July 18-19, 2001 Italy

N=32

Conclusions

2001-1: [We had a broad and informal exchange of views on how to enhance the dialogue between G8 and civil societies, taking into account both risks and opportunities of the present process of interdependence and globalisation.] We will continue to work closely, together and with others, on this topical aspect.

2001-2: On Middle East, FYROM, Africa and the Korean Peninsula, we have agreed to submit our language directly to the G8 Heads of State and Government for their Summit in Genova on 20-22 July.

Global Challenges for Peace and Security

Conflict prevention

2001-3: While the main responsibility for avoiding conflict lies with those directly involved, we will continue to work for effective action by the international community, primarily the United Nations, to prevent conflict.

2001-4: We register, and we will continue to support, progress in the five areas we identified in Miyazaki, in particular for the item of conflict and development, in the framework of which aspects such as disarmament, demobilisation and reintegration and co-operation on water management will receive our special attention.

Disarmament, Non-Proliferation and Arms Control

2001-5: [In this context we welcome efforts to strengthen international arms control and non-proliferation regime] and reaffirm our determination to promote compliance with and the universality of the fundamental treaties related to weapons of mass destruction

2001-6: [In this context we welcome efforts to strengthen international arms control and non-proliferation regime and reaffirm our determination to] contribute to the implementation of the conclusions of the 2000 NPT Review Conference.

2001-7: We remain fully committed to pursue efforts to ensure that the BTWC is an effective instrument to counter the growing threat of biological weapons.

2001-8: We reaffirm our commitment to an immediate commencement of negotiations on a Fissile Material Cut-off Treaty with a view to their conclusion within five years.

2001-9: We will also support the efforts of the Russian Federation to destroy its chemical weapons in accordance with the Chemical Weapons Convention.

2001-10: As part of the international community's efforts to raise humanitarian standards concerning conventional weapons, including explosive remnants of war, we will work for a successful outcome to this year's Review Conference for the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons (CCWC).

2001-11: We are determined to support efforts, including those under the Ottawa Convention, as well as the amended Mines Protocol of the CCWC, in the areas of mine clearance

2001-12: [We are determined to support efforts, including those under the Ottawa Convention, as well as the amended Mines Protocol of the CCWC, in the areas of] humanitarian demining

2001-13: [We are determined to support efforts, including those under the Ottawa Convention, as well as the amended Mines Protocol of the CCWC, in the areas of] victim assistance

2001-14: [We are determined to support efforts, including those under the Ottawa Convention, as well as the amended Mines Protocol of the CCWC, in the] development of technologies for mine action.

2001-15: We commit ourselves to work actively towards achieving the goal of a practical programme at the UN Conference on the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons.

Terrorism

2001-16: we reaffirm our political support for the negotiation of a comprehensive UN Convention against international terrorism.

United Nations

2001-17: Restating the importance of the conclusions of last year's Millennium Summit and Assembly, we reaffirm our commitment to reform, strengthen and enhance the effectiveness of the UN system, including reform of the Security Council.

2001-18: On the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the 1951 Geneva Convention on refugees, the G8 reaffirms its commitment to its provisions as well as the 1967 Protocol, and pays tribute to HCR for its action in favour of refugees.

Regional Crises

Balkans / South-Eastern Europe

2001-19: We will continue to support reform and enhanced regional co-operation.

2001-20: We reaffirm our full support for the Stability Pact and will work closely together to make the Regional Conference in Bucharest on 25-26 October a success.

Cyprus

2001-21: We recall the Okinawa statement and renew our commitment to support the efforts of the UNSG to find a just and lasting settlement that protects the fundamental interests of all parties in an undivided Cyprus giving full consideration to relevant UNSCRs.

Afghanistan

2001-22: We affirm our commitment to effective assistance to relieve the disastrous humanitarian situation of the Afghan people and to effective co-operation of donor countries and implementing agencies in the framework of the Afghanistan Support Group (ASG).

2001-23: We support the efforts of the UN and others to advance a peace process through political negotiations between the Afghan parties or through mechanisms such as a Loya Jirga, aimed at the establishment of a broad-based, multi-ethnic and fully representative government.

East Timor

2001-24: Recognising the enormous challenges faced by East Timor we reaffirm our support for the efforts by people of East Timor to build a sustainable nation.

Africa

2001-25: Southern Africa, We support continuing efforts, both by the UN and by the Angolan government, to find a peaceful solution to the conflict there.

Progress on the Miyazaki Initiatives

2001-26: We will also need to give careful consideration to the financial consequences of improvements to the UN's peacekeeping mechanisms.

2001-27: We will continue to focus attention on co-operative and sustainable water management

2001-28: [We will continue to focus attention on] Disarmament, Demobilisation and Reintegration as ways to prevent conflict and we call for more work to be done on these items.

G8 Roma Initiatives on Conflict Prevention

On the basis of these premises, the G8:

2001-29: Supports the provision of appropriate gender-sensitive training for participants in peace-related operations, including military observers, civilian police, human rights and humanitarian personnel.

2001-30: Commits, where appropriate, to the integration of a gender perspective and to the participation of women in the development, design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of bilateral and multilateral assistance programmes.

Corporate Citizenship and Conflict Prevention

Based on these premises, the G8:

2001-31: expresses its intention to co-operate with private and non governmental sectors using these initiatives as points of reference.

2001-32: intends to work further with the private and non-governmental sectors to explore best practices to respond to specific challenges faced in high-risk environments.

June 12-13, 2002 Canada

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Chair's Statement

Counter-Terrorism

2002-1: G8 members are also committed to assisting individual states or regions to build their capacity to fight terrorism, working closely with the United Nations and relevant regional organizations, and focusing on areas where the G8 can make a value-added contribution. In offering this assistance, we will coordinate our efforts to avoid duplication and ensure the best application of our expertise.

India-Pakistan

2002-2: We are committed to continuing to work with India and Pakistan to deal with the fundamental problems underlying the current crisis and to sustaining coordinated diplomatic efforts in the region.

Non-Proliferation, Arms Control and Disarmament (NACD)

2002-3: In this regard, we reaffirmed the need to use all available instruments-from multilateral mechanisms and legally binding arrangements to export controls.

The Balkans

2002-4: We expressed our continued support for a strong international presence in the region.

G8 Initiative on Conflict and Development

Promoting Cooperative and Sustainable Management of Shared Water Resources

The G8

2002-5: values the utility of transboundary river commissions and will continue to support states in making full use of existing and creating new commissions;

2002-6: will use development assistance to promote integrated water resources management and good governance in the field of shared water resources development, management, protection and use within states and between states.

G8 Conflict Prevention: Disarmament, Demobilisation and Reintegration

Conclusions

2002-7: The G8 supports efforts to ensure strong commitments and concrete initiatives framed in a comprehensive approach when implementing the commitments entered into under the Programme of Action.

G8 Recommendations on Counter-Terrorism

Section 1: Rapid Implementation of Existing Counter-Terrorism Instruments

We commit ourselves and urge all other States to:

2002-8:            Take actions to ensure, as rapidly as possible, full adherence to the following instruments relating to the prevention and suppression of terrorism:

2002-9: the twelve United Nations conventions and protocols addressing counter-terrorism issues listed in the annex;

2002-10: all relevant United Nations Security Council Resolutions, in particular, United Nations Security Council Resolution 1373 (2001); and,

We commit ourselves and urge all other States to:

2002-11: Become a party, if entitled, to the Council of Europe's Convention on Cybercrime (2001), ensuring full and rapid implementation of its terms, or, ensure the availability of a legal framework approximating the measures called for in the Convention, as it provides useful measures to combat attacks by terrorists and other criminals on computer systems, as well as to gather electronic evidence of terrorism and other crimes.

Section 2: Support for Additional Multilateral Counter-Terrorism Initiatives and Instruments

We commit ourselves and urge all other States to:

2002-12: Work within the United Nations system to complete the draft UN Comprehensive Convention on International Terrorism, and coordinate our efforts in this regard.

2002-13: Promote appropriate action in multilateral organizations of which we are members, including at the regional level, in order to usefully supplement counter-terrorism measures already taken or under development at the global level.

Section 3: Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear Weapons

We commit ourselves and urge all other States to:

2002-14: With respect to ensuring effective action against the use of biological weapons by terrorists, make crimes the offences established in the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (1972), prosecute such crimes or, where appropriate, extradite individuals, in accordance with national law and bilateral extradition agreements

2002-15: [With respect to ensuring effective action against the use of biological weapons by terrorists] work cooperatively to develop best practices to deter and detect such offences.

2002-16: Take measures to work cooperatively to develop effective mechanisms to track and curb the illicit possession and transfer of selected biological agents both domestically and internationally

2002-17: [Take measures] to explore additional measures to prevent biological agents from being used to commit terrorist attacks.

2002-18: Work within the United Nations system to complete work on the draft International Convention for the Suppression of Acts of Nuclear Terrorism and strengthen our cooperative efforts to this end.

2002-19: Support ongoing negotiations to strengthen the 1980 Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and explore together potential additional international measures to advance its ends and investigate enhanced measures aimed at the problem of nuclear smuggling.

2002-20: Work cooperatively to develop, in appropriate international fora, best practices to ensure the protection of chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and related infrastructures against terrorist actions

2002-21: explore means to prevent sensitive information pertaining to these infrastructures from being used by terrorists for targeting purposes.

2002-22: Coordinate efforts and encourage support in other fora where concerted CBRN prevention programs are underway, such as at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

2002-23: Develop best practice guidelines for contingency planning at national levels

2002-24: strengthen existing arrangements for crisis response.

Section 4: Explosives and Firearms

We commit ourselves and urge all other States to:

2002-25: Accelerate research and development of methods of detection of explosives and weapons and other harmful substances that cause death or injury

2002-26: undertake consultations on the development of standards for marking explosives in order to identify their origin in post-blast investigations

2002-27: promote cooperation, where appropriate.

2002-28: Adopt effective domestic laws and regulations including export controls to govern manufacture, trading, transport, and export of firearms, explosives, or any device designed to cause violent injury, damage, or destruction, in order to prevent their use for terrorists' acts.

Section 5: Financing of Terrorism

We commit ourselves and urge all other States to:

2002-29: As rapidly as possible, ensure full implementation of the United Nations Security Council Resolution 1373

2002-30: [As rapidly as possible, ensure full implementation of the] International Convention for the Suppression of the Financing of Terrorism

2002-31: [As rapidly as possible, ensure full implementation of the] Financial Action Task Force's (FATF) Special Recommendations on Terrorist Financing (2001)

2002-32: participate in the fulfilment of the FATF global action plans.

2002-33: Adopt the steps to remove obstacles to effective common action to combat terrorist financing contained in the Report of the G8 Meeting on Legal Measures to Combat Terrorist Financing (2002), endorsed by G8 Justice and Interior Ministers (2002)

2002-34: move beyond freezing to also forfeit terrorist assets in order to permanently deprive terrorists of their funds.

2002-35: Implement the recommendations on "Money Laundering, Related Terrorist Financing and Asset Forfeiture" contained in the G8 Recommendations on Transnational Crime (2002).

2002-36: Facilitate, through appropriate domestic measures, the traceability of terrorist funds and ensure that mutual legal assistance is not refused on the grounds of bank secrecy or that the request involves a fiscal offence.

Section 6: Transportation Security

We commit ourselves and urge all other States to:

2002-37: Maintain strong financial support through voluntary contributions for the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation security activities to fulfil its standards and recommended practices with a view to deterring and detecting terrorism.

2002-38: Cooperate in conducting an expeditious review of aviation security conventions, international standards and recommended practices in the ICAO, with a view to updating such standards in order to deter and detect terrorism, including by applying mechanisms referred to the G8 Recommendations on Transnational Crime.

2002-39: Work as expeditiously as possible towards implementation of a common global standard for the collection and transmission of advance passenger information (API).

2002-40: Enhance their abilities to share timely information internationally with law enforcement and other appropriate counterparts, in accordance with applicable laws, with respect to passengers concerning whom there are specific and serious reasons to consider they may engage in a terrorist act.

2002-41: Work closely with each other and the International Maritime Organization (IMO) in order to improve the capability of governments to deter and prosecute terrorist attacks on maritime vessels or the use of such vessels to further terrorist activities.

2002-42: Cooperate in conducting an expeditious review of maritime safety conventions, international standards and recommended practices in the IMO, with a view to updating such standards in order to deter and detect terrorism.

2002-43: Work with relevant international organizations to develop and implement an improved global container security regime to identify and examine high-risk containers, their in-transit integrity

2002-44: implement the global common standards for electronic customs reporting

2002-45: work within the World Customs Organization (WCO) on advance information pertaining to containers as early as possible in the trade chain.

2002-46: Urgently intensify consultations among transport security and other relevant officials to improve the capability of governments to prevent, investigate, and respond to terrorist attacks on modes of mass ground transportation, such as railway, underground and bus transport systems, and to cooperate with other governments in this regard.

Section 7: Internal Coordination against Terrorism

We commit ourselves and urge all other States to:

2002-47: Strengthen internal cooperation between various national agencies and services which may deal with different aspects of counter-terrorism.

Section 8: International Cooperation

We commit ourselves and urge all other States to:

2002-48: Take all possible measures to deny safe havens to those who finance, plan, support, or commit terrorist acts, or provide safe havens.

2002-49: Ensure, in conformity with international law and, in particular, the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees and its 1967 Protocol, that refugee status is not abused by the perpetrators, organizers or facilitators of terrorist acts.

2002-50: Identify and eliminate obstacles to extradition to the greatest extent possible, including those referred to in "Part II: Enhancing International Cooperation" of the G8 Recommendations on Transnational Crime (2002).

2002-51: Take strong measures, including relevant legislative measures if necessary, in cooperation with other countries, to prevent terrorist acts and the international movement of terrorists by strengthening, inter alia, border, immigration, and travel document control and information sharing.

2002-52: Attach special priority to mutual legal assistance and law enforcement cooperation with respect to terrorism offences in order to ensure a quick and effective response, including those referred to in the recommendations on "Mutual Legal Assistance and Law Enforcement Channels" of the G8 Recommendations on Transnational Crime (2002).

2002-53: Develop effective measures for obtaining the rapid freezing, seizing and confiscation of assets related to terrorist activities.

2002-54: Ensure that claims of political motivation are not recognized as grounds for refusing requests for the extradition of alleged terrorists

2002-55: exclude or reduce to the greatest possible extent any application of the political offence exception in responding to a request for mutual legal assistance concerning terrorist offences.

Section 9: Links Between Terrorism and Transnational Crime

We commit ourselves and urge all other States to:

2002-56: Ensure that an effective framework is in place to fight against transnational crimes that can support or facilitate terrorist activity, such as that provided by the G8 Recommendations on Transnational Crime (2002).

2002-57: Examine and exchange information to determine the nature of links between terrorism and transnational crime, in particular, of the manner in which terrorist organizations can support their activities through the commission of other crimes

2002-58: develop strategies, as required, to enable concerted effort to disrupt and disable such activities.

2002-59: Support the efforts of the United Nations International Drug Control Programme (UNDCP) and its donors to coordinate counter-narcotics assistance in combating the drug trade in and emanating from Afghanistan, to strengthen the "security belts" around it and to maximize the effectiveness of UNDCP programmes in the region.

Section 10: Outreach to Non-G8 States

We commit ourselves and urge all other States to:

2002-60: Conduct outreach, including technical assistance, to other countries, in coordination with each other and with other parts of the G8 structure as well as regional organizations, with a view to building capacity to implement UNSCR 1373, the twelve United Nations counter-terrorism conventions and protocols listed in the annex, the Roma Group counter-terrorism recommendations, and the G8 Recommendations on Transnational Crime (2002), for the purpose of combating terrorism-related activities.

2002-61: As appropriate, develop best practices to facilitate such outreach

2002-62: cooperate closely on capacity building and outreach with the United Nations Security Council's Counter-Terrorism Committee (UNSC CTC).

2002-63: Develop additional measures, in cooperation with international organizations and civil society, to increase the awareness of all individuals that any act or threat of terrorism represents a serious crime with appropriate penalties.

G8 Foreign Ministers' Statement on Afghanistan

2002-64: We, the G8 Foreign Ministers, reaffirm the commitment of our governments to the establishment of a sovereign, stable and prosperous Afghanistan with democratic institutions and a government representative of all Afghan people, respecting their internationally enshrined human rights.

2002-65: We reaffirm our commitment to the political process set out in the Bonn Agreement of December 5, 2001

The G8 is committed to supporting the Afghan authorities in their work to:

2002-66: honourably demobilize former combatants and to reintegrate them into local communities

2002-68: to build national armed forces

2002-69: to create a national police force

2002-70: to restore the justice sector

2002-71: to eliminate the threat of landmines

2002-71: to help the Afghan authorities in their action-which we strongly endorse-against opium production and trafficking.

May 22-23, 2003, France

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Summary of the G8 Presidency

International security

Fight against terrorism

2003-1: We pledged to pursue our effort by further extending accession to the 12 UN conventions in this field and by supplementing measures relating to the financing of terrorism.

Non-proliferation

2003-2: They reaffirmed that the proliferation threat was to be met through a common and comprehensive approach relying on the international institutions, first and foremost among them the United Nations Security Council.

2003-4: Ministers pledged firmly to use and strengthen existing instruments, including the IAEA.

Afghanistan

2003-5: They reaffirmed their support to the Afghan Transitional Administration in its fight against poppy growing and opium production

May 22-23, 2004, United States

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Chairmen's Summary

2004-1: The Foreign Ministers and Representatives of 24 governments today committed themselves to continue their dialogue and collaboration at the first meeting of the Forum for the Future in Morocco later this year.

2004-2: the Ministers agreed to collaborate in their efforts and engage also in productive interactions with the business sector — where vitally important new jobs are created — and civil society, the open laboratory of ideas.

2004-3: Ministers confirmed their commitment to expand democratic institutions and practices and to undertake joint activities that will support reform efforts within the region.

2004-4: They reiterated their commitment to the full implementation of the Roadmap and to the goal of two states, Israel and a sovereign, independent, viable, democratic, and territorially contiguous Palestine, living side by side in peace and security, achieved through direct negotiations between the two sides.

2004-5: Participants also reaffirmed their commitment to market-based economic reforms

2004-6: [Participants also reaffirmed their] support for efforts to promote intra-regional trade and expand trade opportunities in global markets.

2004-7: Participants also agreed to encourage international development institutions to support the region's reform efforts.

2004-8: Accordingly, Ministers, with the participation of business and civil society, agreed to establish the Forum for the Future.

June 23, 2005, United Kingdom

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Chairman's Statement

The Middle East

2005-1: We affirmed G8 support for a negotiated solution to the Middle East conflict in accordance with the relevant United Nations Security Council Resolutions.

Iran

2005-2: Foreign Ministers underlined the G8's full support for the work of France, Germany and the UK, together with the EU High Representative, to negotiate long term arrangements for Iran's nuclear programme that provide objective guarantees that Iran's programme is for exclusively peaceful purposes.

2005-3: We reaffirmed our commitment to the work being undertaken to improve respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms in Iran.

UN Reform

2005-4: We underlined our collective commitment to work for a balanced Summit outcome, including agreement on measures to deliver much faster progress towards the Millennium Development Goals;

2005-5: [We underlined our collective commitment to work for a balanced Summit outcome, including] reform of the UN's human rights machinery;

2005-6: [We underlined our collective commitment to work for a balanced Summit outcome, including] the establishment of a Peacebuilding Commission to assist countries emerging from conflict in making the transition to lasting peace and sustainable development.

2005-7: We also agreed on the need for an enlarged and more representative Security Council that was able to address effectively the challenges of the 21st Century.

International Trade in Conventional Arms

2005-8: We agreed on the need for further work to build a consensus for action, taking full account of other relevant initiatives.

Sudan

2005-9: We will continue to support the humanitarian effort in Darfur and across Sudan.

Haiti

2005-10: We expressed support for the UN Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH) under its renewed and strengthened mandate and agreed that long-term international commitment is required.

Statement on Afghanistan

We are committed to supporting the Government and people of Afghanistan as they work to build on their achievements:

2005-11: to underpin their freedom and enhance their security

2005-12: to complete the transition to the rule of law

2005-13: to accelerate the pace and scope of human and economic development

2005-14: to eliminate dependence on the illicit drugs economy.

2005-15: We support the efforts to promote national reconciliation and to address injustices of the recent past

2005-16: We support the effort being made by the international community through the UN Security Council mandated and NATO-led International Security Assistance Force, and through Operation Enduring Freedom, to promote security and stability in Afghanistan.

We will work closely with the Government of Afghanistan and the United Nations:

2005-17: to help diminish the threat these groups pose to the political process, including to the forthcoming elections

2005-28: to security sector reform

2005-19: to our efforts to eliminate the production, processing and trade of narcotics.

2005-20: As G8 members, we will work to reinforce efforts to enhance the rule of law and human rights, with particular regard to judicial and police capacity and public administration, especially at provincial level.

2005-21: We will continue our support to Afghanistan's development effort, to achieve pro-poor growth through rebuilding infrastructure

2005-22: [We will continue our support to Afghanistan's development effort, to achieve pro-poor growth through] developing human and institutional capacity

2005-23: [We will continue our support to Afghanistan's development effort, to achieve pro-poor growth through] community based development.

June 29, 2006, Russia

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Chairman's Statement

Iran

2006-1: We reiterate our commitment to a diplomatic solution to the Iranian nuclear issue, which remains a source of international concern, as highlighted by the resolutions of the IAEA Board of Governors and the Presidential Statement of the UN Security Council.

The Middle East

2006-2: We reiterated our commitment for a negotiated, comprehensive, just and lasting settlement in the Middle East.

2006-3: Foreign Ministers reaffirmed their support for the restoration of the Israeli/Palestinian political dialogue in the spirit of the Roadmap and based on the UNSC Resolutions 242, 338, 1397 and 1515.

Korean Peninsula

2006-4: Foreign Ministers reiterated the G8 commitment to the denuclearisation of the Korean Peninsula, and expressed full support for the Six Party Talks.

Iraq

2006-5: Foreign Ministers reiterated the G8 commitment to Iraq's independence, sovereignty and territorial integrity.

Afghanistan

2006-6: [Foreign Ministers welcomed the successful holding of National Assembly and Provincial Council elections and formation of a new Government, and underlined] the G8 support for effective implementation of the commitments made by the international community and the Afghan Government within the framework of the London Conference on Afghanistan, including the Afghanistan Compact, and taking into account that more responsibility for providing security, political and socio-economic recovery falls on the Afghan Government.

2006-7: Afghanistan can be fully confident that the G8 will continue providing all-round support and assistance to its formation of peaceful, independent and prosperous state, without taliban heritage, terrorism and narcotics.

2006-8: Foreign Ministers reiterated the G8 commitment to helping Afghanistan with governance

2006-9: [Foreign Ministers reiterated the G8 commitment to helping Afghanistan with] human rights

2006-10: [Foreign Ministers reiterated the G8 commitment to helping Afghanistan with] the rule of law.

Sudan

2006-11: In view of the last decision adopted by the AU Peace and Security Council and the recent UNSC resolution 1679, we committed to do our utmost to implement these steps aimed at transforming the mandate of the AMIS to the UN-led peace-keeping operation in Darfur

Haiti

2006-12: We reiterated the G8 support for the UN Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH) including its renewed and strengthened mandate and reaffirmed that long-term international commitment is required.

May 30, 2007, Germany, Potsdam

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Chair's Statement

Iran

2007-1: We remain committed to a negotiated solution which would address the international concerns over Iran's nuclear programme

2007-2: Should Iran continue not to heed the call of the Security Council, we shall support further appropriate measures as agreed in in UNSCR 1747.

North Korea

2007-3: Foreign Ministers reiterated the G8 commitment to achieving the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula.

2007-4: We fully support the Six Party Talks and swift implementation of the initial actions agreed on 13 February 2007 as a first step towards full implementation of the Joint Statement of September 19, 2005 in good faith.

Middle East Peace Process

2007-5: Foreign Ministers reiterated the G8's commitment for a negotiated, comprehensive, just and lasting settlement in the Middle East.

2007-6: We reiterated our firm commitment to continue providing assistance to the Palestinian people and to strengthen Palestinian institutions.

Lebanon

2007-17 In this context, we remain committed to the establishment of a Special Tribunal for Lebanon.

Iraq

2007-8: Foreign Ministers reiterated the G8 commitment to Iraq's independence, sovereignty and territorial integrity.

2007-9: We fully support the democratically elected Government of Iraq and its efforts to restore public order, promote national reconciliation and the rule of law as well as economic reconstruction.

2007-10: We equally support its efforts to engage neighbouring states and the International Community.

2007-11: We are determined to build on the progress achieved at this forum in order to maintain its positive impact on the further development of the situation in Iraq

BMENA

2007-12: Foreign Ministers reiterated their commitment to the Broader Middle East and North Africa (BMENA) Initiative.

2007-13: Based on true partnership with governments and civil societies in the region in the spirit of respect for each country's diversity, the G8 offer their support to efforts geared at promoting good governance

2007-14: [Based on true partnership with governments and civil societies in the region in the spirit of respect for each country's diversity, the G8 offer their support to efforts geared at promoting] the rule of law

2007-15: [Based on true partnership with governments and civil societies in the region in the spirit of respect for each country's diversity, the G8 offer their support to efforts geared at promoting] human rights, including equal rights for women, social justice, strong civil societies, modern education systems and economic integration.

Afghanistan

2007-16: Afghanistan can be fully confident that the G8 will continue providing support and assistance to implement the security goals laid down in the Afghanistan Compact to achieve a modern country in line with the aspirations of the Afghan people.

2007-17: [Afghanistan can be fully confident that the G8 will continue providing support and assistance to implement the] governance [goals laid down in the Afghanistan Compact to achieve a modern country in line with the aspirations of the Afghan people.]

2007-18: [Afghanistan can be fully confident that the G8 will continue providing support and assistance to implement the] development [goals laid down in the Afghanistan Compact to achieve a modern country in line with the aspirations of the Afghan people.]

2007-19: We renew our support for the UN's central role and, in particular, for the work of the UN Secretary General's Special Representative and the UN Assistance Mission to Afghanistan, UNAMA, and its leadership role in the work of the Joint Coordination and Monitoring Board.

2007-20: We reiterate our commitment to helping Afghanistan to improve governance

2007-21: [We reiterate our commitment to helping Afghanistan to improve] human rights

2007-22: [We reiterate our commitment to helping Afghanistan to improve] the rule of law

Sudan

2007-23: We reiterate our commitment to continued humanitarian assistance.

2007-24: [We welcome the Southern African Development Community's initiative to address the Zimbabwe crisis its mandate to President Mbeki to facilitate laying the foundations for a free and fair election in 2008.] The G8 support SADC's efforts

Nigeria

2007-25: The G8 stands ready to continue to work with Nigeria in support of the reform process and in improving its capacity for democratic governance.

Coordination of Peacekeeping Training Efforts

2007-26: Foreign Ministers reaffirmed their commitment to regional peacekeeping capacity building and training, especially for Africa as an important component to our continued support for the UN peacekeeping efforts as well as of the African peace and security architecture.

Joint Statement by the Foreign Ministers of the G8 and the Foreign Ministers of Afghanistan and Pakistan on the "G8 Afghanistan-Pakistan Initiative"

2007-27: The Foreign Ministers of the G8, Afghanistan and Pakistan came together today to reiterate their strong commitment to security, stability and lasting peace in Afghanistan and the region.

2007-28: The Foreign Ministers of the G8, Afghanistan and Pakistan reinforced their commitment in the fight against all dimensions of terrorism

2007-29: They further committed to continue supporting moderation, fighting all forms of extremism and terrorism, including its financial, training and ideological centres through mutually agreed and coordinated action.

2007-30: The Foreign Ministers of Afghanistan and Pakistan renewed their Governments' commitment to strengthen cooperation and dialogue between their countries and governments at all levels, in particular in the field of security

2007-31: [The Foreign Ministers of Afghanistan and Pakistan renewed their Governments' commitment to strengthen cooperation and dialogue between their countries and governments at all levels, in particular in the field of] refugee issues

2007-32: [The Foreign Ministers of Afghanistan and Pakistan renewed their Governments' commitment to strengthen cooperation and dialogue between their countries and governments at all levels, in particular in the field of] economic development

2007-33: [The Foreign Ministers of Afghanistan and Pakistan renewed their Governments' commitment to strengthen cooperation and dialogue between their countries and governments at all levels, in particular in the field of] increased contacts between civil societies.

2007-34: The members of the G8 commit themselves to work closely with the Governments of Afghanistan and Pakistan in support of their endeavour through concrete projects and targeted assistance in various fields.

2007-35: They stressed the commitment of the G8 to helping with arrangements towards enhancing the sustainability of return

2007-36: [They] pledged to further assist and complement already ongoing efforts in particular by helping to improve conditions for returnees in Afghanistan and in refugee-impacted areas in Pakistan.

2007-37: They underlined that the G8 will build on and work with existing UN, regional and bilateral mechanisms to support Afghanistan and that as a follow-up to the initiative concrete projects will be identified and further pursued by the G8 in close consultation and in agreement with Afghanistan

2007-38: They underlined that the G8 will build on and work with existing UN, regional and bilateral mechanisms to support Pakistan and that as a follow-up to the initiative concrete projects will be identified and further pursued by the G8 in close consultation and in agreement with Pakistan.

June 26-27, 2008, Kyoto

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Chair's Statement

Middle East

2008-1: Foreign Ministers reiterated the G8's full support for the ongoing Israeli-Palestinian negotiations with a view to reaching an agreement by the end of 2008 on the establishment of a viable Palestinian state in the West Bank and Gaza and an end to the conflict.

2008-2: We remain committed to continuing to provide assistance to the Palestinians, including those in Gaza

2008-3: [We remain committed to] helping to strengthen the Palestinian institutions

Iran

2008-4: We remain committed to a diplomatic solution to the issue through the dual track approach

Iraq

2008-5: Foreign Ministers reiterated the G8's firm commitment to supporting independence, sovereignty and territorial integrity of Iraq

2008-6: [Foreign Ministers reiterated the G8's firm commitment to] Iraq's efforts for restoring security, promoting national reconciliation and human rights, and advancing economic reconstruction and foreign investment.

Pakistan

2008-7: We will strengthen our assistance to the democratically elected government to advance stability and economic development in Pakistan, including that to the Afghan-Pakistani border regions.

North Korea

2008-8: Foreign Ministers remain committed to achieving the verifiable denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula.

2008-9: We continue to support the Six-Party Talks

Myanmar

2008-10: Foreign Ministers remain committed to ensuring aid reaches those affected by Cyclone Nargis

Non-Proliferation and Disarmament Instruments

2008-11: We are determined to undertake all efforts to strengthen all relevant multilateral non-proliferation and disarmament instruments, in particular to achieve a successful outcome of the 2010 NPT Review Conference.

Peaceful Use of Nuclear Energy and 3S

2008-12: We agree on the need to strengthen our efforts to ensure 3S in nuclear energy infrastructure.

Counter-terrorism

2008-13: Foreign Ministers condemned in the strongest terms all acts of terrorism and reaffirmed the G8's commitment to counter terrorism

2008-14: We will strengthen capacity building for those countries requiring assistance to meet international counter-terrorism commitments in coordination with the UN and its relevant bodies.

Transnational Organized Crime

2008-15: Foreign Ministers reaffirmed the G8's commitment to combat transnational organized crime in its ever more diversified forms, including by the ratification and effective implementation of the related conventions and in cooperation with the relevant bodies such as the UNODC.

Peacekeeping/Peacebuilding

2008-16: Recognizing the importance of a comprehensive approach, we agree on the need to enhance the capacity for peacekeeping/peacebuilding worldwide in the areas of military, police and civilians.

Statement on Afghanistan

2008-17: We, the Foreign Ministers of the G8, renew our firm and long-term commitment to support Afghanistan through a holistic approach to its stability and reconstruction.

2008-18: [In this regard, we welcome UN Security Council Resolution 1806, which has strengthened UN Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) mandate,] and commit to supporting UNAMA and Special Representative of UN Secretary-General Kai Eide in their role as overall coordinator of efforts by the international community.

2008-19: We will accelerate our assistance to build the Afghan National Army and Police so that they may increasingly take the lead and become self-sufficient.

2008-20: We will also strengthen our support for Afghanistan in other elements of security sector reform, including Disbandment of the Illegal Armed Groups (DIAG) and justice reform throughout the country.

2008-21: We will step up our counter-narcotics efforts, including support for the elimination of illicit crops and sustainable economic alternatives.

2008-22: We welcome and support Afghanistan's commitment to strengthening its governance at both national and local levels in such a manner that will establish the rule of law

2008-23: [We welcome and support Afghanistan's commitment to strengthening its governance at both national and local levels in such a manner that will] respect and protect human rights

2008-24: [We welcome and support Afghanistan's commitment to strengthening its governance at both national and local levels in such a manner that will] prevent corruption.

2008-25: We will work closely with the UN and other relevant international organizations, private sector and non-governmental organizations in tackling development challenges so that all Afghans can enjoy the benefit of reconstruction and development.

2008-26: We underscore our commitment to support the Afghan Government as it prepares for presidential and parliamentary elections.

2008-27: We offer our continued assistance as Afghanistan works to establish an inclusive, representative and responsive political framework in compliance with the Afghan Constitution and UN Security Council Resolution 1267 with a goal of defeating extremism and terrorism and enabling democracy to take root in Afghanistan.

2008-28: In line with the G8 Afghanistan-Pakistan Initiative, we will strengthen our assistance to the border region, including the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA), and utilize the good offices of the Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for better coordination, as appropriate.

June 25-27, 2009, Italy

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Chair's Statement

Non Proliferation, Disarmament Instruments and Peaceful Use of Nuclear Energy

2009-1: We state our commitment to reinforce global non proliferation efforts by strengthening multilateral regimes.

2009-2: In that context we will strive for a successful outcome of the 2010 NPT Review Conference that strengthens the international nuclear non proliferation regime, promotes the international consensus underlying the Treaty and advances each of its three pillars.

2009-3: We are all committed to seeking a safer world for all and to creating the conditions for a world without nuclear weapons, in accordance with the goals of the NPT.

2009-4: We will intensify our efforts to bring into force the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty.

2009-5: We strongly support the early commencement of negotiations on a Treaty banning the production of fissile material for nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices that includes provisions for international verification.

2009-6: We will join in reinforcing IAEA safeguards and addressing serious violations of the NPT and IAEA safeguards.

2009-7: We reiterate our commitment to take appropriate steps for further implementation of the Global Initiative to Combat Nuclear Terrorism.

2009-8: We support the development of multilateral approaches to the nuclear fuel cycle and appreciate ongoing initiatives in this regard.

Counter-terrorism

2009-9: [We reiterate, in the strongest terms, our firm condemnation of this phenomenon in all its manifestations, particularly suicide bombing and kidnapping, and] our commitment to counter violent extremism.

2009-10: We reiterate our commitment to respecting and defending human rights obligations, which is fundamental to countering terrorism.

2009-11: We support the full implementation of the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) recommendations

2009-12: [We support the full implementation of the] United Nations sanctions regime.

2009-13: We commit ourselves to further strengthen our coordination in this field

Trans-national Organised Crime

2009-14: We commit ourselves to supporting capacity building and providing technical assistance for strengthening criminal justice systems in third countries.

Peace-keeping / Peace-building

2009-15: We will continue to pursue a comprehensive approach to peace support operations in crisis areas, in which security, stabilization, post-conflict reconstruction and rule of law go hand in hand.

2009-16: Recognizing the leading role of the United Nations in the field of peacekeeping, in particular the UN Peacebuilding Commission, we further commit to enhancing international coordination in order to ensure the best possible application of resources.

2009-17: We pledge to support capacity building programs worldwide, with special attention to the police and civilian components as an effective bridge on the road from crisis to stability.

2009-18: In that context we look in particular at Africa, where we shall continue to work with the African Union, in order to increase continental peacekeeping capacity and strengthen institutions, including through enhanced cooperation between Training Centres, in keeping with the principle of local ownership.

2009-19: [In that context we look in particular at Africa, where we shall continue to work with] sub-regional organizations, [in order to increase continental peacekeeping capacity and strengthen institutions, including through enhanced cooperation between Training Centres, in keeping with the principle of local ownership.]

2009-20: [In that context we look in particular at Africa, where we shall continue to work with] African States, [in order to increase continental peacekeeping capacity and strengthen institutions, including through enhanced cooperation between Training Centres, in keeping with the principle of local ownership.]

Piracy

2009-21: We are committed to enhancing coordination and information sharing among those actors as well as initiatives to reinforce their inclusiveness.

2009-22: In the framework of the CGPCS and in cooperation with IMO, we shall help personnel from concerned States to take maximum advantage of training opportunities provided by the International Maritime Safety, Security and Environment Academy (IMSSEA), already operating in Genoa under an agreement with IMO, and the Regional Training Centre to be created in Djibouti.

2009-23: We shall consider offering concerned States, on a bilateral basis, further opportunities for coast guard and law enforcement agencies formation and training.

2009-24: We agreed to follow-up, also through meetings in the region at Ambassadors and experts level, in order to ensure that the G8 members provide maximum support to the work of the CGPCS and the implementation of its guidelines.

Iran

2009-25: We remain committed to finding a diplomatic solution to the issue of Iran's nuclear program and support renewed efforts to that effect, such as the readiness of the U.S. to enter into direct talks and the invitation from China, France, Germany, Russia, the United Kingdom and the United States to Iran to restart negotiations, as well as the constructive involvement of other G8 partners in the process.

Afghanistan and Pakistan

2009-26: We remain firmly committed to supporting the democratically elected governments of Afghanistan and Pakistan as they confront grave security, humanitarian, counter narcotics, terrorism and economic challenges and will help them strengthening institutional capacity and increasing the effectiveness of government.

DPRK

2009-27: We remain committed to the goal of the verifiable denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula through the full implementation of the 19 September 2005 Joint Statement of the Six Party Talks.

Middle East

2009-28: We maintain our firm commitment to continue providing assistance to the Palestinian people and to strengthen the Palestinian democratic institutions.

2009-29: We remain committed to actively supporting the implementation of current and future peace agreements, and encourage others to do the same.

2009-30: We continue to support a secure and united Iraq and pledge our ongoing support for free and inclusive national elections in the year ahead.

Myanmar

2009-31: We reaffirm our full support to the UN Secretary General's good office mission and the initiatives aimed at fostering dialogue and democratic transition in Myanmar, demanding international community to do likewise.

Yemen

2009-32: We will consider concerted and coordinated assistance, building upon the existing Consultative Group process.

Africa

2009-33: We shall work in order to create the conditions for transforming present problems in Africa into new opportunities for cooperation and development.

2009-34: We shall devote a special attention to protection of human rights, particularly on the most vulnerable such as children and women.

Somalia

2009-35: We recognise the need for enhanced and sustained humanitarian assistance and development efforts in Somalia, which we are willing to support.

Zimbabwe

2009-36: We will work with the transition government as it builds the institutions necessary for free and fair elections in a timely manner.

West Africa

2009-37: We encourage and will continue to support states of the region in their common effort to build the capacity to effectively meeting these challenges, including by addressing their root causes.

Caucasus

2009-38: We expressed our commitment for achieving regional stabilization.

2009-39: We state our support to efforts carried out to that effect with the active involvement of the UN, the OSCE and the EU.

Statement of G8 Foreign Ministers and Foreign Ministers of Afghanistan and Pakistan

2009-40: We, the Foreign Ministers of Afghanistan, Pakistan and the G8, affirm our commitment to working together to address the challenges that affect Afghanistan and the region. [Insurgency and terrorist activities, narcotics, trafficking, corruption, human rights violation and limited economic opportunities need to be tackled with resolve wherever they appear.]

2009-41: Foreign Ministers reiterate their full support for UNAMA and the indispensable role it can and should play in Afghanistan

2009-42: Through ongoing meetings of the Coordination Arrangement of the "G8, Afghanistan, and Pakistan Initiative", G8 members will continue to support Afghan- and Pakistani-led development projects across Pakistan-Afghanistan border, building on the work of cooperative initiatives such as the Dubai Process.

2009-43: The G8 will review the implementation of the Coordination Arrangement in 2010 to ensure that it continues to meet border management need

2009-44: The G8 will continue to support the Afghanistan and Pakistan Governments' efforts by targeting assistance to spur socio-economic development and bolster human and institutional capacity.

2009-45: In Afghanistan, the G8 will continue to work with the Independent Election Commission to help ensure credible, inclusive and secure Afghan elections,

2009-46: [In Afghanistan, the G8 remain] committed to assisting the United Nations (UN) and the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) in providing the IEC with the necessary technical, logistical, financial and security support.

2009-47: The G8 reaffirms the need for effectiveness and coordination in the aid delivery

2009-48: [The G8] is committed to assisting the Government of Afghanistan as it continues to work to ensure basic services

2009-49: [The G8] will also remain committed to working with the Afghan Government in strengthening democratic institutions both at national and local level, and addressing the prevailing challenges in the country.

In the context of the Comprehensive strategy G8 members will work with the Government of Afghanistan to ensure that the ANSF has the capacity to continue to assume greater responsibility for the security of the Afghan people.

2009-50: G8 Ministers stand ready to work with both Governments to promote peace, stability and development in the region as a whole.

2009-51: The G8 remains committed to working with the Pakistani Government as it endeavours to strengthen functioning democratic institutions, and its civil society in the face of terrorism, extremism and militancy.

2009-52: The G8 commits to working closely with the UN and humanitarian agencies to help provide assistance to those affected.

2009-53: The G8 also supports Pakistan's relief, rehabilitation and reconstruction efforts in this regard.

Chair Statement on Afghanistan and Regional Dimension

2009-54: Participants manifested support for close cooperation among countries of the region with the purpose of joining forces in the enhancement of controls to stem drug trafficking and smuggling of illicit goods while facilitating licit trade. In this regard, intelligence sharing, coordination in drug enforcement and in action to counter drug trafficking networks will be critical.

2009-55: Participants agree to open consultations about future coordination on these issues.

March 29-30, 2010, Canada

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G8 Foreign Ministers Condemn Moscow Terrorist Attacks

2010-1: They vowed that they would continue to collaborate to thwart and constrain terrorists

2010-2: [They vowed] to work for a world that is safe for all, based on the principles of democracy, and respect for the rule of law and for human rights.

2010-3: The ministers reiterated their commitment to further enhance the central role of the United Nations and to adhere to its Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy and relevant United Nations Security Council resolutions.

G8 Foreign Ministers' Statement on Afghanistan

2010-4: We, the foreign ministers of the G8, reaffirm our collective commitment to support Afghanistan on its road to peace and stability.

2010-5: we are committed to assisting the Afghan Government in making progress.

2010-6: We, the G8, therefore reiterate our commitment to continue to foster the capability and effectiveness of the Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF), by providing the appropriate support to the Government of Afghanistan in the phased growth and expansion of the ANSF.

G8 Foreign Ministers Announce Afghanistan-Pakistan Border Region Prosperity Initiative

2010-7: We, the foreign ministers of the G8, reaffirm our collective commitment to support Afghanistan on its road to peace and stability.

2010-8: We, the G8, therefore reiterate our commitment to continue to foster the capability and effectiveness of the Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF), by providing the appropriate support to the Government of Afghanistan in the phased growth and expansion of the ANSF.

2010-9: We also recognize the importance of, and support, the UN's efforts on humanitarian and development issues

G8 Foreign Ministers' Statement on Nuclear Non-Proliferation, Disarmament and Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Energy: A Contribution to the 2010 NTP Review Conference

2010-10: We, the foreign ministers of the G8, affirm our unequivocal support for the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) as the cornerstone of the nuclear non-proliferation regime and the essential foundation for the pursuit of nuclear disarmament and the promotion of the peaceful uses of nuclear energy.

2010-11: We will continue to consult with NPT partners ahead of and during the Review Conference in order to find common ground.

2010-12: We are committed to seeking a safer world for all and to creating the conditions for a world without nuclear weapons, in accordance with the goals of the NPT.

2010-13: We reiterate our enduring commitment to the fulfilment of our shared obligations to pursue negotiations in good faith on effective measures relating to nuclear arms reduction and disarmament

2010-14: [We reiterate our enduring commitment to the fulfilment of our shared obligations to pursue negotiations in good faith on] a treaty on general and complete disarmament under strict and effective international control.

2010-15: We will redouble efforts on practical measures to accomplish that purpose, such as the pursuit of comprehensive reductions of nuclear arsenals.

2010-16: We pledge to continue our efforts for the permanent and legally binding cessation of all nuclear weapons-test explosions or any other nuclear explosion through the swift entry into force of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT)

2010-17: We will expand our support for the peaceful applications of nuclear energy, science and technology that can benefit all.

2010-18: We will cooperate with countries which intend to develop such programs, particularly in the areas of power generation, healthcare and food security and will help them to meet essential requirements regarding safety, security, non-proliferation and protection of the environment for future generations.

2010-19: We also strongly support the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) efforts to broaden access to the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, including the development of multilateral approaches to the nuclear fuel cycle such as assurances of fuel supply and fuel services.

2010-20: We will therefore work with all interested states to take practical steps towards implementing the Resolution in its entirety.

2010-21: In particular, we reaffirm our support for the creation of a zone free of nuclear and other weapons of mass destruction and their means of delivery in the Middle East

2010-22: We also reaffirm our commitment to relevant decisions adopted at the 1995 Conference and the Final Document adopted at the 2000 NPT Review Conference.

2010-23: We will work collectively to strengthen the institutional framework of the Treaty, which will contribute to its effective and efficient implementation.

2010-24: We will continue to report regularly on progress made under the Treaty and are encouraging all NPT States Party to do the same in order to allow for further confidence-building at the Review Conference.

2010-25: [We believe that political leadership at the Review Conference will be of critical importance to collectively reaffirm our shared resolve to achieve the goals of the NPT.] We commit to have our respective delegations led at a high level and urge other States Party to do the same.

Canadian Chair's Statement

Nuclear Non-proliferation and Disarmament

2010-26: In this respect, ministers stressed the need to implement, and to support developing countries in the implementation of UNSC Resolution 1540, which requires states to take concrete measures against the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction.

Iran

2010-27: In the context of the dual track approach, ministers agreed to remain open to dialogue

2010-28: [In the context of the dual track approach, ministers] also reaffirmed the need to take appropriate and strong steps to demonstrate international resolve to uphold the international nuclear non-proliferation regime and persuade Iran to build greater international confidence in the peaceful nature of its nuclear program.

Terrorism

2010-29: They agreed to work out a robust action plan envisaging, inter alia the reinforcement and relevance of the activities of the Roma/Lyon group and Counter-Terrorism Action Group in order to enhance their contribution to the global effort to combat terrorism. This plan will be submitted to the leaders at the Muskoka Summit.

2010-30: Ministers agreed to continue to support both the Afghan and Pakistani governments in their efforts in the border region.

2010-31: [They also agreed that military-only responses are not sufficient, and that solutions must include support for development, sound governance and economic reform.] In this respect, ministers agreed to undertake, in partnership with the Afghan and Pakistani governments, and the World Bank and the Asian Development Bank, an Afghanistan Pakistan Border Region Prosperity Initiative aimed at building trade and border infrastructure to foster economic development and local employment.

Security Vulnerabilities

2010-32: [Ministers also spoke about the challenges faced by some countries in Latin America and the Caribbean from transnational organized crime and illicit trafficking in drugs, and the increasingly widespread implications not only for the Americas, but also for Africa (through which the drugs transit) and Europe.] They reaffirmed their commitment to combat these security vulnerabilities through bilateral and multilateral cooperation, in particular with regional organizations, including the Organization of American States.

2010-33: They also reaffirmed their commitment to provide continued support to help the Palestinians build democratic institutions.

2011 France

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Chair's Summary

2011-1: G8 countries will continue to monitor the situation closely and remain ready to act in support of Japan, including through the IAEA.

Libya

2011-2: [They stressed the importance of regional participation in any such efforts,] and agreed to follow up urgently with the League of Arab States.

Broader Middle East and North Africa

2011-3: G8 countries will mobilise regional and international organisations to support urgent social, economic and fiscal measures to create employment, stabilise public finances and further open export markets. [Libya and Tunisa]

2011-4: [Ministers confirm the value of the ongoing G8-BMENA Partnership for Progress and a Common Future,] and reiterate their commitment to the G8-BMENA process as a mechanism for consultation and cooperation between governments, civil society organisations, and business to support political, economic and social reforms that respond to the aspirations of the region's citizens.

2011-5: They reaffirmed their commitment to the Special Tribunal for Lebanon (STL) as an independent court, created by UNSC Resolution 1757. [The STL must continue its work without impediment and with the cooperation of the Lebanese Government. They encouraged additional voluntary contributions for its funding.]

Further G8 action

2011-6: With a view to mutually-beneficial and harmonious co-development, G8 countries will work, individually and jointly in relevant forums, for the swift resumption of trade with the region

2011-7: With a view to mutually-beneficial and harmonious co-development, G8 countries will work, individually and jointly in relevant forums, for the swift resumption of human and economic exchanges with the region.

2011-8: Ministers decided to increase their dialogue with civil societies throughout the region, with a view to fostering the further emergence of free media. They agreed to use the 2011 BMENA meeting in Kuwait to that end.

2011-9: [Ministers decided to increase their dialogue with civil societies throughout the region, with a view to fostering the further emergence of] the empowerment of non-governmental organisations. They agreed to use the 2011 BMENA meeting in Kuwait to that end.

2011-10: [Ministers decided to increase their dialogue with civil societies throughout the region, with a view to fostering the further emergence of] the development of vocational training and socially responsible businesses. They agreed to use the 2011 BMENA meeting in Kuwait to that end.

2011-11: They will further explore the issue with the international institutions and the regional development banks. [re: Egypt and Tunisia]

Middle East Peace Process

2011-12: In line with previous Quartet statements, they remain committed to the conclusion of a negotiated framework agreement on all final status issues by September 2011.

2011-13: They remain committed to holding a conference in 2012 on a zone free of weapons of mass destruction in the Middle East, as endorsed by the 2010 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference, with a view to creating a peaceful environment in the region.

Africa

2011-14: Ministers committed to renewing this partnership and their ongoing support for the African Union's peace and security architecture, including through peace-keeping capability-building efforts.

2011-15: [They commended the action undertaken by the AU and its mission, AMISOM,] and expressed their full support for the action of the UNSG's Special Representative for Somalia.

2011-16: Ministers indicated their determination toassist efforts to strengthen peace and security in the whole of the Great Lakes region

Afghanistan

2011-17: Ministers reaffirmed their commitment to a stable, peaceful and sovereign Afghanistan, free of outside interference, terrorism, extremist violence, and illicit drug production and trafficking, with full ownership of its own security, governance and development.

2011-18: In support of this goal and in close coordination with the sustained efforts of the United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA), G8 countries will continue to support the transition process endorsed by Afghanistan and the international community at the London and Kabul Conferences as well as at the NATO Lisbon Summit.

2011-19: [G8 countries welcomed the inauguration of the new Afghan Parliament] and will continue to support efforts to strengthen Afghan democracy.

Haiti

2011-20: Ministers reiterated their support to Haitian efforts towards full recovery.

•••

2011-21: They restated their resolve to spare no efforts in fighting proliferation

2011-22: [They restated their resolve to spare no efforts to] take all appropriate national measures to follow up the decisions of the 2010 NPT Review Conference

2011-23: [They restated their resolve to spare no efforts to] promote the early entry into force and universalisation of the CTBT

[They restated their resolve to spare no efforts to] early commencement of substantive negotiations within the Conference on Disarmament with an agreed, comprehensive and balanced programme of work on an FMCT

2011-24: [They restated their resolve to spare no efforts to] further development of multilateral approaches to the nuclear fuel cycle as part of IAEA efforts to broaden access to the peaceful use of nuclear energy.

2011-25: The Group of 8 and its members stand ready to deepen their cooperation with African countries and relevant regional organisations in addressing the common challenge of terrorism.

Statement of the G8 Foreign Ministers on the 7th Review Conference for the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention

2011-26: We intend to pursue our consultations with all BTWC States Parties to establish a consensus on the major issues of the Review Conference and on the necessary actions to address these issues.

2011-27: We will support the efforts of the appointed President of this Review Conference, Ambassador van den IJssel, to succeed in adopting a balanced and substantive final declaration, which will pave the way for tangible progress with respect to implementation of and compliance with the provisions of the Convention

2011-28: Guided by the objective of a more secure and safer world, and convinced that the use of such weapons is unacceptable to the conscience of humanity and would pose a grave threat to international security, we reaffirm our commitment to fully respect all obligations under the BTWC and in particular to never, under any circumstances, develop, produce, stockpile or otherwise acquire, retain or use this type of weapon.

2011-29: [We call upon all States Parties to the Convention to join us in the effort to effectively preclude the acquisition and use of biological weapons by both State and non-state actors] and we will continue assistance and cooperation actions through all appropriate channels.

2011-30: Aware of the importance of the intersessional work of the Convention to achieve this objective, we are determined to engage in discussions with all States Parties on a new and substantive work programme addressing the central issues of the Convention, including looking at more effective ways to enhance assurance of compliance with the BTWC as well as the implications of relevant scientific and technological developments for all appropriate articles of the Convention.

2011-31: We are likewise determined to work with States Parties and others to devise ways to strengthen the Convention and its regime, with a view to considering and taking relevant decisions at the 7th Review Conference.

2011-32: We will also support the strengthening of the current UNSG mechanism for investigating cases of alleged use of chemical and biological weapons in accordance with General Assembly Resolution 42/37.

2011-33: We pledge our full support to renewing the ISU's mandate and, if necessary, to consolidating it, following an assessment of its tasks and resources by the Review conference.

2011-34: We are determined to pursue with all States Parties work to improve transparency

2011-35: [We are determined] to step up efforts to increase participation in the confidence building measures.

2011-36: Like the European Union, whose efforts we commend, we will continue to assist States that wish to benefit from technical assistance in submitting their confidence-building measures.

2011-37: [The involvement of civil society, particularly the academic and industrial sectors, is essential to the effective implementation of the provisions of the Convention.] We will therefore step up such engagement to fully take account of scientific and technical developments in the biological area.

2011-38: We will likewise work on better awareness raising among those involved in the development of life sciences in order to limit the possibilities of misuse of technical developments, including supporting dual-use education programs on bioethics.

2011-39: The universality of the Convention is indispensable. We will make every effort to achieve this objective and urge all States that have not already done so, to accede to the Convention.

2012 United States

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Chair's Statement

Political Transitions in the Middle East and North Africa

2012-1: The G8 will continue to work through the Deauville Partnership to support democratization and economic growth in the region by promoting economic stabilization, public participation in government, and integrated trade.

Syria

2012-2: [The G8 Ministers remain gravely concerned by the appalling loss of life and humanitarian crisis in Syria since their previous meeting. Against that background, the Ministers welcome the report of Joint Special Envoy Kofi Annan that a fragile cessation of violence has taken effect in Syria despite isolated incidents.] The Ministers support the steps outlined by the Special Envoy

2012-3: The Ministers reiterate their support for all elements of the Quartet's September 23, 2011 statement and confirm their commitment to a just, lasting, and comprehensive peace in the Middle East.

Iraq

2012-4: The Ministers affirm their commitment to support Iraq in strengthening its democratic processes

2012-5: [The Ministers affirm their commitment to support Iraq in] developing its economy

2012-6: [The Ministers affirm their commitment to support Iraq in] building mutually beneficial diplomatic, economic, and security ties throughout the region.

2012-7: The G8 will seek out opportunities to broaden the scope of their engagement with Iraq across all sectors – diplomatic, security, trade, education, culture, law enforcement, environment, and energy cooperation.

Iran

2012-8: The Ministers expressed their support for efforts to work toward a comprehensive, negotiated, long-term solution which restores international confidence in the exclusively peaceful nature of Iran's nuclear program, while respecting Iran's right to the peaceful use of nuclear energy consistent with the NPT.

Burma/Myanmar

2012-9: The Ministers will consider the easing of sanctions to help this country embed reform and fully integrate into international and regional political and economic processes.

Africa

2012-10: The G8 supports efforts by the international community to work with the Electoral Commission to prepare recommendations for broad electoral reform. [DRC]

Afghanistan

2012-11: The Ministers underlined their strong commitment to the sovereignty, independence, territorial integrity, and national unity of Afghanistan.

Counter-Terrorism

2012-12: They reaffirmed their strong commitment to help victims of terrorist acts, who can be powerful voices against terrorism.

Transnational Organized Crime

2012-13: The Ministers affirmed support for collective efforts to mobilize international resources to identify, prevent, disrupt, and dismantle TOC

2012-14: [The Ministers affirmed support for collective efforts to mobilize international resources to identify, prevent, disrupt, and] dismantle the links, illicit pathways, or connections which exist in some cases between criminal networks and terrorist organizations.

2012-15: [The Ministers further recognized that the UN Convention against Transnational Organized Crime (UNTOC) commits states to collective action and international cooperation against organized crime] and reiterated their commitment to redouble efforts to assist countries to ratify and implement the UNTOC.

Maritime Security

2012-16: The Ministers remain committed to freedom of navigation, unimpeded lawful commerce, and the peaceful resolution of disputes based upon international law.

2012-17: The Ministers expressed their commitment to pursue international cooperation aimed at setting appropriate and globally shared standards of action to combat the threat, which are consistent with international law and the respect of the internationally recognized principles on jurisdiction in international waters.

2012-18: The G8 will continue its efforts to provide appropriate support to regional States and organizations in enhancing their capabilities to counter piracy and armed robbery at sea in the Gulf of Guinea.

Climate Change and Security

2012-19: [The G8 member states underscore their interest in promoting global growth, prosperity, peace and stability; recognize climate change as a contributing factor to increased security risks globally;] and intend to continue to work domestically and multilaterally to address climate change.

2012-20: The G8 fully support the decision of the Parties to the UNFCCC to launch a process to develop a new climate change agreement applicable to all Parties

Annex to the G8 Foreign Ministers Meeting Chair's Statement

Nuclear Safety and Security

2012-21: In this context, the G8 supports the effective, timely, and transparent implementation of the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) Action Plan on Nuclear Safety.

2012-22: The G8 reaffirms its support for the completion of the Chernobyl nuclear safety projects in Ukraine in a timely and cost-effective manner.

2012-23: The G8 supports, and through the 24-member Global Partnership, helps implement the 2012 Seoul and 2010 Washington Nuclear Security Summits' goal of securing vulnerable nuclear materials and radioactive sources around the world as well as the information, technology or expertise required to acquire or use nuclear materials for malicious purposes.

Disarmament and Nonproliferation

2012-24: The G8 reaffirms its unconditional support for the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) and for its universalization.

2012-25: We stress that all NPT Parties have an important stake in the health and vitality of the NPT and we support implementation of the action plan agreed at the 2010 NPT Review Conference to preserve and strengthen the international non-proliferation and disarmament regime.

2012-26: The G8 reiterates its commitment to the full implementation of UNSCR 1540 by all states and its support to the work of the UNSC 1540 Committee.

2012-27: The G8 supports the early entry into force of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT)

Space Security and Sustainability

2012-28: The G8 supports the work of the UN Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (COPUOS) towards ensuring the long-term sustainability of outer space activities.

2012-29: We also support the implementation of space-related transparency and confidence-building measures for responsible behavior in space, and related activity of the UN Group of Governmental Experts on Transparency and Confidence Building Measures (TCBM) in Outer Space Activities.

2012-30: We reiterate our commitment to carry on activities in the exploration and use of outer space in accordance with applicable international law, including the Charter of the United Nations.

Continuing Support for Global Health

2012-31: The G8 renews and recommits to supporting the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria on the tenth anniversary of its establishment and as the Fund adopts a comprehensive reform agenda.

2012-32: The G8 reaffirms its commitment to implementing the Muskoka Initiative and to global efforts to improve maternal, newborn, and child health in developing countries by delivering comprehensive interventions, including at the community level, across the continuum of care.

2012-33: We will also support major international efforts to reduce early childhood deaths

2012-34: [We will also support major international efforts to] generate the leadership and resources needed to increase access to family planning to enable women to choose whether, when, and how many children they have.

2012-35: The G8 likewise reaffirms its support to the Global Polio Eradication Initiative

2012-36: The G8 also reaffirms its resolve to accelerate reductions in preventable childhood deaths by increasing equitable access to routine immunization and life saving vaccines through the GAVI Alliance.

2012-37: [We are well aware that our global support has to rely on countries' health systems to become effective –] we therefore reiterate our intentions to provide support in line with internationally agreed aid effectiveness principles, including shared and mutual responsibility, aligned to national efforts of health systems strengthening.

2013 London, UK

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G8 Foreign Ministers' meeting statement

North and West Africa

2013-1: They reaffirmed their commitment to promoting tolerance and respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms.

Mali

2013-2: G8 Foreign Ministers restated their support for the territorial integrity of Mali and their condemnation of the violence by separatist and terrorist groups.

2013-3: The Ministers agreed to support a successful handover of stabilisation activity to AFISMA which has now successfully deployed to Mali and, as soon as conditions permit, to a multi-dimensional UN Operation.

Sudan and South Sudan

2013-4: Ministers commended and offered their continued support to the role of the African Union, in particular the work of the High-Level Implementation Panel.

Syria

2013-5: Against this desperate background, the Ministers reaffirmed their commitment to supporting a Syrian-led political transition, and the work of Joint UN and Arab League Special Representative Brahimi, based on the principles set out in the Geneva Communiqué.

Middle East Peace Process (MEPP)

2013-6: G8 Foreign Ministers confirmed their commitment to a just, lasting, and comprehensive peace in the Middle East.

2013-7: They agreed on the urgent need to make progress on the Middle East Peace Process towards this goal and underscored the need for a major international effort, involving all relevant parties, including the Quartet, to drive the peace process forward.

Deauville Partnership with Arab Countries in Transition

2013-8: G8 Foreign Ministers reaffirmed their commitment to the six Deauville Partnership transition countries (Egypt, Tunisia, Morocco, Jordan, Libya and Yemen) recognising progress made since the start of the Arab Spring

2013-9: The G8 will also promote a new focus on encouraging women's participation in business and the economy.

2013-10: As stated in the last Ministerial meeting on the Deauville Partnership with Arab Countries in Transition (New York, 28th September), G8 members will build on the G8's accountability efforts and report on progress achieved in the Partnership.

Yemen

2013-11: G8 Foreign Ministers re-affirmed their strong support for the political transition process in Yemen, including the start of the National Dialogue Conference, as outlined in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) Initiative and the UN Implementation Plan.

Non Proliferation and Disarmament

2013-11: G8 countries are all committed to seeking a safer world for all and to creating the conditions for a world without nuclear weapons, in a way that promotes international security, peace and undiminished security for all in accordance with the goals of the Nuclear Non Proliferation Treaty.

2013-12: G8 Foreign Ministers continue their commitment to efforts that strengthen and enhance long-term sustainability, stability, safety, and security in outer space.

2013-13: They strongly supported the continued efforts of the facilitator of the Conference

Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK)

2013-14: Ministers supported the commitment in the resolution to strengthen the current sanctions regime and take further significant measures in the event of a further launch or nuclear test by the DPRK.

2013-15: Ministers confirmed their commitment to the goal of lasting peace and the verifiable denuclearisation of the Korean Peninsula in a peaceful manner.

Burma/Myanmar

2013-16: Ministers underlined their firm intention to continue to support ongoing political and economic reforms

2013-17: [Ministers underlined their firm intention to continue to] help the authorities tackle the important challenges that remain

2013-18: [Ministers underlined their firm intention to continue to] work closely with other donors to ensure our assistance is used effectively to address the needs of the people of Burma/Myanmar in line with the Naypyitaw Accord for Effective Development Cooperation.

Afghanistan

2013-19: G8 Foreign Ministers reaffirmed their collective commitment to support Afghanistan on the path to peace and stability as it enters the 'transformation decade'.

2013-20: They agreed that all must meet their commitments under the Tokyo Mutual Accountability Framework.

Transnational challenges and opportunities

Cyber

2013-21: They further affirmed the need to take steps to promote transparency and confidence building measures in order to reduce the risk of misperceptions between states.

2013-22: Ministers agreed to promote and advance international cyber security capacity building initiatives to encourage a wide range of partners, including industry, to deliver increased and more effective capacity building across the globe.

2013-23: [Ministers agreed that cyber security capacity-building in this area needs to be embedded in the wider context of the economic growth and social benefits derived from the global digital economy.] They also agreed to ensure that these efforts are implemented in a way which promotes openness, trust and security, stability and the rule of law in the digital realm.

Climate Change

2013-24: The G8 agreed to consider means to better respond to this challenge and its associated risks, recalling that international climate policy and sustainable economic development are mutually reinforcing.

2013-25: Officials from interested G8 countries will meet to consider the potential consequences of climate change and associated environmental and resource stresses as a contributing factor to increased security risks globally, and report to Foreign Ministers.

2013-26: Ministers remain committed to long term efforts with a view to limiting effectively the increase in global average temperature below 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels, consistent with science.

The G8 remain fully committed:

2013-27: to the UNFCCC process

2013-28: to achieving, by 2015, a new climate change agreement, applicable to all Parties, which will come into effect and be implemented from 2020

2013-29: to increase mitigation ambition in the pre-2020 timeframe, including through international cooperative initiatives such as the Climate and Clean Air Coalition

2013-30: to the developed countries' goal of mobilising jointly USD 100bn per year by 2020, from a wide variety of public and private sources, in the context of meaningful mitigation actions and transparency on implementation.

Maritime Security

2013-31: Ministers remain committed to the freedom of navigation, unimpeded lawful commerce, and the peaceful resolution of disputes in accordance with applicable international law including UNCLOS.

2013-32: Ministers, firmly condemning acts of piracy and other maritime crime, expressed their continued commitment to pursue international cooperation to combat these threats remaining consistent with international law and internationally recognised principles of jurisdiction in international waters.

2013-33: Ministers reiterated the need to accelerate efforts to eliminate discrimination against women and girls in order to ensure their equal enjoyment of all human rights and fundamental freedoms.

Illicit Drugs

2013-34: They reiterated their commitment to the balanced and evidence based approach set out in the three United Nations conventions on the control of drugs (1961, 1971 and 1988).

Declaration on Preventing Sexual Violence in Conflict

2013-35: Ministers expressed their full support for the work of the UN in addressing sexual violence in armed conflict, particularly that of UN Women, and for the mandates of the UN Secretary-General's Special Representatives on Children and Armed Conflict and Sexual Violence in Conflict.

Ministers undertook to work together and with others in a concerted and comprehensive campaign:

2013-36: to raise awareness of these crimes

2013-37: to strengthen international political will at the very highest levels to remove the barriers that prevent the effective monitoring and reporting on situations of sexual violence in armed conflict

2013-38: to provide better support to victims

2013-39: to build both national and international capacities to respond to sexual violence in armed conflict including through investigating the crimes and prosecuting the offenders

2013-40: Ministers committed to support conflict-affected countries develop and implement country-level action plans with the involvement of local organisations to provide such protection.

2013-41: Ministers also agreed to enhance the coordination of their protection efforts in countries of concern, drawing, as appropriate, on existing guidelines such as those developed by the EU, for the protection and support of human rights defenders where applicable.

2013-42: Ministers also agreed to contribute to building the evidence base on the effective ways to prevent and respond to sexual violence in armed conflict and humanitarian emergencies.

2013-43: Ministers also agreed to support UN reform efforts aimed at ensuring that UN agencies and their partners meet agreed standards on gender-based violence in humanitarian settings.

2013-44: Ministers undertook to promote women's involvement in all peace negotiations, peacebuilding, prevention, and accountability efforts

2013-45: [Ministers undertook to] ensure that such efforts also take the needs and rights of women and children into consideration.

2013-46: In this regard, Ministers committed to assisting conflict-affected countries in ensuring that their future national security sector and justice reform programmes are gender and child-sensitive and that they are designed to address and reduce gender-based violence, including sexual violence, and promote the full participation of women.

2013-47: They committed to supporting the deployment of international experts in situations of particular concern with respect to sexual violence in conflict at the request of host governments, the UN and international organisations to build national judicial, criminal investigative and legal capacity to increase the number of perpetrators brought to justice.

2013-48: [Ministers recognised the important contribution of National Action Plans to the implementation of UN Security Council Resolution 1325,] undertook to regularly review such Plans and committed to providing support to conflict-affected countries in the development of their Plans.

2013-49: Ministers agreed that Governments should review the doctrine and training provided to their national military and police where appropriate to ensure that it includes training for appropriate personnel deployed to relevant theatres on the implications of rape and other forms of sexual violence in conflict and post-conflict situations.

2013-50: Ministers also support UN and other multilateral efforts to ensure such training is provided to international peacekeeping forces.

2013-51: Ministers reaffirmed their support for the mandate of the UN Secretary-General's Special Representative on Sexual Violence in Conflict, including their advocacy efforts with governments and other parties to armed conflict to make and implement specific and time-bound commitments to combat sexual violence, and the development and distribution of relevant tools and resources, including by other competent authorities.

2013-52: Ministers also affirmed their support for the work of the Team of Experts-Rule of Law / Sexual Violence in Conflict as mandated by UN Security Council Resolution 1888.

2014 United States

N=15

Statement on Ukraine

2014-1: We commit ourselves to help Ukraine to recover from this massive economic setback and to rebuild its economy.

2014-2: To this end we will closely work together and coordinate with other donors and international financial institutions.

Statement on Ebola

2014-3: we express our firm determination to support all necessary efforts to stop the Ebola virus from spreading further and prevent this humanitarian disaster from worsening.

2014-4: We agree to provide the best possible care for international health care workers in the event they contract the virus.

2014-5: To this end, G7 countries will coordinate capabilities and resources to help to ensure appropriate treatment locally as well as for airborne medical evacuation and hospitalization of infected international health care workers taking due account of the EU initiative in this field.

2014-6: Even while we are responding to the immediate Ebola epidemic, we must also act to establish capacity around the world to prevent, detect and rapidly respond to disease threats like Ebola. In order to do so, we support the implementation of the International Health Regulations and the Global Health Security Agenda.

G7 Foreign Ministers' Statement, Joint Action to Fight the Terrorist Organisation ISIL/DAESH

2014-7: We reaffirm our commitment to UN Security Council Resolution 2170 (2014)

2014-8: We support this comprehensive and coordinated, long-term effort to degrade and defeat ISIL.

2014-9: We also need to support moderate forces opposed to ISIL in both Iraq and Syria.

2014-10: To enhance these efforts we will seek to establish a political dialogue on security and stability within the region and platforms to enable a more structured exchange with countries willing to make constructive contributions against terrorism.

2014-11: We support the efforts of the UN Secretary-General's Special Representative for Iraq, Nikolay Mladenov, to advance an inclusive political dialogue, national reconciliation, and a regional dialogue.

2014-12: We are committed to restoring stability and peaceful co-existence of all ethnic and religious groups in Syria and Iraq.

2014-13: We remain committed to providing assistance to the victims of ISIL terror

2014-14: [We remain committed to] continue our humanitarian aid in close coordination with the UN and other international organisations.

2014-15: We will make every effort to strengthen the humanitarian response over the winter season

2015 United States

N=164

Communiqué

2015-1: Guided by our shared values and principles, including democracy, the rule of law and respect for human rights, we are determined to employ coordinated efforts and action to uphold freedom, peace and territorial integrity

2015-2: [Guided by our shared values and principles, including democracy, the rule of law and respect for human rights, we are determined to] employ coordinated efforts and action to tackle challenges including terrorism, social instability

2015-3: [Guided by our shared values and principles, including democracy, the rule of law and respect for human rights, we are determined to employ coordinated efforts and action to] new types of security threats such as the outbreak of the Ebola virus disease.

Ukraine

2015-4: We reiterate our full support for the diplomatic efforts of the Normandy format and the Trilateral Contact Group

2015-5: We reiterate our support for the multinational effort to secure and return to an environmentally safe condition at the site of the Chernobyl nuclear accident.

2015-6: We are committed to make the conference of donors to be held in London on April 29th a success and to take our responsibility to bring the projects to a successful completion.

Syria, Iraq, ISIL/Da'esh

2015-7: G7 countries will, in close coordination with regional partners, actively contribute to the coalition's working groups on stabilisation

2015-8: [G7 countries will, in close coordination with regional partners, actively contribute to the coalition's working groups on] strategic counter-messaging

2015-9: [G7 countries will, in close coordination with regional partners, actively contribute to the coalition's working groups on] foreign terrorist fighters

2015-10: [G7 countries will, in close coordination with regional partners, actively contribute to the coalition's working groups on] countering terrorist financing, including disrupting revenues from oil assets

2015-11: [G7 countries will, in close coordination with regional partners, actively contribute to the coalition's working groups on] military action.

Syria

2015-12: We express our full support for the UN Special Envoy for Syria de Mistura's efforts to bring about a political transition to peace.

2015-13: We call for and will actively support renewed efforts for an inclusive Syrian-led political process, in line with the Geneva Communiqué and which addresses the legitimate grievances of all components of Syrian society.

2015-14: We are committed to continuing and broadening the support we are providing to the neighbouring countries most affected by the crisis, as agreed at the Berlin Conference on the Syrian Refugee Situation

2015-15: We are also committed to increase our support to people in need, on the basis of UNSC Resolution 2165.

Iraq

2015-16: We commit to continue our support for Iraq's unity, sovereignty and territorial integrity through political and economic cooperation and military means to enable Iraq to degrade and defeat ISIL/Da'esh.

2015-17: We will continue to provide humanitarian assistance

Iran / nuclear issues

2015-17: We support the continuation of the efforts by the E3/EU+3 and Iran with a view to achieving a comprehensive solution by June 30 that will ensure the exclusively peaceful nature of Iran's nuclear programme going forward and ensure Iran does not acquire nuclear weapons.

Libya

2015-18: We underline our commitment to hold accountable those responsible for human rights violations.

2015-19: We reaffirm our commitment to enforce UNSC resolutions on Libya including arms embargo.

Tunisia

2015-20: We will continue to work with the Government of Tunisia as it strengthens security, and advances, uninterrupted, the democratic transition that the country has worked so hard to achieve.

2015-21: We will strengthen our support to the Tunisian authorities and society at large in support to the democratic transition.

Middle East Peace Process

2015-22: We reaffirm our commitment to supporting an end to the conflict and our readiness to contribute actively to a negotiated solution of all final status issues.

2015-23: We support the Quartet's efforts, including regular and direct outreach to Arab States.

Afghanistan

2015-24: We reiterate our long-term commitment to an enduring partnership with the Government of Afghanistan to foster a stable, prosperous and democratic future for Afghanistan and the greater region.

2015-25: We remain committed to supporting the Afghan Government in its efforts to undertake key reforms

2015-26: [We remain committed to supporting the Afghan Government in its efforts to] further improve governance and the rule of law

2015-27: [We remain committed to supporting the Afghan Government in its efforts to] promote the respect of human rights, including women's rights

2015-28: [We remain committed to supporting the Afghan Government in its efforts to] fight corruption

2015-29: [We remain committed to supporting the Afghan Government in its efforts to] counter narcotics

2015-30: [We remain committed to supporting the Afghan Government in its efforts to] improve fiscal sustainability

2015-31: [We remain committed to supporting the Afghan Government in its efforts to] foster inclusive economic growth.

2015-32: We remain committed to supporting an inclusive Afghan-led and Afghan-owned process of reconciliation.

Ebola

2015-33: We reiterate our firm commitment to end the Ebola epidemic by reducing to zero - and sustaining at zero - cases through continued and appropriate emergency aid and support to recovery plans.

2015-34: We will collectively assist around the world, including in West Africa, to achieve common targets to prevent future outbreaks from becoming epidemics.

2015-35: We seek to achieve all common targets set by the World Health Organization's International Health Regulations and the Global Health Security Agenda.

African Peace and Security Architecture (APSA)

2015-36: We reaffirm our commitment to support them in the framework of APSA.

2015-37: We agree to cooperate more closely in preventing conflicts and tackling the root causes of instability, fragility and conflict.

Mali

2015-38: We will continue to support Mali in its quest for sustainable and inclusive peace

2015-39: We support the efforts of MINUSMA towards helping Mali achieve the peace process.

Central African Republic

2015-40: We reiterate our strong support for the people of the Central African Republic in their pursuit of peace, justice, and reconciliation

Somalia

2015-41: We will continue to stand behind the New Deal Compact for Somalia, agreed by the Somali Federal Government, the Somali people and international partners in conformity with Vision 2016, including by supporting state/institution-building. We urge the Government to make progress in view of the 2016 elections.

2015-41: We will continue to support AMISOM, its troop contributors and the Somali Government in their fight against al-Shabaab and their efforts to enhance security in Somalia and the region.

2015-42: We will further urge the Government of Somalia to protect human rights, especially the rights of women and children, including in the context of the ongoing armed conflict.

Kenya

2015-43: We support crucial efforts to fight al-Shabaab through the African Union Mission in Somalia

Sudan

2015-43: We will continue to support the African Union High Implementation Panel (AU-HIP)-led process to reach a ceasefire agreements between the Government of Sudan (GOS) and the Sudan Revolutionary Front (SRF).

South Sudan

2015-44: We support the establishment of an enhanced framework for peace negotiations reaffirming the crucial role of the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD), the African Union (AU) and other important actors to swiftly get peace negotiations back on track.

2015-45: We support the use of the full range of multilateral, bilateral and regional tools to increase pressure, in accordance with UNSC Resolution 2206, on both sides to resolve all outstanding issues without further delay.

2015-46: We reiterate our support to UNMISS and its action for the protection of civilians and the stabilisation of the security situation.

Sahel

2015-47: We strongly support the increased efforts between and among affected Sahelian states in addressing the various challenges to the region, including insecurity from terrorist threat, low level of human development, demographic pressures and the impact of climate change.

2015-48: We will continue to support capacity building and assistance to address poverty and instability in the region.

2015-49: We will continue to support the efforts of the region to address the security and development challenges including the fight against illicit trade in small arms and light weapons.

Counter Terrorism

2015-50: The G7 will also continue to address the use of the internet for terrorist purposes such as radicalisation to violence, recruitment, financing or planning of terrorist attacks

2015-51: we will continue to promote counter-narrative initiatives.

2015-52: G7 members are committed to providing appropriate support to the follow-on activities inspired by the U.S.-hosted Summit on Countering Violent Extremism and the related leaders' meeting to be held in New York in September.

2015-53: Therefore, G7 states are determined to continue to reach out to relevant partners, including regional organisations, bilaterally or in multilateral frameworks.

2015-54: The G7 commits to remain actively engaged in the work underway in other multilateral fora such as the United Nations, the GCTF and the Counter-ISIL coalition.

Climate and Security

2015-55: We therefore reaffirm the G7 commitment to fully support efforts to reach, in Paris in December 2015, a protocol, another legal instrument or an agreed outcome with legal force under the Convention that promotes ambition, applies to all parties and reflects evolving national circumstances.

2015-56: We have decided to set up and task a working group with evaluating the study's recommendations up to the end of 2015 in order for it to report back to us regarding possible implementation in time for our meeting in 2016.

2015-57: For this purpose, the group will consider the need to, inter alia, facilitate the exchange of information and views, including with interested partners affected by situations of fragility, to better work in cooperation with interested partners affected by situations of fragility

2015-58: [For this purpose, the group will consider the need to, inter alia, facilitate the exchange of information and views, including with interested partners affected by situations of fragility, to] better understand and respond to climate-fragility risks

2015-59: [For this purpose, the group will consider the need to, inter alia, facilitate the exchange of information and views, including with interested partners affected by situations of fragility, to] work with existing institutions to make better use of and conduct integrated climate and fragility risk assessments

2015-60: [For this purpose, the group will consider the need to, inter alia, facilitate the exchange of information and views, including with interested partners affected by situations of fragility, to] develop operational guidance materials.

Deauville Partnership with Arab Countries in Transition

2015-61: We will therefore further develop our collaboration through the Arab Forum on Asset Recovery (AFAR).

Non-Proliferation, disarmament, and nuclear security

2015-62: We support the United States hosting the 2016 Nuclear Security Summit and commit ourselves to work towards the goal of strengthening the global nuclear security architecture.

Human Rights

2015-63: We reaffirm our commitment to the protection and promotion of all human rights and fundamental freedoms.

2015-64: We also affirm a commitment to end all forms of discrimination.

2015-65: We will be tireless in our efforts to promote gender equality

2015-66: [We will be tireless in our efforts to] combat all forms of violence against women and girls, including their protection in conflict and ending child, early, and forced marriage.

2015-67: We will work towards safeguarding a free space for civil society, while ensuring the safety of human rights defenders.

2015-68: We express continued commitment to enhancing the role of women in conflict prevention, resolution and peacebuilding while stressing the need for the removal of barriers to their full participation.

2015-69: We reiterate our political commitment to and funding support for activities in the implementation of UNSC Resolution 1325 at the national and international level.

Declaration on Maritime Security

2015-70: We reiterate our commitment to the freedoms of navigation and overflight and other internationally lawful uses of the high seas and the exclusive economic zones

2015-71: [We reiterate our commitment to] the related rights and freedoms in other maritime zones, including the rights of innocent passage, transit passage and archipelagic sea lanes passage consistent with international law.

2015-72: We further reiterate our commitment to unimpeded lawful commerce

2015-73: [We further reiterate our commitment to] the safety and security of seafarers and passengers

2015-74: [We further reiterate our commitment to] the conservation and sustainable use of natural and marine resources including marine biodiversity.

2015-75: We are committed to maintaining a maritime order based upon the principles of international law, in particular as reflected in the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS).

2015-76: We reaffirm our commitment to further international cooperation on combating maritime security threats.

2015-77: We reaffirm our commitment to assist in tackling existing shortcomings in this regard.

2015-78: [We welcome and encourage research activities aimed at providing scientific and technological support to enhance maritime security, fostering information sharing and collaboration and, thus, adding to the sustainable use of the global maritime domain.] We support the incorporation of their findings into the development and implementation of maritime security policies, as appropriate.

Fostering regional cooperation, ownership and responsibility

2015-79: We support the establishment of functioning regional mechanisms of cooperation on enhanced maritime security.

2015-80: [We encourage States to do their utmost to implement their commitments,] and we intend to assist them within the scope of our abilities and regional priorities.

Enhancing capability development and capacity-building

2015-81: We are committed to supporting comprehensive capability development and capacity-building in regions affected by piracy and other forms of maritime crime, including in ports and coastal waters, in order to enable and enhance the capacity of coastal states, regional and interregional maritime security regimes.

Intensifying information-sharing and advancing maritime domain awareness

2015-82: We support regional and international initiatives on information-sharing, maritime awareness and surveillance, such as the Maritime Safety and Security Information System (MSSIS) and the EU's Common Information Sharing Environment (CISE), as competent authorities' and seafarers' access to timely and accurate information about incidents and developments related to maritime security, including as regards ships' cargo, is essential for rapid and adequate response.

2015-83: We support regional organisations, coastal states and the shipping industry in their endeavours, such as the Maritime Trade and Information Sharing Centre – Gulf of Guinea project, to work together to collect and share information, in the pursuit of the best possible maritime situation awareness.

2015-84: We aim to extend maritime information-sharing and surveillance beyond existing formats, within the parameters of our respective national laws and policies, with the aim of eventually creating comprehensive situational awareness of the global maritime domain.

Fighting trafficking in human beings and smuggling of migrants

2015-85: We support the work of international organisations in this field.

2015-86: We aim to combat these crimes and address the political and socio-economic drivers of irregular migration.

2015-87: We support risk-based surveillance of goods movement in the maritime domain, consistent with international law, in the fight against terrorist and organised crime activities such as smuggling of goods, trafficking of weapons and narcotics, along with cross-border movements of proceeds of this illegal trade.

2015-88: Strengthening good governance and boosting economic development

2015-89: We support economic development in coastal states in order to enhance social and political integration and to reduce structural factors inherent in instability or conflict.

2015-90: [We support] the creation of alternative employment opportunities in coastal states [in order to enhance social and political integration and to reduce structural factors inherent in instability or conflict.]

2015-91: [We support] the provision of basic social services [in coastal states in order to enhance social and political integration and to reduce structural factors inherent in instability or conflict.]

2015-92: We strive to address these challenges within the parameters of our respective national priorities and programmes in areas prone to piracy and other forms of maritime crime.

2015-93: Promoting maritime governance to preserve coastal livelihoods and marine biodiversity

2015-94: We intend to step up efforts to ensure the implementation of measures and regulations aimed at preventing illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing and conserving and managing fish stocks, such as the United Nations Agreement on the Conservation and Management of Straddling Fish Stocks and Highly Migratory Fish Stocks and the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) Agreement on Port State Measures to Prevent, Deter and Eliminate Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated Fishing (PSMA).

G7 Statement on Non-Proliferation and Disarmament

2015-95: We are committed to seeking a safer world for all and to creating the conditions for a world without nuclear weapons in a way that promotes international stability and stresses the vital importance of non-proliferation for achieving this goal.

2015-96: We remain committed to the universalisation of all relevant multilateral treaties and agreements that contribute to preventing and combating proliferation – in particular, the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) and the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BTWC).

2015-97: We commit to and expect full implementation of these treaties and compliance with the obligations contained therein.

Ninth Review Conference of the NPT

2015-98: Regarding the upcoming ninth NPT Review Conference, which will be held in 2015, 45 years after the NPT's entry into force and 70 years after the atomic bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the end of World War II, we reaffirm our unconditional support for all three mutually reinforcing pillars of the NPT.

2015-99: We remain fully committed to the implementation of all items of the Action Plan

2015-100: The G7 remains committed to the objective of a Middle East free of WMD and their means of delivery.

2015-101: Therefore, the G7 strongly supports the goal of a zone free of nuclear weapons, as well as other WMD and their means of delivery in the Middle East.

Nuclear Proliferation Challenges

2015-102: We reaffirm our strong commitment to a diplomatic solution with regard to the Iranian nuclear programme

2015-103: We support diplomatic efforts to bring DPRK into compliance with its obligations under UNSCRs and its commitments under the 2005 Joint Statement.

Peaceful Use of Nuclear Energy

2015-104: We reiterate our willingness to cooperate with States that meet their nuclear non-proliferation obligations and that wish to develop a peaceful civil nuclear programme with full transparency that meets the highest standards of safety, security, non-proliferation and respect for the environment.

2015-105: We also affirm our support for the IAEA's Technical Cooperation Programme and Peaceful Uses Initiative as effective means to promote the benefits of nuclear technology in areas such as human health, agriculture, water management and industrial applications as well as energy to meet the development needs of IAEA Member States.

2015-106: We support the IAEA's work to establish a bank of Low-Enriched Uranium (LEU) in Kazakhstan and urge the conclusion of a Host State Agreement at an early date.

Nuclear Security

2015-107: Acknowledging the fundamental responsibility of States in this field, we reaffirm our commitment to further strengthening and coordinating international cooperation to foster nuclear security.

2015-108: We will strive to draw on the NSS momentum to achieve sustainability of results and ideas created, developed and implemented during the NSS process.

2015-109: We support efforts to strengthen the international cooperation and coordination on efforts to counter the illicit trafficking of these materials, including the IAEA's Incident and Trafficking Database (ITDB) and Interpol's Operation Fail Safe, which tracks the transnational movements of known traffickers.

The Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG)

2015-110: We also support discussions on the IAEA Additional Protocol as a condition of supply.

Chemical Weapons

2015-111: We reaffirm our unconditional support for the CWC and the work of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW).

2015-112: We continue our efforts to achieve universalisation and effective implementation of the CWC as we commemorate the 100th anniversary of the first massive use of chemical weapons during World War I.

Biological Weapons

2015-113: We also strongly support the universalisation of the BTWC and encourage further efforts to maintain and strengthen compliance with the Convention.

2015-114: We seek agreement at the Eighth Review Conference on a substantive agenda of measures to enhance confidence in the Convention and inject new dynamism into the BTWC process.

2015-115: We will work hard with partners from all regions to seek consensus among States Parties.

2015-116: We recommit to full implementation of the World Health Organization's International Health Regulations.

Addressing the Proliferation of WMD and their Means of Delivery

2015-117: We will continue to work through the regimes to reduce the global proliferation threat

2015-118: The G7 States are committed to the universalisation of the HCoC and to promoting transparency on ballistic missiles.

2015-119: We reaffirm our unwavering commitment to the Global Partnership Against the Spread of Weapons and Material of Mass Destruction (Global Partnership, GP).

2015-120: The GP will continue to promote the goal of securing nuclear materials following the 2016 NSS.

2015-121: We support the Proliferation Security Initiative (PSI), which is important to counter proliferation

2015-122: We are strongly committed to undertaking further measures in order to enhance the capabilities and authorities required to interdict shipments of WMD, their means of delivery and related materials to and from States and non-State actors of proliferation concern.

Small Arms and Light Weapons

2015-123: We will contribute to this endeavour in the framework of a regional conference with States and regional organisations in the Sahel and other parts of sub-Saharan Africa as well.

2015-124: We will continue to offer our cooperation to interested States, taking into consideration the role of up-to-date technology and best practices in physical security and stockpile management, as well as marking and tracing of weapons.

Outer Space

2015-125: In this context, we reiterate our commitment to preserve a safe, secure and sustainable outer space environment and to ensure the peaceful exploration and use of outer space on an equitable and mutually acceptable basis in accordance with international law.

2015-126: In this vein, the G7 supports and encourages constructive discussions on the development and implementation of Transparency and Confidence-Building Measures (TCBMs) to enhance stability in space.

2015-127: Taking into account the recommendations of the UN Group of Governmental Experts (GGE) in their report of 29 July 2013, we are strongly committed to further promoting urgently needed TCBMs in outer space by finalising an International Code of Conduct for Outer Space Activities in 2015.

2015-128: We also support the efforts to complete the draft Guidelines on Long-Term Sustainability for Space Activities by the UN Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space, as well as the Committee's consideration of the GGE recommendations on TCBMs at their June 2015 meeting.

Beyond Ebola: A G7 Agenda to Help Prevent Future Crises and Enhance Security in Africa

2015-129: Our aim remains to get the number of new Ebola cases across the region down to zero as soon as possible.

2015-130: By building on established patterns of cooperation within the framework of these organisations, looking at concurring initiatives in different African regions and spreading success stories of individual organisations to other regions, we strive to strengthen capacities and governance within as well as between African regional organisations.

Preparing for epidemics / new types of crises

2015-131: We underscored our willingness to provide relief to the countries ravaged by the virus

2015-132: [We underscored our] intention to enter into a dialogue with the most affected countries, neighbouring states and international partners.

2015-133: Today, we reiterate our commitment by ensuring sustained efforts to fight this disease and its consequences, in close cooperation with African partners, the United Nations, the World Health Organisation and the international community.

2015-134: [Today, we reiterate our commitment to] improve preparedness to prevent and fight the spreading of other infectious diseases, [in close cooperation with African partners, the United Nations, the World Health Organisation and the international community.]

We strive to:

2015-135: intensify support and capacity building (for national level) with regard to the health sector in close collaboration with the WHO, global health partnerships and health sector donors, while encouraging increased national sustainable investment in the health sector to develop and improve the national capacities required by the WHO's International Health Regulations, including laboratories and surveillance and tracing systems

2015-136: enhance regional epidemic preparedness by strengthening regional authorities, e.g. the West African Health Organisation (WAHO) and the IGAD Health Program, for preventing and fighting diseases, including neglected tropical diseases,

2015-137: [enhance regional epidemic preparedness by] supporting the development of regional mechanisms for sharing disease surveillance information and analysis, taking into account the reflections within ECOWAS and IGAD to establish a regional Center for Disease Control and the newly proposed AU Center for Disease Control,

2015-138: [enhance regional epidemic preparedness by] promoting, based on the experience of ASEOWA, the setting up of regional pools of rapidly deployable experts for responding to potentially emerging new health security crises early

2015-138: [enhance regional epidemic preparedness by] facilitating exchange on best practice in combating the current Ebola outbreak,

2015-139: [enhance regional epidemic preparedness by] taking into account that the involvement and active participation of local communities in the fight against the epidemic is crucial;

2015-140: assure best possible support for international health-care workers in the field including medical evacuation where appropriate, in the event they contract the virus;

2015-141: promote, based on a comprehensive lessons-learnt process regarding the Ebola outbreak in West Africa and drawing from the relevant WHO resolution, the development of a coordinated international and regional preparation for health security crises and to develop and refine measures to this end, including research and development on treatments, vaccines and diagnostics;

In this respect, we aim to:

2015-142: support capacity building with governments on crisis management and crisis communication as well as awareness-raising;

2015-143: [support capacity building with] regional bodies on crisis management and crisis communication as well as awareness-raising;

2015-144: [support capacity building with] civil societies on crisis management and crisis communication as well as awareness-raising;

2015-145: [support capacity building with] the private sector on crisis management and crisis communication as well as awareness-raising;

2015-146: envisage a dialogue with African partners on the results of exchanges among the G7 on necessary and/or existing assets for the response to new types of crises. This should include the work on identifying fields of excellence, i. a. in the science and research sector, among the G7 to prepare for future crises;

Promoting biological security

we strive to:

2015-147: support capacity development and training to augment prevention, detection, preparedness and response in case of outbreaks of highly infectious diseases and other events relating to biological security;

2015-148: improve surveillance, detection, diagnostics capabilities (including specialised laboratories), and multi-sectoral workforce skills needed to prevent, detect, instantly share information and rapidly respond to outbreaks of highly infectious diseases;

2015-149: achieve sustainability including through focussing on issues such as equipment maintenance, enhancing and maintaining facilities, and human resources management, including relevant training (e.g. "train the trainer" activities);

2015-150: strengthen human and veterinary public health systems, including through providing training, and assisting with skill development;

2015-151: improve the management and, where possible, consolidation and reduction of holdings of potentially dangerous biological material and samples

2015-152: support the establishment and strengthening of biosecurity and biosafety systems within the country;

2015-153: work towards common targets for measuring assistance to accelerate health security implementation;

2015-154: enhance the work of national and regional biological safety associations;

2015-155: strengthen interregional and international cooperation, including through making best use of international fora, such as the African Union, WHO, the FAO, the OIE, the United Nations Security Council Committee pursuant to resolution 1540 (2004) and the Biological and Toxins Weapons Convention.

Improving border management / cross border collaboration

2015-156: The aim is to make borders safe yet open for legitimate transport of services, goods, and people while securing against negative aspects.

In light of this, we commit to:

2015-157: intensify and extend cross-border cooperation in general in the framework of regional integration mechanisms;

2015-158: help to enhance capacities in the field of border control, border management and cross-border cooperation in line with international health regulations and ongoing regional efforts in support of the African Peace and Security Architecture.

2015-159: Support existing regional regimes and international initiatives in the field of border areas management, such as in the AU Border Program by building on synergies, where possible

2015-160: help develop regulations and capacities for cross-border cooperation in areas such as health, water or land-related issues, conflict management and management of cross-border traffic (building on the AU Convention on Cross-Border Cooperation);

2015-161: strengthen cooperation between existing border protection activities of the United Nations, non-governmental organisations and relevant government agencies to ensure assistance 2015-162: to individuals in need of protection, including refugees, internally displaced populations, returnees, hard to reach pastoralist and cross border mobile populations. [Particularly vulnerable groups are refugees, who are at risk of being abducted or subjected to violence (sexual or gender based or other) or exploitation. In response to local needs and requirements, special attention will be given to aspects of good governance, human rights and a "people-to-people approach" which were also highlighted in the frameworks and programmes of the Rabat Process and Khartoum Process]

2015-163: intensify regional cooperation, with a focus on the rule of law, the fight against trafficking in persons and narcotics, terrorism and against the spread of small arms and light weapons (SALW) as well as the promotion of legal cross-border transit, bearing in mind the overall link between security and development. [Particular efforts will be aimed at the intensification of the Sahel-Maghreb cooperation, in accordance with UN and EU Sahel strategies and with the G5 Sahel action plan, and SALW control in the Greater Sahel region by coordinating joint activities between donors, regional organisations including the AU and ECOWAS and countries in the region.]

2015-164: We will review progress at our next meeting.

2016 Japan

N=115

Joint Communiqué

Preamble

2016-1: We are determined to employ coordinated efforts and action to tackle global challenges including terrorism and violent extremism, political instability as well as new types of security threats or non-traditional threats. (peace and security)

Regions and the World

Countering Terrorism and Violent Extremism

2016-2: We strongly support the Coalition's resolve to intensify and accelerate the campaign against ISIL/Da'esh in Iraq and Syria and to bolster humanitarian assistance for those affected by ISIL/Da'esh and affiliated groups. (terrorism)

2016-3: We will continue to enhance our coordination to support countries in need of building their capacity to improve information sharing on known and suspected terrorists (terrorism)

2016-4: [We will continue] to improve border and transport security to eliminate safe havens for terrorist organizations and individuals. (terrorism)

2016-5: We will continue to work together to prevent the flow of foreign terrorist fighters and terrorism-related goods, as well as the financing of terrorist organizations. (terrorism)

2016-6: In particular, we support the goals set out in the Rabat Memorandum on Good Practices for Effective Counterterrorism Practice in the Criminal Justice Sector (terrorism)

2016-7: [we support] development of effective justice sector Central Authorities to facilitate the sharing of information. (terrorism)

2016-8: We are committed to achieving improved global aviation security and will continue to work closely with partners and through international organizations towards that goal. (terrorism)

2016-9: In that regard, we express our support for INTERPOL's Action Plan announced at the September 2015 Leaders' Summit on Countering ISIL and Violent Extremism (terrorism)

2016-10: [we] undertake to consider how we can help other countries enhance their connectivity between National Central Bureaus and points of entry. (terrorism)

2016-11: We also express support for International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO)'s Traveler Identification Program (TRIP) and efforts to deter the use of fraudulent travel documents (terrorism)

2016-12: [We also express support for] the World Customs Organization's Security Program and its capacity building initiatives for border security. (terrorism)

2016-13: We will in particular work together to improve our collective understanding of the drivers of violent extremism and radicalization to violence, and of the most effective efforts to address these. (terrorism)

2016-14: We call for the full implementation of the relevant Security Council resolutions, including resolutions 2178, 2199 and 2253 to fight this threat. The G7 will continue to make coordinated efforts towards this end, being mindful of the synergy created among our individual efforts. (terrorism)

2016-15: We also seek continued cooperation with the private sector, civil society and communities to address terrorist and violent extremist propaganda by empowering credible voices to counter these messages with positive alternatives. The G7 will continue to make coordinated efforts towards this end. (terrorism)

Syria

2016-16: We reiterate our support to the High Negotiations Committee. (regional security)

2016-17: We reiterate our strong commitment to supporting the resilience of the Syrian refugees and internally displaced persons, and their host communities inside and outside Syria (human rights)

2016-18: [We reiterate our strong commitment] to working towards a long-term, sustainable post-conflict stabilization and rehabilitation of Syria. (regional security)

Refugees, Irregular Migrants and Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs)

2016-19: We will also strengthen efforts to fight against smuggling of migrants and trafficking in persons, in partnership with countries of origin, transit and destination (human rights)

Iraq

2016-20: We commit our continued support for the unity, sovereignty and territorial integrity of Iraq. (regional security)

2016-21: We support Prime Minister al-Abadi and his government's efforts to continue and accelerate reforms in order to enhance the participation of all Iraqis regardless of their origin or beliefs through national reconciliation and inclusive governance. (good governance)

2016-22: We commit to support Iraq's efforts to address its fiscal challenges. (regional security)

2016-23: The G7 affirms our commitment to work together, including with the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the international financial institutions, to provide and expedite financing for Iraq as appropriate, in support of its economic reform program and efforts to directly address fiscal vulnerabilities. (regional security)

Iran

2016-24: The G7 will continue to actively support its full and effective implementation, including activities of the IAEA which is responsible for monitoring and verifying Iran's nuclear-related commitments. (nonproliferation)

Ukraine/Russia

2016-25: We remain fully committed to Ukraine's reform agenda, and to providing long-term support to this end. (regional security)

2016-26: We will continue to work together with the international financial institutions and other partners to provide financial and technical assistance. (regional security)

2016-27: We remain committed to the Rome G7 Energy Initiative for Energy Security to build a more diverse and resilient international energy system. (energy)

Libya

2016-28: We express our full support to United Nations Special Representative of the Secretary General Kobler's efforts to facilitate the full implementation of the Libyan Political Agreement as signed in Skhirat on December 17 2015. (regional security)

Afghanistan

2016-29: We stand firm in our commitment to Afghanistan and its people and welcome the continuation of the NATO-led international engagement in the train, advise and assist mission to strengthen the Afghan National Defense and Security Forces (ANDSF). (regional security)

2016-30: We remain steadfast in our support of the government of Afghanistan as it undertakes reforms towards good governance, strengthening electoral systems, sustainable development, the effective delivery of basic services, measures on anti-corruption and counter-narcotics, as well as promoting respect for rule of law and human rights, in particular the rights of women. (good governance)

Yemen

2016-31: We reiterate our strong support for the UN Special Envoy in his efforts to end the violence in Yemen and bring all parties back to the negotiating table so the country can resume its political transition, based on UN Security Council resolution 2216 and other relevant UN Security Council resolutions. (regional security)

Deauville Partnership

2016-32: We reiterate our commitment to the implementation of the Deauville Partnership, in order to address the political, economic and social challenges faced by the Arab countries in transition (ACTs). (development)

2016-33: We remain committed to supporting ACTs in order to foster sound financial and economic evolution through long term structural reforms and improved governance in support of economic development and stability and democratization. (development)

Africa

2016-34: We reiterate our commitment to invest in our bilateral and multilateral partnerships with African countries to support peace and sustainable development across Africa based on their ownership through implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development including the Sustainable Development Goals and the Addis Ababa Action Agenda, as well as through the Tokyo International Conference on African Development (TICAD), the EU-Africa partnership and the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit. (development)

2016-35: To this end, we will continue our support for African partners, including the African Union and the relevant sub-regional organizations, in addressing challenges in the areas of security, governance, stability, economic management and development in the continent, including countries like Burundi, the Central African Republic, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan and the Sahel and Horn of Africa regions. (development)

Global Issues

Cyber Issues

2016-36: We reaffirm our commitment to a multi-stakeholder approach to Internet governance, which includes full and active participation by governments, private sector, civil society, the technical community, and international organizations, among others. (ICT)

2016-37: We commit to utilizing ICTs in addressing global issues and achieving progress on the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. (ICT)

2016-38: We commit to strengthening our cooperation in promoting the rule of law in cyberspace, capacity building, confidence building, and the fight against cybercrime. (ICT)

Space

2016-39: We are committed to enhancing the long-term safety, security, sustainability and stability of the space environment (peace and security)

2016-40: [We are committed] to increasing transparency in space activities (transparency)

2016-41: [We are committed] to strengthening norms of responsible behavior for all outer space activities. (peace and security)

Climate Change and Security

2016-42: We will actively and constructively engage in efforts to develop and adopt rules and guidelines for the effective implementation of the Paris Agreement. (climate change)

2016-43: We welcome the decision in Dubai by the Montreal Protocol parties to work to address hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) under the Montreal Protocol, and support adoption of a Montreal Protocol HFC phase-down amendment in 2016, and intend to provide additional support through the Multilateral Fund following adoption of an amendment for its implementation. (climate change)

2016-44: We reiterate that climate change poses a serious threat to global security and economic prosperity and shared the view that foreign policy must contribute to addressing this challenge effectively. (climate change)

2016-45: We will work to prioritize prevention of climate fragility risks by aligning our efforts toward the common goal of increasing resilience and reducing fragility in the face of global climate change, including taking steps to integrate climate-fragility considerations across our national governments. (climate change)

Human Rights

2016-46: We affirm our commitment to the promotion and protection of human rights. (human rights)

2016-47: We will work towards ensuring the safety of human rights defenders and of civil society more broadly (human rights)

2016-48: [We will work] toward supporting the vital network of human rights and civil society organizations despite the increasing restrictions being placed on them. (human rights)

Peacekeeping and Peacebuilding

2016-49: We support the ongoing reform process on UN peace operations and peacebuilding (peace and security)

Anti-Corruption

2016-50: We support the major anti-corruption summit hosted by the UK on May 12, which will, in conjunction with the work done within the G7, the G20, the Conference of States Parties to the UN Convention against Corruption, the OECD Ministerial on the Anti-Bribery Convention and other relevant international fora, help to galvanize action against corruption, and set priorities for the international community over the next 3 to 5 years. (crime and corruption)

Global Health and Global Health Security

2016-51: We remain committed to assist the implementation of the World Health Organization's International Health Regulations (2005), in cooperation with the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) and the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), using common and measurable targets to achieve national capacity to prepare for… health emergencies and biological threats, whether naturally occurring, deliberate, or accidental, including through various initiatives, such as the Global Health Security Agenda. (health)

2016-52: [We remain committed to assist the implementation of the World Health Organization's International Health Regulations (2005), in cooperation with the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) and the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), using common and measurable targets to achieve national capacity to] prevent [health emergencies and biological threats, whether naturally occurring, deliberate, or accidental, including through various initiatives, such as the Global Health Security Agenda] (health)

2016-53: [We remain committed to assist the implementation of the World Health Organization's International Health Regulations (2005), in cooperation with the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) and the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), using common and measurable targets to achieve national capacity to] detect [health emergencies and biological threats, whether naturally occurring, deliberate, or accidental, including through various initiatives, such as the Global Health Security Agenda] (health)

2016-54: [We remain committed to assist the implementation of the World Health Organization's International Health Regulations (2005), in cooperation with the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) and the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), using common and measurable targets to achieve national capacity to] notify [health emergencies and biological threats, whether naturally occurring, deliberate, or accidental, including through various initiatives, such as the Global Health Security Agenda] (health)

2016-55: [We remain committed to assist the implementation of the World Health Organization's International Health Regulations (2005), in cooperation with the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) and the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), using common and measurable targets to achieve national capacity to] respond to [health emergencies and biological threats, whether naturally occurring, deliberate, or accidental, including through various initiatives, such as the Global Health Security Agenda] (health)

2016-56: We also remain committed to the replenishment of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria (health)

2016-57: [We also remain committed to] assisting Ebola affected countries recovering from the devastating impacts of the epidemic while strengthening the capacities of their health systems. (health)

2016-58: We intend to take further action in the G20 and UN General Assembly this year, building on the commitments of the WHO Global Action Plan on AMR. (health)

2016-59: We reiterate our commitment to the Global Partnership Against the Spread of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction, and welcome its work, in particular, to strengthen capacities against biological threats. (nonproliferation)

Hiroshima Declaration on Nuclear Disarmament and Non-Proliferation

2016-60: In this historic meeting, we reaffirm our commitment to seeking a safer world for all and to creating the conditions for a world without nuclear weapons in a way that promotes international stability.

2016-61: We emphasize our strong commitment to the NPT in all aspects.

2016-62: We strongly support the full implementation of the provisions of the NPT across all three of its "pillars" (non-proliferation, disarmament, and the peaceful uses of nuclear energy).

2016-63: In accordance with Article VI of the NPT, we will be persistent and active advocates of continued reductions in nuclear weapons globally, and call upon all states to make such efforts.

We will actively implement the Final Communique and the Action Plans of the 2016 Nuclear Security Summit and will support the central role of the IAEA in this area.

2016-64: We are committed to the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and will continue to work with the IAEA to promote the highest standards of non-proliferation, nuclear safety and security.

Statement on Maritime Security

2016-65: Recognizing the importance of the oceans, we, the Foreign Ministers of Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, the United States of America and High Representative of the European Union, reaffirm our commitment to further international cooperation on maritime security

2016-66: [Recognizing the importance of the oceans, we, the Foreign Ministers of Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, the United States of America and High Representative of the European Union, reaffirm our commitment to further international cooperation on maritime] safety.

2016-67: We reiterate our commitment to the freedoms of navigation and overflight and other internationally lawful uses of the high seas

2016-68: [We reiterate our commitment to the] exclusive economic zones

2016-69: [We reiterate our commitment to] the related rights and freedoms in other maritime zones, including the rights of innocent passage, transit passage and archipelagic sea lanes passage consistent with international law.

2016-70: [We] express our continued commitment to pursue international cooperation to combat [piracy and armed robbery at sea]

2016-71: [We] express our continued commitment to pursue international cooperation to combat [transnational organized crime and terrorism in the maritime domain]

2016-72: [We] express our continued commitment to pursue international cooperation to combat [trafficking in persons]

2016-73: [We] express our continued commitment to pursue international cooperation to combat [the smuggling of migrants]

2016-74: [We] express our continued commitment to pursue international cooperation to combat [illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing]

2016-75: [We] express our continued commitment to pursue international cooperation to combat other maritime activities that threaten global stability, security and prosperity.

2016-76: We share the determination to target the causes of illegal maritime activities and cooperate through capacity building assistance for maritime security and safety in such areas as maritime governance, coast guard, disaster relief, maritime search and rescue, and maritime information sharing and integration, as well as legislative, judicial, prosecutorial and correctional assistance in order to help coastal states to deal with their own vulnerabilities.

2016-77: We further seek to build cooperation regarding the development of a future legally binding instrument under UNCLOS on the conservation and sustainable use of marine biological diversity of areas beyond national jurisdiction.

2016-78: Recognizing the importance of maintaining the sea as governed by the rule of law, which is indispensable for the peace and prosperity of the international community, we, as G7, are committed to further action on maritime security.

G7 Statement on Non-proliferation and Disarmament

2016-79: Against this background, as explicitly expressed in the G7 Foreign Ministers' Hiroshima Declaration, we are committed to seeking a safer world for all and to taking practical and concrete steps, enumerated as below, in the fields of nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation

2016-80: [Against this background, as explicitly expressed in the G7 Foreign Ministers' Hiroshima Declaration, we are committed to seeking a safer world for all and to taking practical and concrete steps, enumerated as below, in the fields of] nuclear security and safety

2016-81: [Against this background, as explicitly expressed in the G7 Foreign Ministers' Hiroshima Declaration, we are committed to seeking a safer world for all and to taking practical and concrete steps, enumerated as below, in the fields of] peaceful uses of nuclear energy

2016-82: [Against this background, as explicitly expressed in the G7 Foreign Ministers' Hiroshima Declaration, we are committed to seeking a safer world for all and to taking practical and concrete steps, enumerated as below, in the fields of] non-proliferation of other weapons of mass destruction (WMD)

2016-83: [Against this background, as explicitly expressed in the G7 Foreign Ministers' Hiroshima Declaration, we are committed to seeking a safer world for all and to taking practical and concrete steps, enumerated as below, in the fields of] control of small arms and light weapons, and outer space.

Nuclear Disarmament and Non-Proliferation

2016-84: In conjunction with the G7 Foreign Ministers' Hiroshima Declaration, we reaffirm our unconditional support for all three mutually reinforcing pillars of NPT

2016-85: We encourage further development of the IMS and the IDC, and commit, in accordance with applicable laws and regulations, to providing strong political support and adequate resources to complete the Treaty's verification regime.

2016-86: We strongly support practical and concrete initiatives which encourage cooperation between nuclear-weapon States and non-nuclear-weapon States to help address the complex challenges involved in the verification of nuclear disarmament such as the UK/Norway Initiative and the International Partnership for Nuclear Disarmament Verification.

WMD Non-Proliferation

2016-87: We reaffirm our shared objective to achieve a diplomatic resolution to North Korea's nuclear and missile issues.

2016-88: We underscore our determination to continue our support to the FFM

2016-89: [We underscore our determination to continue our support to] the OPCW-UN Joint Investigative Mechanism (JIM)

2016-90: [We underscore our determination to continue our support to] the OPCW's Declaration Assessment Team (DAT)

2016-91: We pledge to do our utmost to ensure that all necessary resources, including financial ones, are made available to the IAEA, which assumes the critical responsibility in monitoring and verification to confirm that Iran is meeting its JCPOA commitments.

2016-92: We support the IAEA's efforts to modernize its safeguards information technology infrastructure by improving tools and applications available to strengthen information security of the safeguards network.

2016-93: We support further discussions within the NSG towards the establishment of the IAEA Additional Protocol as a condition of supply in the Group's Guidelines.

2016-94: We remain committed to the universalization of the Hague Code of Conduct Against Ballistic Missile Proliferation

2016-95: [We remain committed to] promoting appropriate transparency measures on ballistic missile and space launch programs, as the proliferation of missiles, especially those capable of delivering WMD, poses a threat to international peace and security.

2016-96: We reaffirm our unwavering commitment to the Global Partnership Against the Spread of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction (GP), which continues to address WMD proliferation threats that exist worldwide, and its funding programs and coordinating activities to combat chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear (CBRN) terrorism.

2016-97: We remain committed to achieving a world safe and secure from biological threats.

2016-98: We strongly support the 2nd Comprehensive Review of UNSCR 1540, a resolution that continues to provide an opportunity to strengthen further the efficiency of our efforts to combat proliferation of WMDs and their means of delivery and their potential acquisition by non-state actors, with a view to assessing implementation of the resolution and to improving the assistance process to promote full implementation as soon as possible.

2016-99: We reaffirm our support for the CWC and the work of the OPCW and continue our efforts to achieve universalization and effective implementation of the CWC.

2016-100: [We note with grave concern the allegations of manufacture and use of chemical weapons by ISIL/Da'esh,] and express our commitment to working with and through the OPCW and other relevant venues to mitigate the serious threat to international security posed by terrorist use of chemical weapons.

2016-101: We strongly support the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention as a cornerstone of the international legal regime banning biological weapons

Nuclear Security and Safety

2016-102: We will continue to support and advocate for strengthening and sustaining further the security of nuclear and other radioactive material.

2016-103: We applaud the success of the fourth Nuclear Security Summit hosted by U.S. President Obama on March 31-April 1, 2016 and, building upon the outcomes of the Nuclear Security Summit process, commit ourselves to further strengthening and coordinating international cooperation on nuclear security, through the United Nations, IAEA, INTERPOL, GICNT and GP Action Plans.

2016-104: We support practical and concrete initiatives such as the CBRN Risk Mitigation Centres of Excellence Initiative of the Instrument contributing to Stability and Peace, which permits the EU, together with regional partners, to strengthen CBRN safety and security and thus mitigate CBRN risks in eight regions of the world.

2016-105: [We recognize the achievements that the international community has made on nuclear safety since the Fukushima Daiichi accident and IAEA's role in this regard including the implementation of the IAEA's Action Plan on Nuclear Safety and the publication of IAEA report on Fukushima Daiichi,] and reaffirm our commitment to continue our efforts to ensure highest global nuclear safety and to support the IAEA.

2016-106: We remain committed to facilitate the development of the infrastructure necessary for states embarking on a nuclear power program according to the highest standards of safety, security and non-proliferation.

2016-107: We remain committed to improving the safety and performance of nuclear and fuel cycle facilities at all stages of the lifecycle, including life extensions and end of life.

2016-108: We support efforts to enhance the implementation of the Convention on Nuclear Safety (CNS), including the February 2015 Vienna Declaration of Nuclear Safety by CNS Contracting Parties.

Peaceful Use of Nuclear Energy

2016-109: [We recognize that all State Parties to the NPT have an inalienable right to use nuclear energy for peaceful purposes in conformity with their international obligations under Articles I,II and III of the NPT,] reiterate our willingness to cooperate with States which meet their nuclear non-proliferation obligations and which wish to develop a peaceful civil nuclear program with full transparency that meets the highest standards of safety, security, non-proliferation and respect for the environment.

2016-110: We strongly support the IAEA's activities under "Atoms for Peace and Development" under the leadership of Director-General Yukiya Amano aimed at widening and deepening the benefits of peaceful uses of nuclear technology that can also contribute to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

2016-111: In this regard, we actively support the IAEA's niche expertise in contributing to the SDGs through its Technical Cooperation Program, including through providing support to the IAEA's Technical Cooperation Fund and Peaceful Uses Initiative, in order to further the IAEA's unique contribution in areas such as human health, agriculture, water management and industrial applications, as well as energy and climate change, and also recognizing and supporting the IAEA's Program of Action for Cancer Therapy and its unique expertise in early detection, proper diagnosis, treatment and care of cancer in partnership with other international organizations.

Control of Small Arms and Light Weapons

2016-112: We will strengthen cooperation to prevent the transfer of conventional arms to terrorists in the relevant frameworks such as the Wassenaar Arrangement.

2016-113 We will remain engaged in coordinating our efforts in this regard together with regional partners such as the African Union.

Outer Space

2016-114: We reaffirm our commitment, and call on all states, to review and implement, to the extent practicable, the proposed transparency and confidence-building measures contained in the recommendations of the UN Group of Governmental Experts Report (A/68/189, 29 July 2013) such as information exchange on space policies and strategies, information exchange and notifications related to outer space activities in a timely manner and an effective consultation mechanism.

2016-115: We support efforts to rapidly complete clear, practicable and proven Guidelines for Long-Term Sustainability of Outer Space Activities by the UN Committee on the Peaceful Use of Outer Space (UNCOPUOS) in June 2016 and encourage all Member States of the Committee to play a constructive role to this end.

2017 Italy

N=180

Joint Communiqué

2017-1: we are determined to coordinate our efforts in promoting the rules-based international order (peace and security)

2017-2: [we are determined to coordinate our efforts in] tackling terrorism and violent extremism (terrorism)

2017-3: : [we are determined to coordinate our efforts in] promote stability, inclusion and prosperity (peace and security)

2017-4: : [we are determined to coordinate our efforts] to support the efforts of third Countries sharing our own objectives (international cooperation)

Countering Terrorism and Violent Extremism

2017-5: in countering terrorism and violent extremism, we will continue to uphold respect for human rights…as cornerstones of our concerted action (terrorism)

2017-6: [in countering terrorism and violent extremism, we will continue to] promote fundamental freedoms…[as cornerstones of our concerted action] (terrorism)

2017-7: [in countering terrorism and violent extremism, we will continue to] foster a culture of inclusion and gender equality [as cornerstones of our concerted action] (terrorism)

2017-8: We reaffirm our commitment to promoting peaceful co-existence…as fundamental to preventing the emergence and spread of violent extremism, in all its forms. (terrorism)

2017-9: [We reaffirm our commitment to promoting] respect for diversity…[as fundamental to preventing the emergence and spread of violent extremism, in all its forms] (terrorism)

2017-10: [We reaffirm our commitment to promoting] respect for dignity of women and girls…[as fundamental to preventing the emergence and spread of violent extremism, in all its forms] (terrorism)

2017-11: [We reaffirm our commitment to promoting] tolerance and inclusive dialogue [as fundamental to preventing the emergence and spread of violent extremism, in all its forms] (terrorism)

2017-12: we will continue to support the full implementation of all relevant UN Security Council Resolutions and relevant international instruments, as well as the recent efforts aimed at addressing the links between terrorism and transnational organized crime that finance terrorism and undermine our security and economic growth. (terrorism)

2017-13: We will continue to support the Secretary- General's Plan of Action to Prevent Violent Extremism (PVE) to ensure countries are equipped with the strategies, expertise and tools they need to address this challenge. (terrorism)

2017-14: As founding members, we continue to support the Global Counterterrorism Forum (GCTF)… in their CT and CVE activities. (terrorism)

2017-15: [As founding members, we continue to support] the Global Community Engagement and Resilience Fund (GCERF)…[in their CT and CVE activities] (terrorism)

2017-16: [As founding members, we continue to support] the Hedayah Centre …[in their CT and CVE activities] (terrorism)

2017-17: [As founding members, we continue to support] the International Institute for Justice and the Rule of Law (IIJ) in their CT and CVE activities. (terrorism)

2017-18: We will enhance cooperation in monitoring cross-border movements of returning foreign terrorist fighters… also with a view to preventing the planning of terrorist attacks, and countering the violent messages terrorists spread in their propaganda. (terrorism)

2017-19: [We will enhance cooperation]…in exchanging information and evidence…[also with a view to preventing the planning of terrorist attacks, and countering the violent messages terrorists spread in their propaganda] (terrorism)

2017-20: [We will enhance cooperation]…in partnering with countries in the Middle East, Central Asia, North Africa, the Sahel, the Horn of Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, South Eastern Europe, East, South east and South Asia, [also with a view to preventing the planning of terrorist attacks, and countering the violent messages terrorists spread in their propaganda] (terrorism)

2017-21: We will seek wherever possible to prosecute individuals for offences committed (terrorism)

2017-22: we are also committed to supporting activities aimed at reducing the risks posed by foreign terrorist fighters and family members returning from conflict zones, including, when appropriate, rehabilitation and reintegration efforts, as well as activities that strengthen community resilience to violent extremism. (terrorism)

2017-23: We will therefore continue to seek the widest degree of engagement with civil society representatives…to build effective community-level responses to counter violent extremism. (terrorism)

2017-24: [We will therefore continue to seek the widest degree of engagement with] local communities [to build effective community-level responses to counter violent extremism] (terrorism)

2017-25: [We will therefore continue to seek the widest degree of engagement with] youth [to build effective community-level responses to counter violent extremism] (terrorism)

2017-26: [We will therefore continue to seek the widest degree of engagement with] religious leaders [to build effective community-level responses to counter violent extremism] (terrorism)

2017-26: [We will therefore continue to seek the widest degree of engagement with] women [to build effective community-level responses to counter violent extremism] (terrorism)

2017-27: [We will therefore continue to seek the widest degree of engagement with] detention facilities [to build effective community-level responses to counter violent extremism] (terrorism)

2017-30: [We will therefore continue to seek the widest degree of engagement with] educational institutions [to build effective community-level responses to counter violent extremism] (terrorism)

2017-31: [We will therefore continue to seek the widest degree of engagement with] private sector [to build effective community-level responses to counter violent extremism] (terrorism)

2017-32: We aim not only to counter the narratives supporting terrorism and violent extremism and to expose the fallacy of ISIL/Da'esh's and other groups' propaganda, but also to build an alternative and positive narrative, promoting a world-view based on our common values and on the active, constructive and integrated participation in open and inclusive societies that respect diversity and equal citizenship. (terrorism)

2017-33: We remain committed to playing a key role in countering terrorist financing, including funds stemming from kidnap for ransom and organised crime, supporting full implementation of the relevant UN Security Council Resolutions and relevant international instruments, including the UN Convention against Transnational Organized Crime (UNTOC), and actively participating in the main fora and international initiatives on these issues. (terrorism)

2017-34: We will continue to integrate international multilateral efforts into national actions in order to foster coordination and effectiveness in disrupting the sources of financial flows generated by individuals, groups, undertakings and entities associated with terrorism or providing terrorism with any form of support. (terrorism)

2017-35: We will engage industry and wider partners to find a solution that permits governments to obtain lawfully and on a systematic basis, at the request of competent authorities, critical data and contents. This will be done in a way that protects the right to privacy and the human rights of vulnerable users while also facilitating criminal investigations and ensuring that there are no safe spaces where terrorists can communicate online. (terrorism)

2017-36: As we commit to fighting the use of the Internet for terrorist purposes, we will spare no efforts in defending freedom of speech and the free and equitable access to the Internet. (terrorism)

2017-37: We will also continue to seek to enhance cooperation between law enforcement and criminal justice authorities… in fighting transnational organized crime, particularly that which directly or indirectly supports or facilitates terrorism, including illicit smuggling of migrants and trafficking in persons, drugs, wildlife, firearms, and other weapons. (terrorism)

2017-38: [We will also continue to seek to enhance] partnership with the private sector and civil society [in fighting transnational organized crime, particularly that which directly or indirectly supports or facilitates terrorism, including illicit smuggling of migrants and trafficking in persons, drugs, wildlife, firearms, and other weapons] (terrorism)

2017-39: we reiterate our determination to implement fully the G7 Action Plan on Countering Terrorism and Violent Extremism adopted at the G7 Ise-Shima Summit. (terrorism)

2017-40: We will enhance our efforts, individually and collectively, to promote better implementation of effective aviation security measures, both through ICAO and through direct action with other states where necessary in order to protect the safety of our citizens. (terrorism)

2017-41: we encourage the G7 Roma–Lyon Group to continue work on issues related to border and aviation security, enhancing priority countries' connectivity to INTERPOL Databases and all other areas of cooperation relevant to countering terrorism. (terrorism)

ISIL – DA'ESH / Syria / Iraq

2017-42: We commit to continuing these efforts in order to complete the liberation of ISIL/Da'esh-held territories, in particular Raqqa and Mosul, and put an end to violence, widespread and gross violations and abuses of human rights and violations of humanitarian law, perpetrated by ISIL/Da'esh, all in the pursuit of finally destroying it. (terrorism)

2017-43: There must be accountability for all crimes committed by ISIL/Da'esh in Iraq, Syria and beyond, including the most serious crimes of international concern, and as such, we stand ready to support efforts to hold perpetrators to account. (terrorism)

2017-44: We are determined to defeat ISIL/Da'esh in Iraq and Syria. (terrorism)

2017-45: We will work with local partners to ensure ISIL/Da'esh and other terrorist entities do not re- emerge in the area. (terrorism)

Syria

2017-45: We reiterate our commitment to the unity, sovereignty, territorial integrity and independence of the Syrian State. (regional security)

2017-46: We express grave concern at the continuing and alarming reports of the intense use of chemical weapons, including toxic chemicals as weapons, in Syria, and reiterate our strong support for the absolutely necessary work of the OPCWUN mandated Joint Investigative Mechanism, which concluded that the Syrian Arab Armed Forces were responsible for the use of toxic chemicals as weapons in three instances and ISIL/Da'esh in the use of chemical weapons in one. (nonproliferation)

2017-47: We express our resolve to ensure that the use of chemical weapons remains a taboo. (nonproliferation)

2017-48: We express full support to the OPCW Fact Finding Mission investigation (nonproliferation)

Iraq

2017-49: We reassert our continued support for the independence, sovereignty, unity and territorial integrity of Iraq, whose stabilization and good governance remain central for the overall future of the region. (regional security)

2017-50: We continue to support strongly the efforts of the Iraqi authorities, the UN and the Global Coalition to address the immediate needs arising from the Mosul campaign and throughout Iraq. (terrorism)

2017-51: We reiterate our full support to Prime Minister al-Abadi and strongly encourage the Government of Iraq to continue in its efforts to advance reconciliation at national and local level and the implementation of political and economic reforms. (regional security)

2017-52: we reaffirm our commitment to working with and through the OPCW and other relevant organizations to mitigate the serious threat to international security posed by the use of chemical weapons by terrorist organizations. (nonproliferation)

2017-53: We support the development of a Plan of Action for Iraq to be drafted by UNESCO as agreed at the Paris Conference. (regional security)

Libya

2017-54: We reaffirm our commitment to preserving the sovereignty, integrity and unity of Libya and to support the Libyan Political Agreement (LPA) as the sole framework within which political solutions can be found. (regional security)

2017-55: We reiterate our strong support to the Presidency Council (PC) and the Government of National Accord (GNA), headed by Prime Minister Fayez Al Sarraj, as the legitimate executive authorities under the LPA, in line with UN Security Council Resolution 2259, and we underline our firm opposition to any attempt to disrupt the stabilization process. (regional security)

2017-56: We reaffirm our full support to the United Nations Support Mission in Libya (UNSMIL) and its mediation effort. (regional security)

2017-57: We reaffirm our commitment to supporting the PC/GNA and the people of Libya in order to broaden support for the LPA and reconciliation, consolidate effective state institutions, including security forces, restore public services, alleviate human suffering, protect and expand infrastructure, diversify the economy, manage migration flows, and eradicate the terrorist threat, while continuing to fight all forms of criminal activity. (regional security)

The Sahel and Lake Chad Region

2017-58: We applaud and will continue to support the efforts of the Sahel and Lake Chad Basin countries to fight terrorism and organized crime via more regional cooperation, such as the Sahel G 5 process and the Multinational Joint Task Force against Boko Haram. (terrorism)

Africa

2017-59: We support joint efforts and partnership with African nations to advance democratic governance…on the continent (good governance)

2017-60: [We support joint efforts and partnership with African nations to advance] security [on the continent] (regional security)

2017-61: [We support joint efforts and partnership with African nations to advance] stability [on the continent] (regional security)

2017-62: [We support joint efforts and partnership with African nations to advance] trade [on the continent] (trade)

2017-63: [We support joint efforts and partnership with African nations to advance] development [on the continent] (development)

2017-64: We support Africa's stability and development, we recognize its ownership and, consequently, we support its empowerment based on equal partnership. (regional security)

2017-65: In this regard, we welcome and support the WHO new Health Emergencies Programme and the implementation of the new WHO IHR Monitoring and Evaluation Framework, (health)

2017-66: we remain committed to supporting global efforts to prepare for… health emergencies and biological threats, whether naturally occurring, deliberate or accidental. (health)

2017-67: [we remain committed to supporting global efforts to] prevent…[health emergencies and biological threats, whether naturally occurring, deliberate or accidental] (health)

2017-68: [we remain committed to supporting global efforts to] detect…[health emergencies and biological threats, whether naturally occurring, deliberate or accidental] (health)

2017-69: [we remain committed to supporting global efforts to] notify…[health emergencies and biological threats, whether naturally occurring, deliberate or accidental] (health)

2017-70: [we remain committed to supporting global efforts to] respond to [health emergencies and biological threats, whether naturally occurring, deliberate or accidental] (health)

Yemen

2017-71: we fully support the mediation efforts of the UN Special Envoy for Yemen (regional security)

2017-72: We reiterate our commitment to counter all forms of terrorism in Yemen. (terrorism)

Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

2017-73: We support the resumption without delay of substantive peace talks between the Israelis and the Palestinians aimed at achieving a negotiated solution that ensures the peace and security of both and takes into account UN Security Council Resolutions 242, 338 and 1515. (peace and security)

2017-74: we strongly support dialogue and practical collaboration particularly in the field of security (international cooperation)

2017-75: [we strongly support dialogue and practical collaboration particularly in the field of] access to water (international cooperation)

2017-76: [we strongly support dialogue and practical collaboration particularly in the field of] sanitation (international cooperation)

2017-77: [we strongly support dialogue and practical collaboration particularly in the field of] energy resources (international cooperation)

2017-78: [we strongly support dialogue and practical collaboration particularly in] growing the Palestinian economy. (international cooperation)

Ukraine

2017-79: We reaffirm our strongest support to the negotiating efforts of the Normandy Group and to the multifaceted commitment of the OSCE for a solution to the crisis in Ukraine. (regional security)

2017-80: We maintain our commitment to assisting Ukraine in implementing its ambitious and yet necessary reform agenda. (regional security)

2017-81: We remain committed to providing support and assistance to accomplish the required reforms in the fiscal sector (financial regulation)

2017-82: [We remain committed to providing support and assistance to accomplish the required reforms in the] judicial financial [sector] (financial regulation)

2017-83: [We remain committed to providing support and assistance to accomplish the required reforms in the] energy [sector] (energy)

2017-84: [We remain committed to providing support and assistance to accomplish the required reforms in the] health [sector] (health)

2017-85: [We remain committed to providing support and assistance to accomplish the required reforms in the] welfare [sector] (social protection)

2017-86: [We remain committed to providing support and assistance to accomplish the required reforms in the] custom [sector] (trade)

2017-87: [We remain committed to providing support and assistance to accomplish the required reforms in the] corporate governance of State-owned enterprises. (accountability)

2017-88: We remain committed to the Rome G7 Initiative for Energy Security to build a more diversified and resilient international energy system. (energy)

Russia

2017-89: In addition, enhanced people-to-people contacts can form the basis for growing confidence in our bilateral and multilateral relations. We stand ready to intensify these contacts (international cooperation)

Iran

2017-90: We support the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPoA) as an important contribution to the non-proliferation regime. (nonproliferation)

2017-91: We commend and continue supporting the IAEA in its crucial work in Iran, including monitoring and verification to help ensure compliance with Iran's JCPoA commitments and safeguard obligations, thus playing a key role in fostering mutual trust. (nonproliferation)

Afghanistan

2017-92: We reaffirm our long term commitment to a peaceful, stable and prosperous Afghanistan. (regional security)

2017-93: We strongly support the efforts of the Government of Afghanistan and the international community to facilitate an Afghan-led and Afghan-owned peace process. (regional security)

North Korea

2017-93: We are determined to strengthen measures aimed at achieving these objectives. (regional security)

Non-Proliferation and Disarmament

2017-94: We remain committed to the universalization and implementation of the in force Treaties and Conventions relevant to preventing and combating the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, namely the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) and the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BWC). (nonproliferation)

2017-95: And to this end, we continue to lend our full support to the efforts of the G7-led Global Partnership Against the Spread of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction to reduce the threat of terrorist acquisition of such weapons and materials worldwide. (nonproliferation)

2017-96: In this respect, we reiterate our support for a halt to the production of fissile material for nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices, which is the objective of a fissile material cut-off treaty (nonproliferation)

2017-97: We also stress our commitment to take advantage of the upcoming NPT review cycle and, by focusing on fundamental common interests, to achieve progress, in strengthening the NPT as the cornerstone of the nuclear non-proliferation regime, and a foundation for nuclear disarmament and peaceful uses of nuclear energy in conformity with non-proliferation obligations. (nonproliferation)

2017-98: In this regard, we fully support the UN Program of Action to Prevent, Combat and Eradicate the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons in all its Aspects and we endorse Target 16.4 of the Sustainable Development Goals to significantly reduce illicit arms flows by 2030. (nonproliferation)

2017-99: We stand ready to keep supporting efforts deployed by affected states, in particular on the African continent, to this aim. (nonproliferation)

2017-100: We continue to promote effective systems of national controls for exports and imports of conventional arms, such as those called for in the Arms Trade Treaty, to contribute to international and regional peace, security, and stability. (nonproliferation)

Outer Space

2017-101: We are committed to enhancing the long-term safety, security, sustainability, and stability of the space environment, (peace and security)

2017-102: [We are committed to] increasing transparency in space activities (transparency)

2017-103: [We are committed to] strengthening norms of responsible behaviour for all outer space activities (peace and security)

Maritime Security

2017-104: We reaffirm our commitment to further international cooperation on maritime security and safety (international cooperation)

2017-105: [We reaffirm our commitment to further international cooperation on] the protection of the marine environment. (international cooperation)

2017-106: We are committed to coordinating our actions internationally, regionally and nationally in order to achieve global benefits. (international cooperation)

2017-107: We reiterate our commitment to maintaining a rules-based maritime order based firmly on international law, including as reflected in the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) (peace and security)

2017-108: [We reiterate our commitment to] peaceful dispute settlement, including through legal means and supported by confidence building measures. (peace and security)

2017-109: We reiterate our commitment to the freedoms of navigation and over-flight and other rights, freedoms, and internationally lawful uses of the seas. (peace and security)

2017-110: We commit to pursuing a more holistic approach to support national and regional efforts and their ownership, which remain key in improving maritime security in the existing critical areas. (peace and security)

2017-111: We will continue our cooperation at national and international level ashore and at sea in order to fight human trafficking and the smuggling of migrants in the maritime domain – and in particular in those areas requiring the highest degree of attention – also safeguarding against any further loss of life at sea. (human rights)

2017-112: We are committed to supporting regional maritime security in regions affected by maritime crimes through comprehensive capacity building assistance under existing instruments in areas such as maritime governance, coast guard authorities and functions, disaster relief, maritime search and rescue, and maritime information sharing and integration including Maritime Domain Awareness (MDA), as well as efforts to improve legislative, judicial, and prosecutorial capacities. (regional security)

2017-113: We support the work of the Preparatory Committee on the development of a future internationally legally binding instrument under UNCLOS on the conservation and sustainable use of marine biological diversity in areas beyond national jurisdiction. (environment)

2017-114: We are committed to supporting cooperation, capacity-building and appropriate access to financial and technical support to help countries realize their priorities while safeguarding the ocean's health and improving climate resilience in order to ensure conservation and sustainable use of living marine resources including marine biodiversity. (climate change)

Cyber

2017-115: We reaffirm our support for an accessible, open, interoperable, reliable and secure cyberspace. (ICT)

2017-116: Recognizing the threat of the use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) against critical infrastructure, noting increased concern over cyber-enabled interference in democratic processes, and bearing in mind the risk of misperceptions and uncontrolled escalation, we reaffirm our commitment to work within the G7 and other relevant international and multi-stakeholder fora to promote strategic frameworks for conflict prevention, cooperation and stability in cyberspace. (ICT)

2017-117: We reiterate our support for the United Nations Group of Governmental Experts on Developments in the Field of Information and Telecommunications in the Context of International Security (UN-GGE) process (ICT)

2017-118: Against this background, we have adopted the G7 Declaration on Responsible States Behaviour in Cyberspace and reinforce our commitment to its strategic framework for conflict prevention, cooperation and stability in cyberspace, as a concrete contribution to peace and security, and we encourage similar commitments from other States. (ICT)

Deauville Partnership

2017-119: We reaffirm our support to the efforts of the Middle East and North Africa countries (MENA) to cope with the severe challenges that the region has been facing, including the presence of open conflicts as well as the rise and spread of violent extremism, which are contributing to complex humanitarian crises and unprecedented displacement and cross-border movements of people. (regional security)

2017-120: We remain committed to supporting these countries through the Deauville Partnership, an important platform for policy dialogue and cooperation between the G7, ACTs, regional partners and relevant international institutions. (development)

2017-21: We stand ready to consider a further evolution of the Partnership and the G7's relationship with the ACTs, in light of the developments in the MENA Region. (development)

2017-22: We commit to exploring with the ACT countries the best means for supporting them and we remain open to possible cooperation with other initiatives focusing on the Mediterranean. (development)

UN, Peace and Security

2017-123: We are committed to strengthening the impact and effectiveness of UN peacekeeping operations and peace-building activities by improving leadership, increasing accountability, expanding the pool of capable forces through appropriate training of personnel, and enhancing integrated planning, with a focus on ensuring that UN peacekeeping missions are better able to provide the appropriate international response for the circumstances, and that they are properly designed for the tasks they are mandated to perform. (peace and security)

2017-124: We also reaffirm our commitment to address the gaps in peacekeepers' equipment. (peace and security)

2017-125: We will also work to enhance and diversify the UN's conflict prevention and mediation capabilities. (peace and security)

2017-126: We therefore support the ongoing reforms of the UN's peace and security architecture. (peace and security)

2017-127: We reaffirm our commitment to achieving the highest standards of conduct and discipline of UN peacekeepers, including through training (peace and security)

2017-128: As governments and donors, we will continue to promote the equal and full involvement of women as actors of peace, recognizing their key role in conflict prevention, mediation peacebuilding and stabilization. (gender)

2017-129: We will continue to promote a security response to prevent and protect women, children and youth from sexual and gender-based violence during armed conflict. (gender)

2017-130: We reaffirm our commitment to develop and to encourage the adoption of National Action Plans to implement the Women, Peace and Security agenda. (gender)

Human Rights

2017-131: We reaffirm our commitment to the protection and promotion of all human rights and fundamental freedoms. (human rights)

2017-132: We will continue to oppose and work to eliminate all forms of discrimination across the world. (human rights)

2017-133: We will continue to promote actively gender equality and women's rights. (gender)

2017-134: We are fully committed to an effective implementation of the Beijing Platform for Action, the outcomes of their review conferences, (gender)

2017-135: [We are fully committed to an effective implementation of] the Cairo Program of Action…[the outcomes of their review conferences] (development)

2017-136: [We are fully committed to] the fulfilment of States' obligations under the Convention on Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women to empower women and girls and to advance their human rights as a matter of priority, also in line with the 2030 Agenda. (gender)

2017-137: We remain committed to combat all forms of violence against women and girls, men and boys, including gender-based violence and sexual violence in conflict (gender)

2017-138: [We remain committed] to end harmful practices such as child early and forced marriages and female genital mutilations. (gender)

2017-39: we commit to enhance efforts to reach those most vulnerable. (human rights)

2017-140: We commit to redoubling our efforts to achieving the eradication of forced and child labour, modern slavery and human trafficking. (human rights)

2017-141: We will continue working to shape conditions conducive for civil society activities and to safeguard the safety and rights of human rights defenders and journalists. (human rights)

G7 Foreign Ministers Meeting: Declaration on Responsible States Behaviour in Cyberspace

Introduction

2017-142: We remain committed to an accessible, open, interoperable, reliable and secure cyberspace.

2017-143: Reaffirming our commitment to contribute to international cooperative action and the protection against dangers resulting from the malicious use of ICTs, we support the following Declaration, and encourage similar commitments from other States:

Declaration

2017-144: We are committed to promoting a strategic framework for conflict prevention, cooperation and stability in cyberspace, consisting of the recognition of the applicability of existing international law to State behavior in cyberspace, the promotion of voluntary, non-binding norms of responsible State behavior during peacetime, and the development and the implementation of practical cyber confidence building measures (CBMs) between States;

Statement on Non-proliferation and Disarmament

2017-145: We reiterate our commitment to safeguarding international peace and security and to creating conditions that would lead to a more secure, stable and safer world.

2017-146: We support further practical and concrete steps in the fields of nuclear arms control, disarmament and non-proliferation, aimed at achieving this goal in a way that promotes international stability and in accordance with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT).

2017-147: We the G7 Members remain committed to the full implementation of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) endorsed by UNSCR 2231(2015)

2017-148: [We the G7 Members remain committed to] contribute positively to the 2017-2020 review cycle of the NPT, which remains the cornerstone of the nuclear non-proliferation regime, and a foundation for disarmament and peaceful uses.

Regional Proliferation Challenges

2017-149: [We recall the international community's firm opposition to North Korea's development of nuclear weapons and delivery systems] and reiterate our support to the goal of the complete, verifiable and irreversible denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula.

2017-150: We are determined to urgently strengthen measures aimed at stopping North Korea from advancing military nuclear capability and related means of delivery.

2017-151: We express full support to the OPCW Fact Finding Mission investigation

2017-152: For this reason, we reaffirm our strong support for the work of the JIM

2017-153: We reiterate our commitment to working with partners around the world to address the serious threat posed by the terrorist use of chemical weapons, including toxic chemicals as weapons, in light of continuing reports of such use in both Syria and Iraq.

NPT Review Cycle

2017-154: We reaffirm our full commitment to the objectives and obligations of the NPT and pledge ourselves to redouble our efforts to uphold and strengthen the Treaty in all its aspects (non-proliferation, disarmament and peaceful uses of nuclear energy).

2017-156: We remain committed to the universalization of the NPT

2017-157: We will work collectively to achieve a successful outcome of the First Preparatory Committee for the 2020 NPT Review Conference, to be held in Vienna on 2-12 May 2017

2017-158: We reiterate our commitment to work with the IAEA, which plays a key coordinating role in strengthening capacities worldwide for the safe, secure and peaceful use of nuclear technology, in accordance with the NPT.

2017-159: We are committed to the IAEA's Technical Cooperation Program as an effective mean to promote the benefits of nuclear technology in areas such as human health, agriculture, water management and industrial applications, as well as energy to meet development needs.

Nuclear Disarmament and Arms Control

2017-160: We reaffirm our strong support for concrete measures to reduce the risk of conflict, manage escalation risks, forestall destructive arms races and otherwise promote international peace and security.

2017-161: In this respect, we reiterate our support for a halt to the production of fissile material for nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices, which is the objective of a fissile material cut-off treaty

Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) Non-Proliferation

2017-162: We strongly support existing Nuclear Weapons Free Zones on the basis of treaties freely arrived at among States of the regions concerned as a tool which can help promote nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation, as well as regional security.

2017-163: We remain committed to the establishment of a zone free of nuclear weapons as well as other WMD and their means of delivery in the Middle East, alongside efforts for a comprehensive and durable peace in that region, and call for renewed inclusive regional dialogue to achieve such a goal.

2017-164: We support the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPoA) as an important contribution to the non-proliferation regime.

2017-166: In the year of the twentieth anniversary of its entry into force, we renew our strong support to the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC)

2017-166: We are fully committed to countering the evolving threat of chemical weapons falling into the hands of terrorist groups or other non-state actors, to eradicating non-state actors possession of such weapons, and to ensuring full accountability for any State or non-state actor which uses them.

2017-167: We strongly support the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BTWC) as the cornerstone of the international ban on biological weapons.

2017-168: We reiterate our commitment to reduce global proliferation threats through sound and effective implementation of WMD-related guidelines of international export control regimes (Nuclear Suppliers Group, Missile Technology Control Regime, Australia Group) and the Zangger Committee.

2017-169: In the year of its thirtieth anniversary and while missile technology proliferation remains a matter of serious concern, we reiterate our firm support for the Missile Technology Control Regime.

2017-170: We further support outreach activities for enhanced participation to meet the emerging WMD proliferation challenges, including through expanding global support for the 2003 Statement of Interdiction Principles.

2017-171: We confirm our unwavering commitment to the Global Partnership Against the Spread of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction (GP) and its coordination of funding programs and activities to combat chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) terrorism.

Nuclear Security and Safety

2017-172: We strongly support international non-proliferation efforts, including measures aimed at preventing the spread of such material.

2017-173: Accordingly, we are strongly committed to the work of the Nuclear Security Contact Group, including the coordination of actions by States to further support and strengthen international organizations and institutions actively engaged in efforts to counter nuclear terrorism.

2017-174: We fully support continued efforts toward full implementation and universalization of these instruments

2017-175: We remain committed to facilitate the development of the infrastructure necessary for States embarking on a nuclear power program according to the highest standards of safety, security and non-proliferation.

Conventional Weapons, Including Small Arms and Light Weapons

2017-176: We will also increase our efforts to counter the diversion of weapons that may boost the capacity of criminal organizations and terrorist groups.

2017-177: We will continue to strength en cooperation in the Wassenaar Arrangement to prevent the illicit transfer of conventional arms

Outer Space

2017-178: [Outer space activities play a significant and increasing role in the social, economic, scientific and technological development of States, as well as in maintaining international peace and security.] In this context, we reiterate our commitment to preserve a safe, secure, and sustainable outer space environment and the need to evolve and implement principles of responsible behavior for all outer space activities in a prompt and pragmatic manner, ensuring the peaceful exploration and use of outer space on the basis of equality and in accordance with international law.

2017-179: We reaffirm our commitment, and call on all States, to review and implement, to the extent practicable, the proposed transparency and confidence-building measures contained in the recommendations of the UN Group of Governmental Experts Report (A/68/189, 29 July 2013) such as information exchange on space policies and strategies, information exchange and notifications related to outer space activities in a timely manner and an effective consultation mechanism.

2017-180: We strongly support efforts to rapidly complete clear, practicable and proven Guidelines for Long-Term Sustainability of Outer Space Activities by the UN Committee on the Peaceful Use of Outer Space (UN-COPUOS) by 2018.

Foreign Ministers' Joint Communiqué

N=102

2018-1: [We recognized that to be effective and durable, initiatives addressing peace and security challenges need to support women's equal and meaningful participation at all levels of decision-making processes, address women's and girls' needs and respect their rights, including their security and safety, and facilitate their access to and control of resources and the benefits of peace in line with UN Security Council Resolution (UNSCR) 1325 and other relevant resolutions.] The G7 members are committed to implementing those resolutions

2018-2: [The G7 members are committed to implementing] their respective National Action Plans on women, peace and security.

2018-3: [We underscored the strategic importance of enhancing the integration of a gender perspective into policies and initiatives, and we look forward to the contributions of the Gender Equality Advisory Council to this endeavour.] We expressed our will to support a concrete and transformative approach and identify policy options accounting for gender mainstreaming and inclusion.

The rules-based international order

2018-4: [We are concerned about resurgent forms of racism, xenophobia and discrimination worldwide, including anti-Semitism and anti-Muslim sentiment.] We will work individually and collectively to combat such discrimination and ensure that diversity is recognized and leveraged as a strength for humanity.

2018-5: We are determined to work collaboratively to reinforce our democracies against interference by hostile state and non-state actors.

2018-6: We underline the need to further protect those in situations of vulnerability, especially women, children and persons with disabilities and other persons belonging to minorities who are often marginalized or excluded in society.

2018-7: As outlined in the Toronto Commitments, we intend to redouble efforts to achieve greater awareness of and respect for international humanitarian law among national and international partners.

2018-8: We reiterate our commitment to promoting cooperative, international maritime governance

2018-9: [We reiterate our commitment to] maintaining a rules-based maritime order based on international law, including as reflected in the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS)

2018-10: [We reiterate our commitment to] building trust and ensuring security

2018-11: [We reiterate our commitment to] the peaceful management and settlement of disputes without using the threat of force or coercion and in accordance with international law, including through internationally recognized legal dispute settlement mechanisms, including arbitration.

2018-12: We reiterate our commitment to the freedom of the high seas, including the freedom of navigation and overflight

2018-13: [We reiterate our commitment] to other rights, including the rights and jurisdiction of coastal states and internationally lawful uses of the seas.

2018-14: [We reiterate our concern regarding the destruction of marine ecosystems in the South China Sea, which threatens their sustainability and regional fish stocks,] and reaffirm our commitment to increasing international cooperation to enhance protection of the marine environment.

2018-15: We reaffirm our commitment to further international cooperation on maritime security

2018-16: [We reaffirm our commitment to further international cooperation on] maritime safety

2018-17: [We reaffirm our commitment to further international cooperation on] the protection and sustainable management of the marine environment.

2018-18: We reiterate our commitment to combatting illegal activities at sea, including acts of piracy and armed robbery at sea, transnational organized crime and terrorism in the maritime domain, trafficking in persons, smuggling of migrants, trafficking of weapons and illicit drugs, and illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing.

2018-19: We are committed to supporting regional maritime security in regions affected by illegal maritime activities through comprehensive capacity building assistance under existing instruments in areas such as maritime governance, coast guard authorities and functions, disaster relief, maritime search and rescue, and maritime information sharing and integration, including maritime domain awareness.

2018-20: We stress the need to protect the human rights of refugees, asylum seekers and migrants, particularly those in the most vulnerable situations, in accordance with international law.

2018-21: We pledge to continue working in partnership, as appropriate, with countries of origin, transit and destination to address the factors that lead to irregular migration and forced displacement.

2018-22: We underscore the need for a gender-responsive approach to migration policy, noting that women and children have specific needs that should be taken into consideration, and that their inclusion and active engagement can strengthen the effectiveness of our responses.

2018-23: We pledge to coordinate efforts to support building lasting peace and democratic transition in Myanmar

2018-24: [We pledge to coordinate efforts to] promote accountability for the human rights violations and abuses committed in Myanmar, particularly in northern Rakhine

2018-25: [We pledge to coordinate efforts to] provide life-saving gender-responsive humanitarian assistance, especially for survivors of sexual violence.

2018-26: We reaffirm our shared commitment to the security, stability, prosperity, full sovereignty and European Union aspirations of the Western Balkans.

2018-27: [To this end, we emphasize the importance of advancing the rule of law and respect for human rights,] and confirm our shared commitment to tackling the full range of challenges and opportunities through a comprehensive approach.

2018-28: We reiterate our enduring support for Ukrainian sovereignty, independence and territorial integrity within its internationally recognized borders.

2018-29: We fully support the efforts within the Normandy format and of the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe for a solution to the conflict in eastern Ukraine.

2018-30: [We recall that the duration of Donbas-related economic sanctions is clearly linked to Russia's complete and irreversible implementation of the Minsk Agreements. These sanctions can be rolled back only if Russia truly fulfills its commitments,] but we also stand ready to take further restrictive measures should Russia's actions so require.

2018-31: We reconfirm our support for Ukraine's reform

2018-32: We are committed to protecting and promoting the rules-based international system.

2018-33: Notwithstanding, we will continue to engage with Russia on addressing regional crises and global challenges.

2018-34: We will continue to bolster our capabilities to address hybrid threats, including in the areas of cybersecurity, strategic communications and counter-intelligence.

2018-35: We wish to cooperate with China to resolve the challenges to regional and global peace and prosperity, notably on the Korean Peninsula.

2018-36: We underscore the need to take into consideration the detrimental humanitarian situation in the DPRK when dealing with asylum seekers, including abstaining from forcibly repatriating asylum seekers to the DPRK and allowing safe passage for DPRK asylum seekers transiting through China.

2018-37: We stand ready to assist these countries, as appropriate, to fulfill their positive ambitions.

Non-proliferation and disarmament

2018-38: We are committed to working together and with our partners to promote international peace and security, and to create the conditions for a more secure, stable and safer world.

2018-39: We reaffirm that we will never accept a nuclear-armed DPRK and remain committed to the goal of achieving complete, verifiable and irreversible dismantlement of the DPRK's WMDs, including biological and chemical weapons, missiles and related facilities, for the peace and stability of the Korean Peninsula and beyond.

2018-40: Noting that meaningful negotiations must imply concrete actions by the DPRK toward denuclearization, we are committed to maintaining maximum pressure, including by cutting down or reducing DPRK diplomatic representation abroad and downgrading economic relationships.

2018-41: Until the DPRK denuclearizes, we further commit to countering the DPRK's sanctions-evasion tactics, particularly through its illicit maritime activities, including prohibited ship-to-ship transfers of petroleum and sales of coal and other UN-banned commodities, as well as its malicious cyber activities.

2018-42: We further resolve to make clear to the DPRK that a diplomatic solution leading to complete, verifiable and irreversible dismantlement of WMDs and missiles, as well as related facilities, is the DPRK's only viable option and would lead to a brighter future within the international community.

2018-43: We intend to continue our coordination on capacity building, counter-proliferation and proliferation financing.

2018-44: We are committed to permanently ensuring that Iran's nuclear program remains exclusively peaceful, in line with its NPT obligations and its commitments under the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) never to seek, develop or acquire a nuclear weapon.

2018-45: We strongly support the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in its crucial monitoring and verification work to help ensure Iran's compliance with its JCPOA and other commitments, including safeguard obligations.

2018-46: We intend to continue to our work to counter Iran's regional proliferation of ballistic missiles and its unlawful arms transfers.

2018-47: We reaffirm our commitments to joint efforts to reinforce the goals of the NPT as the essential cornerstone of the nuclear non-proliferation regime and as a foundation for the pursuit of nuclear disarmament and peaceful uses of nuclear energy.

2018-48: [We also welcome the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty's potential contribution to nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament,] and reaffirm our commitments to promote the International Monitoring System.

2018-49: While recognizing the constraints of the current international security environment, we remain strongly committed to the goal of ultimately achieving a world without nuclear weapons, to be pursued using practical and concrete steps in accordance with the NPT's emphasis on easing tension and strengthening trust among states.

2018-50: [Outer space plays a vital role in global prosperity and security but is increasingly congested and contested.] We commit to respond to these threats by continuing to advance and develop norms of responsible behaviour to ensure the safety, stability and sustainability of space so that all countries can benefit from its peaceful use.

2018-51: We confirm … our commitment to build collective resilience against such threats.

2018-52: We are committed to preventing conflicts from extending into outer space through voluntary, pragmatic transparency and confidence building measures and guidelines.

2018-53: In this context, we reaffirm our support to the International Partnership against Impunity for the Use of Chemical Weapons

2018-54: We underline our commitment to ensuring accountability of those who use chemical weapons through all means available, including, as appropriate through the sharing of information, sanctions measures and strengthening the capacity of participating states.

2018-55: We reaffirm our strong commitment to the Global Partnership against the Spread of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction as a proven and effective mechanism for addressing WMD proliferation threats that exist worldwide.

2018-56: In its 15th anniversary year, we also reiterate our support for the complementary efforts of the Proliferation Security Initiative

2018-57: We are committed to continuing to promote effective systems of national controls for exports and imports of conventional arms and dual-use goods, including those called for in the Arms Trade Treaty

2018-58: [We are committed to continuing] to supporting improvements in stockpile management and law enforcement cooperation.

2018-59: We support the full implementation of the UN Programme of Action to Prevent, Combat and Eradicate the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons, in All Its Aspects

2018-60: We remain committed to comprehensive mine action addressing mines, explosive remnants of war and unexploded ordnance.

Transnational security threats

2018-61: We [celebrate successes against Daesh, al Qaeda and other groups but] are resolved to continue to fight them and all their affiliates through multilateral counterterrorism efforts, including the Global Coalition to Defeat ISIS and the Global Counterterrorism Forum

2018-62: [We are resolved to] continuing to tackle the threat from al Qaeda and other terrorist groups.

2018-63: We [welcome the establishment of the UN Office of Counter-Terrorism and] will work to ensure‎ that the review of the UN Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy continues to promote balanced implementation across all four of its pillars and the recommendations of the Secretary General's Plan of Action to Prevent Violent Extremism.

2018-64: We recognize that violent extremists and terrorists manipulate and exploit gender stereotypes and dynamics to attract and maintain recruits and use sexual and gender-based violence, including trafficking in persons and rape, and we are committed to holding those responsible to account.

2018-65: We recognize that violent extremists and terrorists manipulate and exploit gender stereotypes and dynamics to attract and maintain recruits and use sexual and gender-based violence, including trafficking in persons and rape, and we are committed to holding those responsible to account.

2018-66: Recognizing that gender-responsive measures that include women's perspectives and participation to prevent and eradicate terrorism are vital to effective and sustainable results, we are committed to fully integrating the women, peace and security agenda into our counterterrorism policies and programs.

2018-67: We are committed to developing and implementing common measures to address the risks posed by the international travel of terrorists, including foreign terrorist fighters (FTFs), as outlined in the joint commitments of the G7 foreign and security ministers.

2018-68: We recognize the importance of holding returning FTFs accountable for their actions and are committed to providing appropriate disengagement, rehabilitation and reintegration programs, with special consideration afforded to children, youth and women based on their age and gender needs.

2018-69: We remain committed to enhancing our efforts, individually and collectively, to promote better implementation of effective aviation security measures.

2018-70: In this regard we welcome and offer our full support to the International Civil Aviation Organization to deliver early and substantive implementation of the new Global Aviation Security Plan.

2018-71: We strongly support the full implementation of UNSCR 2396 on measures to counter threats to international peace and security caused by terrorist acts.

2018-72: We continue to support measures to tackle terrorist financing, including via UNSCR 2368 on the Daesh and al Qaeda sanctions regime, UNSCR 1373, UNSCR 1267 and its successors

2018-73: [We continue to support] UNSCR 2347 on the protection of cultural heritage from illicit trafficking

2018-74: [We continue to support] UNSCR 2341 on the protection of critical infrastructure.

2018-75: In this context, we reiterate our resolve to prevent terrorist groups from using kidnap for ransom as a means of raising funds for their activities and harming our citizens at home and overseas, in accordance with the relevant international conventions.

2018-76: We reiterate our commitment to bringing perpetrators to justice, and to this end we intend to further enhance cooperation between law enforcement and criminal justice authorities, including in partnership with third countries with due regard for human rights.

2018-77: We are committed to working together to strengthen cross-border law enforcement and tackle associated corruption, to close markets for illegally traded wildlife and wildlife products, including elephant ivory.

2018-78: We will support the October conference in London as an important moment in strengthening the global fight against the illegal wildlife trade and threats to protected species.

2018-79: We remain committed to an accessible, open, interoperable, reliable and secure cyberspace for all.

2018-80: We pledge support for the development and implementation of practical cyber confidence-building measures between states, as well as capacity-building support for their implementation.

2018-81: We reiterate our support for the G7 Lucca Declaration on Responsible State Behavior in Cyberspace [as well as "The Principles and Actions on Cyber" endorsed in Ise-Shima.]

2018-82: We reaffirm our commitment to contribute to international cooperative action by working together to develop measures aimed at preventing, deterring, discouraging and countering malicious cyber acts and thus strengthen our collective resolve to deter malicious cyber actors by imposing costs in a timely manner.

2018-83: Further, we will continue working closely together to set out clear conditions for facilitating access to digital evidence for law enforcement and judicial authorities, including through the negotiation of an Additional Protocol to the Budapest Convention with the necessary conditions and safeguards, and in full respect of human rights.

2018-84: We also reaffirm our commitment to prevent the use of the Internet for terrorist and violent extremist purposes.

2018-85: We express our determination to continue to work in support of security ministers to encourage technology companies to implement measures necessary to prevent and counter radicalization to violence, terrorist recruitment and operational planning using the Internet to counter violent extremist and terrorist narratives while fostering positive alternative narratives. To increase their effectiveness, these efforts must be coordinated with other counterterrorism and countering-violent-extremism interventions.

Conflict prevention and support for UN efforts and reform

2018-86: We further stress the need to accelerate efforts to increase the number of women serving in a full range of peacekeeping roles, including leadership positions across the UN.

2018-87: [We also acknowledge that civil society, in particular local women's organizations and movements, plays a central role in conflict prevention and often needs support to effectively carry out its functions. In this context, we welcome initiatives such as the WPS Focal Points Network, launched on the margins of the UN General Assembly in 2016.] We are committed to demonstrating leadership in this area, notably by continuing to strengthen partnerships with international and regional organizations, as well as civil society organizations.

2018-88: As per our Toronto Commitments, we intend to build tailored partnerships based on mutual learning and approaches in order to address the challenges related to the situation and role of women in promoting peace and security.

2018-89: We confirm our intention to accelerate the global implementation of the youth, peace and security agenda, as set out in UNSCR 2250, including through investing in young people's resilience and promoting their meaningful inclusion in all efforts for maintaining and promoting peace and security.

2018-90: We reiterate our support for African-led peace and security initiatives and welcome the commitment of the AU and its member states to assume more responsibilities, including financial.

2018-91: We also support both the accelerated implementation of the AU Roadmap for Peace and Reconciliation in the Central African Republic and the Intergovernmental Authority on Development's High-Level Revitalization Forum process for South Sudan.

2018-92: We also reiterate our support for the Multinational Joint Task Force against Boko Haram and Daesh-West Africa.

2018-93: We support a phased and conditions-based transition of security responsibilities from the African Mission in Somalia (AMISOM) to Somali security forces with clear target dates, and we stress the need for to identify sustainable funding for AMISOM.

2018-94: We [welcome the operationalization of the G5 Sahel Joint Force and] continue to support the efforts of the G5 Sahel states in improving regional cooperation and the fight against terrorism, underscoring the need to respect human rights.

2018-95: We [welcome the efforts of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General (SRSG), Ghassan Salamé,] and support the UN-led Action Plan presented in September 2017 to support the stabilization of Libya through an inclusive Libyan political reconciliation process.

2018-96: We recognize and fully support the UN Support Mission in Libya's efforts, which are working to prepare the ground for successful national elections.

2018-97: We are firmly committed to promoting accountability for those responsible for chemical weapons use and other abuses of international human rights law and violations of humanitarian law, including by supporting prosecutions, where possible.

2018-98: We express our commitment to a long-term, broad partnership with Iraq, on the basis of shared economic, diplomatic, cultural and security cooperation.

2018-99: We support the efforts of the Iraqi authorities, the UN and the Global Coalition to restore security and basic services in liberated areas

2018-100: [We support the efforts of the Iraqi authorities, the UN and the Global Coalition to] provide assistance to internally displaced persons so that they can return to their homes in a safe, dignified and voluntary manner, should they choose to do so.

2018-101: We remain concerned about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

2018-102: We reiterate our commitment to a political and negotiated solution for Afghanistan, as part of an Afghan-led and Afghan-owned inclusive process supported by all key regional and international stakeholders.

Annex 1 FM: Promoting Implementation of International Humanitarian Law

N=3

The G7 will, as appropriate:

2018-103: seek commitments from partners to enhance respect for IHL;

2018-104: continue to help increase the capacity of state and, when relevant, non-state partners to implement international humanitarian law by assisting them to incorporate IHL into their doctrine, education, field training, operational decision-making processes and rules of engagement; and

2018-105: assist partners in ensuring that their disciplinary and/or judicial structures are capable of effectively addressing their own IHL violations should they occur and holding persons accountable for IHL violations in accordance with applicable requirements of international law.

Annex 2 FM: The G7 Women, Peace and Security Partnerships Initiative

N=10

2018-106: Through a Women, Peace and Security (WPS) Partnerships Initiative, the G7 members will work together to accelerate positive change on the ground.

2018-107: G7 members will coordinate efforts as appropriate and provide targeted support to conflict-affected partner countries working to build peace and security through the implementation of UN Security Council Resolution 1325 and subsequent WPS resolutions, including through national action plans to implement the women, peace and security agenda.

In pursuing the WPS Partnerships Initiative, G7 members commit to:

2018-108: establish partnerships with and provide targeted assistance to partner countries to further implementation of the women, peace and security agenda;

2018-109: enhance G7 coordination, support and engagement in partner countries on women, peace and security issues, engaging with governments;

2018-110: [enhance G7 coordination, support and engagement in partner countries on women, peace and security issues, engaging with] regional and multilateral organizations;

2018-111: [enhance G7 coordination, support and engagement in partner countries on women, peace and security issues, engaging with] parliamentarians; civil society, in particular women's organizations;

2018-112: [enhance G7 coordination, support and engagement in partner countries on women, peace and security issues, engaging with] other stakeholders;

2018-113: ensure that all efforts to support the women, peace and security agenda are based on mutual learning and approaches;

2018-114: share results and lessons learned from this G7 initiative in other multilateral contexts to encourage similar initiatives and achieve broader progress;

2018-115: report on progress on this commitment at the next G7 FMM, in 2019.

Defending Democracy — Addressing Foreign Threats (FM and SM)

N=6

2018-116: We are committed to a rules-based international order, which is central to the maintenance and development of free, open, well-governed, pluralistic, peaceful, and prosperous societies, together with cooperation and security among states.

2018-117: Foreign actors seeking to undermine democratic institutions and processes through coercive, corrupt, covert or malicious means constitute a strategic threat, which we commit to confront together, and with other countries that share democratic values.

2018-118: We commit to exchange information to reinforce our democracies and strengthen our societies' resilience. 

2018-119: [We commit to] coordinate action and develop strategies [to reinforce our democracies and strengthen our societies' resilience.]

2018-120: We will identify focal points in G7 countries to facilitate cooperation.

2018-121: We commit to providing advice to leaders in time for the Charlevoix Summit outlining our coordinated approach to reinforce our democracies and respond to interference in countries democratic systems, including, but not restricted to, the following illustrative examples: [see document for list]

Managing Foreign Terrorist Fighters and Associated Travellers (FM and SM)

N=17

We commit to working together to manage the threats posed by these individuals and their families, through a range of enforcement, disruption and prosecution measures, and in cases where applicable, disengagement, deradicalization and reintegration. Measures will respect human rights and the rule of law, and should be gender-sensitive. To this end we will:

2018-122: Address information-sharing challenges related to these threats, in accordance with domestic and international laws and regulations

2018-123: enhance cooperation among relevant border, security and judicial authorities, including cooperation with Interpol. Particular attention should be paid to ensuring that critical information is shared in a timely manner.

2018-124: Bolster global aviation security to better detect and address these threats by working together and with the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), to elevate global security standards and deliver full implementation of the new Global Aviation Security Plan.

2018-125: In line with UN Security Council Resolution (UNSCR) 2396, commit to working with ICAO to establish a standard for the collection, use, processing and protection of PNR data, with full respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms. Particular attention will be given to ensuring that screening measures are not gender biased, where appropriate.

Implement the following UNSCRs ourselves and support others to implement:

2018-126: UNSCR 2178 (2014) and 2396 (2017) on foreign terrorist fighters, with particular reference to passenger data

2018-127: [UNSCR 2178 (2014) and 2396 (2017) on foreign terrorist fighters, with particular reference to] biometric border systems implementation

2018-128: [UNSCR 2178 (2014) and 2396 (2017) on foreign terrorist fighters, with particular reference to]prevention of violent extremist and terrorist use of the Internet

2018-129: UNSCR 2242 (2015), particularly with regards to applying the women, peace and security agenda to counterterrorism efforts.

2018-130: UNSCR 2250 (2015), with regards to the role of youth in preventing and countering violent extremism.

2018-131: Support and coordinate technical assistance to third-party countries toward implementing UNSCR 2396, with regard to sharing information on returning foreign terrorist fighters within the limits of UNSCR 2396.

2018-132: Enhance information sharing among competent authorities at the national level and through international frameworks to improve the collection, sharing and admissibility of battlefield information, in accordance with domestic and international laws and regulations, for both prevention (detection, border security, risk assessment) and prosecution (criminal justice) purposes.

2018-133: Strengthen collaboration between practitioners and policy makers on challenges related to intervention strategies

2018-134: encourage the Roma-Lyon Group on Transnational Organized Crime and Terrorism to integrate approaches and practical initiatives, including disengagement, deradicalization and reintegration strategies, that respect human rights and the rule of law, and include gender-informed and age-sensitive considerations.

2018-135: Forge strong relationships between government and civil society organizations to deliver multi-agency interventions focused on disengagement and deradicalization, while looking at enhanced screening and detection of foreign terrorist fighters and associated travellers

2018-136: continue to support the UN Plan of Action to Prevent Violent Extremism.

2018-137: Expand relationships between G7-led research initiatives and networks, including by sharing best practices and expertise with other international actors—most notably the UN, the Global Counterterrorism Forum (GCTF) and the EU, and with other affected countries.

2018-138: Step up and coordinate support to partner countries in detecting and managing foreign terrorist fighters and associated travellers. Such support could cover technical and legal assistance and sharing knowledge and best practices.

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